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DICKENS, Charles) ALBION.

Published by New York: published by the Albion, (J.S. Bartlett). 1834 (1834)

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Item Description: New York: published by the Albion, (J.S. Bartlett). 1834, 1834. Disbound. The odd small tear, some light folds. Each no. 8pp. Generally very well preserved. Three separate issues of The Albion, containing the earliest examples of Dickens?s writing in America. Between March 29, 1834 and March 21, 1835, this publication, without acknowledgement, printed six of Dickens?s earliest works including ?A Dinner at Poplar Walk? (later ?Mr. Minns & his Cousin), his first appearance in print as a storyteller. The stories present here are: 1. Mrs Joseph Porter. Vol. II, no. 13, p.104. March 29th, 1834. 2. Dinner at Poplar Walk. Vol. II, no. 14, p.106. April 5th, 1834. 3. The Bloomsbury Christening. Vol. II, no. 19, p.147. May 10th, 1834. Bookseller Inventory # 69554

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Item Description: New York: published by the Albion, (J.S. Bartlett). 1834-35, 1834. Illus., indexes; the Dickens items are all v.g; issues mostly v.g. & clean with some occasional spotting & peripheral tears; clean tear across first leaf of vol. II, no. 6. Contemp. half calf, spines numbered ?2? and ?3?; a little rubbed & worn. Bookplates of Lt. Colonel Baird. The Albion, largely without acknowledgement, printed six of Dickens?s earliest sketches including ?A Dinner at Poplar Walk? (later ?Mr. Minns & his Cousin'), his first fiction published in England. The Albion, therefore (followed by The New Yorker) became the first publication to pirate Dickens?s work, and in doing so prompted the author?s life-long campaign to secure international copyright for his works. ?The Editor of the Albion?, Dickens wrote in a letter to Joseph Lunn, Nov. 15, 1841, ?is as cool a gentleman as I ever encountered. I owe to him and such as him the having used my best endeavours to advance the passing of an International Copyright Bill on this side of the water . and the exquisite justice of never deriving sixpence from an enormous American sale of all of my books? (Pilgrim edn, Vol. 2, p.421.) The Copyright Bill was passed in 1841, but an English-American copyright law was not enacted until 1891. Dickens?s contributions appear as follows: 1. Mrs Joseph Porter. Vol. II, no. 13, p.104. March 29th, 1834. 2. Dinner at Poplar Walk. Vol. II, no. 14, p.106. April 5th, 1834. 3. The Bloomsbury Christening. Vol. II, no. 19, p.147. May 10th, 1834. 4. The Boarding House. Vol. II, no. 26, p.201 & no. 41, p.323 (second part signed ?Boz?). June 28th & October 11th, 1834. 5. The Steam Excursion. Vol. II, no. 46, p.361 (signed ?Boz?). November 15th, 1834. 6. Passage in the Life of Mr. Watkins Tottle. Vol. III, nos 6, p.43 & 12, p.92 (both parts are signed ?Boz?). February 7th & March 21st, 1835. Dickens began to write his scenes and sketches in 1833 and they started to appear in print in The Monthly Magazine in December of that year. Poplar Walk was followed by Mrs Joseph Porter in January 1834, The Bloomsbury Christening (April), The Boarding House (May and August), The Steam Excursion (October) and Passage in the Life of Mr Watkins Tottle (January and February 1835). In most cases the American publication was only a month after the first English appearance. Bookseller Inventory # 47685

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