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Item Description: 1789. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Manuscript, Pages 27-28, 35-36, and 47-48 of Washington's own draft of his undelivered inaugural address. [written ca. January 1789]. 6 pp. on 3 leaves, 7 x 9 in. "This Constitution, is really in its formation a government of the people"George Washington understood that the new government's success, as had the Constitutional Convention's, rested squarely on his shoulders. He also knew that everything he did as the first president would set precedents for future generations. He wrote privately about the promise, ambiguity, and tension of high office, and these same themes are woven throughout his original, undelivered inaugural address. Would the government work as intended, or suffer death from a thousand cuts? Still, the former Commander in Chief recognized the nation's potential, as well as the honorable men who had come together to build the Constitution.The three unique leaves-six pages-offered here are written entirely in Washington's hand. They include assertions that government power is derived from the people, and a highly significant section of the Address explicitly arguing that the Constitution is subject to amendment and, by implication, advocating the adoption of the Bill of Rights. They also include the oratorical climax of the address-arguably the most visionary and impassioned passage of the address. In the first leaf offered here, pages 27 and 28, Washington reasserts the Jeffersonian notion of the power being derived from the people:Although the agency I had in forming this system, and the high opinion I entertained of my Colleagues for their ability & integrity may have tended to warp my judgment in its favour.[it is my] fixed belief that this Constitution, is really in its formation a government of the people; that is to say, a government in which all power is derived from, and at stated periods reverts to them--and that, in its operation, it is purely, a government of Laws made & executed by the fair substitutes of the people alone. The election of the differt branches of Congress by the Freemen, either directly or indirectly is the pivot on which turns the first wheel of the government--a wheel which communicates motion to all the rest.Later, on pages 35 and 36 offered here, Washington expresses his faith in the American people and their ability to judge good leaders:until the people of America shall have lost all virtue; until they shall have become totally insensible to the difference between freedom & slavery; until they shall have been reduced to such poverty of spirit--as to be willing to sell that preeminent blessing, the birthright of Freemen, for a mess of pottage; in short, until they shall have been found incapable of governing themselves and ripe for a master those consequences, I think, can never arrive.He then hints at Continental expansion:My present object is to point out the means of encreasing & perpetuating the happiness of the people of that Country. To embrace this object the mind must dilate with the dimentions of a Continent, and extend with the revolutions of futurity. The New world is now becoming a stage for wonderful exhibitions. The discovery of another Continent, in some unknown Seas, could alone afford a Theatre for political actions.Finally returning to the virtue of an informed citizenry:The preliminary observation that a free government ought to be built on the information and virtue of the people will here find its proper place. Happily our Citizens are remarkably instructed by education, docile to duty [meaning 'willing to receive instruction, teachable,' i.e., be good citizens] & ingenious for making improvements.Finally, in the third leaf offered here, pages 47 and 48, Washington seeks to assure the nation of the ability to amend the Constitution (recognizing early demands for a Bill of Rights) and asks that the system be given a chance to work before being altered. He ends this leaf with a call to pay the nation'. (See website for full description). Autograph Manuscripts. Bookseller Inventory # 23845-47

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Item Description: Engraved by G. Vandergucht, London: Published according to Act of Parliament, 1 September 1754. Panoramic engraving on 4 folio sheets, each approximately 29½ x 23½ in. Condition: Each sheet with old horizontal crease approximately 9 inches from top edge, small losses to sky area unobtrusively mended, the crease neatly reinforced from verso with archival tissue; each with small triangular patches of discoloration in margins (from early mount). Other light, mostly marginal browning or light patches (not affecting images). Sheet 1: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to platemark in upper portion; upper right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue; Sheet 2: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to within platemark; Sheet 3: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to platemark in lower half; lower right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue; Sheet 4: ample margins at right, top and bottom, left side trimmed at or just outside platemark; right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue. A GRAND PROSPECT OF PHILADELPHIA: A FINE COPY OF THE 1754 SCULL-HEAP EAST PROSPECT FIRST STATE, with misspelling "Skull" at top and bottom of sheet 3. Founded in 1680 on a site between the Delaware and the Schuylkill Rivers, Philadelphia was ideally situated for trade and by the mid 18th century, it had become the principal port on the Atlantic coast as well as the commercial and administrative hub of William Penn's province of Pennsylvania. In 1750, Thomas Penn, son of the founder, requested "a perspective view of the city," as a dramatic advertisement to attract more entrepreneurs, merchants and settlers to the city. George Heap, an accomplished local artist, undertook a detailed rendering, from the perspective of the New Jersey side of the Delaware. In 1752, he and the surveyor of the province, Nicholas Scull, advertised for advance subscribers to an engraving after Heap's drawing. But as he was about to sail for London to have his rendering engraved on copper, Heap suddenly died. Scull took over the project and, in London, entrusted the drawing to the highly regarded Flemish-born engraver, Gerard Vandergucht (1696-1766). The completed engraving was on a monumental scale, requiring four large folio sheets, when joined measuring 82 x 20 inches. It accurately depicts the bustling waterfront of Philadelphia, a windmill on an island and many sailing vessels, pennants flying, plying the broad river. The Penn family coat-of-arms is shown at the bottom of sheet 3, along with dedication to proprietors Thomas and Richard Penn. Sheet 4 features a detailed key, identifying streets, the Courthouse, the Statehouse (Independence Hall), a large number of steepled churches and the recently founded Academy (later the University of Pennsylvania). As Martin Snyder has written, "the use of almost seven feet of paper to portray less than a mile of waterfront, from present-day South Street to Vine Street permitted the details that is its great feature." The Scull-Heap print provides a unique view of the city that would become, a few years later, the seat of the Continental Congress and later, the capital of the newly independent nation. The grand image--the largest and most artistically significant view of any American city of its period--proved tremendously popular, and an initial press run of 500 copies was soon followed by a second of 250 copies (these with the corrected "Scull reading). Clearly, as Snyder writes, "the ravages of time upon such a giant and indeed unwieldy picture readily account for its extreme rarity today." The Scull-Heap engraving was not held in many important collections (Thomas W. Streeter, the Hon. J. William Middendorf, Laird Park, Pflaumer, Jay T. Snider) and we have located only six copies in American institutions: Colonial Williamsburg; Historical Society of Pennsylvania (2 copies, one in poor condition); Independence National Historic Park; New York Pub. Bookseller Inventory # 001894

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George Jacob Beck (1748-1812)

Published by Gouche on paper in gold-leaf Frame, Circa 1795, Provenance: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt, Detroit, Michigan, Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York (1795)

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Item Description: Gouche on paper in gold-leaf Frame, Circa 1795, Provenance: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt, Detroit, Michigan, Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, 1795. This incredibly rare watercolor by George Jacob Beck is the first view of Washington, DC and Georgetown. Beck completed this work at approximately the same time as his views of the Potomac River, commissioned by President George Washington in 1796 for his home in Mount Vernon. Washington was impressed by the artist’s ability to capture the beauty of his boyhood home and the site of his many land surveys, and purchased two companion views of Beck's Great Falls of the Potomac. As evidenced in his views of the Potomac and Georgetown, Beck’s careful attention to light lends an ethereal quality to his landscapes. The figures in this view are bathed in the last light of dusk while the creeping shadows blot out the trees in the foreground. This work served served as the original drawing for the aquatint Georgetown and Federal City, or City of Washington published in 1801 by Atkins and Nightengale, as well as for the decoration on Staffordshire china. Lauded as one of the greatest predecessors of the Hudson River School and a favorite artist of President Washington, George Jacob Beck’s artwork continues to be highly sought after today. Though listed in the 1806 Lexington directory as a "Portrait Painter," Beck is most famous for his landscape work, which unquestionably contributed to the popularity of American views during the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. He was the most experienced, if not the first of the early landscape painters to work in the United States. Six of his American views, engraved and published by T. Cartwright of London, have been collector's items for some time. This quote, taken from Virgil Barker of American Painting in 1950, demonstrates Beck’s enduring influence within the art world: "Among all the foreign-trained who came here in the Federal era, George Beck had the most substantial and the best mastered landscape style.Beck's superiority in craft enabled him to render the rocks with a strength sufficient to withstand the turbulent rush and falling weight of water.[and] to construct the forms of rock and tree, to give the solidity of earth, and even.to modulate values toward a distant horizon." Beck’s early philosophy is accessible in the captions he wrote for two of his views published in the European Magazine and London Review in 1785. In these captions he expressed his lifelong interest in science and mathematics. "Portraits of men, things and places," according to Beck, serve the same purpose in the mimetic arts as experiments do in science. He added that the usefulness of drawing is linked to its ability to provide insight into nature’s secrets. A transitional figure, Beck was caught between eighteenth-century rational thought and nineteenth-century Romanticism. With his pioneering depictions of the American wilderness, he formed a stylistic bridge to Cole’s romantic landscapes. He leaned toward the aesthetic of the picturesque, sacrificing accuracy for pleasing effects and celebrating ruggedness over smoothness. This view is taken from above Georgetown on the district side, and shows Analostan Island (the former designation for Theodore Roosevelt Island) in the Potomac River, with the Georgetown in the background on the left. In the far distance are the new boundaries of the city of Washington, founded jest several years before Beck painted this view. In 1791, President Washington selected the location for the new capital, establishing the new federal city several miles away fromGeorgetown on the opposite bank of the Potomac. Georgetown, which had been established in 1751 when the Maryland Legislature purchased sixty acres of land for the town during the reign of George II of Great Britain, was situated on the fall line- the farthest point upstream to which oceangoing boats could navigate the Potomac River. Georgetown eventually became a thriving port, facilitating trade and shipments of tobacco and other goods from colonial Maryland. Georgetown was frequented by President Washington, who worked. Bookseller Inventory # 003054

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BECK, George Jacob (1748 – 1812).

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Item Description: 1795. Gouache and Watercolor on paper in gold leaf frame (15 ¾ x 20 ½ inches visible; 24 x 29 inches framed). THE FIRST VIEW OF DC AND GEORGETOWN DRAWN BY GEORGE WASHINGTON’S FAVORITE ARTIST This excellent view is taken from above Georgetown on the District side, and shows Analostan Island (the former designation for Theodore Roosevelt Island) in the Potomac River with Georgetown in the background on the left. This watercolor gouache is clearly a companion in style and subject of The Potomac River Breaking through the Blue Ridge and Great Falls of the Potomac, both circa 1796-1797), combining as it does topographical detail with a Romantic atmosphere. Both of these works were purchased in January 1797 from Beck’s agent, Samuel Salter. They were hung in the New Room at Mount Vernon, where they may still be viewed today. George Beck is one of the earliest professional English trained landscape painters in America. Among his ‘pioneering depictions of the American wilderness’, Georgetown and the city of Washington is an important and evocative portrait of the Nation’s capitol at its peak. Beck and his wife emigrated to America in 1795, drawn to the same newly settled wilderness, which Beck so successfully portrayed in his. The couple settled in Baltimore, Maryland, where Beck first painted his views of the Potomac River and achieved a tremendous amount of success. His fandom was ignited by the backing of George Washington, and following those commissions he won the patron-ship of William Hamilton, a well-known patron of English and American artists. From there Beck’s popularity skyrocketed, accumulating commission after commission. In 1798, Beck moved to Philadelphia and opened a drawing school for men and women to subsidize his income; while his wife opened a ladies’ seminary. Despite leaving there legacy on the bustling city, their stay in Philadelphia was short lived and they soon made their way towards the beautiful American Western Frontier (Pittsburgh, Niagara Falls, Ohio, Kentucky). "The newly settled wilderness held a great appeal for beck providing the opportunity of exploring relatively unspoiled nature while living in a social milieu where he and his wife could attract patrons and students. In Kentucky he developed a freer style, and his works increasingly celebrated the unspoiled richness of the frontier. They reveal his fascination with the subjective power and mystery of nature". (Olsen) For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna. Bookseller Inventory # 72NZ96

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BECK, George Jacob (1748 – 1812).

Published by c 1795 – 1798. (1798)

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Item Description: c 1795 – 1798., 1798. Gouache and Watercolor on paper in gold leaf frame (15 x 19 ½ inches visible; 24 x 29 inches framed). THE BIRTH OF WASHINGTON, D.C. An exceptionally fine original gouache on paper of the city of Washington taken from the Eastern branch of the Potomac River, looking north. This watercolor gouache is clearly a companion in style and subject of The Potomac River Breaking through the Blue Ridge and Great Falls of the Potomac, both circa 1796-1797), combining as it does topographical detail with a Romantic atmosphere. Both of these works were purchased in January 1797 from Beck’s agent, Samuel Salter. They were hung in the New Room at Mount Vernon, where they may still be viewed today. Lauded as one of the greatest predecessors of the Hudson River School and a favorite artist of President Washington, George Jacob Beck’s artwork continues to be highly sought after today. Though listed in the 1806 Lexington directory as a "Portrait Painter," Beck is most famous for his landscape work, which unquestionably contributed to the popularity of American views during the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. He was the most experienced, if not the first of the early landscape painters to work in the United States. He is considered one of the earliest professional English trained landscape painters in America. Among his ‘pioneering depictions of the American wilderness’, this view of the city of Washington is an important and evocative portrait of the Nation’s capitol at its peak. Beck and his wife emigrated to America in 1795, drawn to the same newly settled wilderness, which Beck so successfully portrayed in his. The couple settled in Baltimore, Maryland, where Beck first painted his views of the Potomac River and achieved a tremendous amount of success. His fandom was ignited by the backing of George Washington, and following those commissions he won the patron-ship of William Hamilton, a well-known patron of English and American artists. From there Beck’s popularity skyrocketed, accumulating commission after commission. In 1798, Beck moved to Philadelphia and opened a drawing school for men and women to subsidize his income; while his wife opened a ladies’ seminary. Despite leaving there legacy on the bustling city, their stay in Philadelphia was short lived and they soon made their way towards the beautiful American Western Frontier (Pittsburgh, Niagara Falls, Ohio, Kentucky). "The newly settled wilderness held a great appeal for beck providing the opportunity of exploring relatively unspoiled nature while living in a social milieu where he and his wife could attract patrons and students. In Kentucky he developed a freer style, and his works increasingly celebrated the unspoiled richness of the frontier. They reveal his fascination with the subjective power and mystery of nature". (Olsen) For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna. Bookseller Inventory # 72NZ97

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 13 1/4 x 19 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100208r

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COLLOT, Georges Henri Victor (1751-1805).

Published by Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826 [but printed in 1804-1805]. (1826)

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Item Description: Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826 [but printed in 1804-1805]., 1826. 3 volumes. 2 text volumes: 8vo (8 x 5 inches). Half-titles. Half tan calf, marbled boards, gilt (extremities rubbed); preserved in brown morocco backed slipcase and chemise. Atlas: Folio (15 x 12 inches). 4 letterpress leaves including the title-page and plate list in French and English. 11 fine folding engraved maps, 14 engraved plans, and 11 engraved plates (8 views, 3 figures of native Americans), all engraved by Tardieu (folding maps with some very mild offsetting, North America map with slight fold tear, paper flaw to Part II of Ohio River map with small loss to blank area, guards renewed, very mild occasional foxing or marginal spotting, text leaves toned). Contemporary half vellum, marbled paper boards uniform with text volumes, citron and red morocco lettering-pieces on the spine (extremities rubbed). Provenance: John B. Stetson, his sale Parke-Bernet, 14 April 1953, lot 207; sold by Henry Stevens in 1953 to Frank T. Siebert; text volumes purchased by Siebert from Maggs Bros., his sale, Sotheby's New York, Oct 28, 1999, lot 819; with the signed bookplate of Bruce McKinney loosely inserted, his sale 2nd December 2010, lot 150 A PARTICULARLY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE COPY WITH A SUPERB PROVENANCE of the first edition, in French, with the RARE atlas volume which accompanies Collot's account of his extensive survey of the Louisiana region, including his celebrated map on three sheets of the Ohio River. "The beautifully executed map of the Ohio River [on three sheets] depicts vividly the wilderness that this country was at the time of his journey" (Wagner-Camp). The other remarkable maps include a general map of North America; the course of the Ohio from its source to its junction with the Mississippi; the road from Limestone to Frankfort in Kentucky; a stretch of a branch of the river Juniata; a map of the course of the Mississippi from the Missouri to its mouth; a map of Illinois country; a map of the Missouri and of the higher parts of the Mississippi and the plain where the waters divide to run north-east to Hudson's Bay, north-north-west to the Frozen Sea, and south into the gulf of Mexico, and showing Mackenzie's route of 1789; a chart of the sources of the Mobile and of the Yazoo. Fine plans of most important forts are included: Erie, Niagara, Natchez, New Madrid or Anse a la Graisse, and Baton-Rouge. As are plans of the towns of Pittsburgh, St.-Louis, and a sketch of New Orleans. Collot, who served under Rochambeau during the Revolutionary War, was commissioned to make a reconnaissance of the Mississippi valley by Pierre Auguste Adet (1763-1834), French ambassador to the United States. He was to report of the political, economic and military situation in the region, which was under Spanish control, in anticipation of the reacquisition of Louisiana by France from Spain. But as a result of the Louisiana Purchase, however, the "work was printed, both in French . and English, but not published, at the time of Gen. Collot's death, which happened in 1805. More than twenty years afterwards, the whole impression came into the hands of M. Bertrand, an eminent publisher in Paris, who reserved 100 copies of the English and 300 of the French edition, and made waste paper of the remainder" (Rich, Bibliotheca Americana Nova, 2: p. 185). Howes C-601; Sabin 14460; Wagner-Camp 31a. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib547

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Woods, Colonel George)

Published by Pittsburgh (1784)

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Item Description: Pittsburgh, 1784. THE ONLY SURVIVING ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT OF THE FIRST PLAN OF THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH Pen and ink on parchment Sheet size: 13 ½" x 17 ¼" Provenance: Senator James Ross (1762-1847); Private collection, Pittsburgh. References: John Melish, Travels through the United States of America in the Years 1806-07 (Philadelphia, 1812) 54; John W. Reps, The Making of Urban America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965) 204-206; ibid., Town Planning in Frontier America (Columbia & London: University of Missouri Press, 1980) 181; Bruce Buvinger, Origin, Development, and Persistence of Street Patterns in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh, 1972). This remarkable document is the only available original manuscript of the first survey and town plan of Pittsburgh and stands as the Penns' charter of Pittsburgh. Every deed issued by Penns' Philadelphia Land Office referred to it and all subsequent real estate ownership in Pittsburgh's "Triangle" is based on this document. Three copies of the original map are recorded, but the other two were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1845, which burned nearly one thousand buildings and leveled nearly half of Pittsburgh. This copy survived as it was held outside the city, at the residence of Senator James Ross. The map was used by Ross, at a Supreme Court of Pennsylvania trial, during 1841. In his recorded deposition he stated "I had it sent to me by the Proprietaries' agent at the trial of the Commonwealth vs. McDonald. This parchment draft I saw in said office of Proprietaries 40 years ago." A two-line attest of authenticity, located at the lower left of the plan, dated December 29, 1841 and signed by James Ross, states "this is the parchment draft referred to in my deposition." On the verso of the document is an Allegheny County clerk's notation, "Recorded in the office for recording deeds . . .," dated February 19, 1842. A copy of the document (complete with Ross's attest of authenticity) is to be found in the Allegheny County plat book. The authenticity of the map has been further verified by Andrew E. Masich, president and CEO of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania who in an article for the Pittsburgh Tribune Review (Sunday, November 20, 2005) commented, " . . . it's a legitimate thing. It is one of the earliest maps of Pittsburgh." A settlement is recorded on the site, of what is now Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as early as circa 1760. On March 4, 1681, King Charles II signed the Charter of Pennsylvania and granted the territory to William Penn as payment of a loan in the amount of £16,000. Penn intended this to be a safe haven for persecuted Quakers, a religion he himself had converted to, but which was socially despised in Great Britain. By the eighteenth century, Pennsylvania also became a settlement for new immigrants to America, who found little opportunity in the already settled portions of the original colonies. However, there was little settlement of the western portion of the state due to constant Native American incursions. This was to change during the second half of the century. In 1754 the French and Indian War broke out. The Mississippi and Ohio Valleys had been under the control of the French and their defeat opened the path for settlement in western Pennsylvania. In 1758 Fort Duquesne, built at the strategic point where the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers meet the Ohio River, fell to the British and was renamed Fort Pitt. According to early accounts, a small community of 200 houses, grouped in a tiny grid of rectangular blocks fronting on to the Monongahela, had formed around the fort within two years. Most of the inhabitants were fur traders. Under the. Bookseller Inventory # 000943

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Pilote Americain Septentrional Pour les Côtes de: LE ROUGE, George
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Item Description: Chez Le Rouge, Rue des G[ran]ds Augustins, 1778-1779., 1778. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. ?Recevez. Monsieur, les remerciments de Académie Royale de la Marine. Il est certainement très utile de faire connaître les bons Ouvrages de Étrangers; il en est même d? un genre particulier, comme ceux qui tiennent aux details locaux qui ne peuvent etre faits que par eux.Les anglais seuls, par exemple, peuvent aujourd?hui nous procurer Les meilleures Cartes de l? Amerique septentrionale dont ils frequentent les côtes plus que toute autre nation. Je suis De Marguery, Secretaire Enseigne de Vaisseaux? The letter thanks Le Rouge for the charts, noting, ?It is certainly very useful to make known the good works of Foreigners? (i.e. the English), and goes on to state that the English have the best and most accurate maps and charts of North America. Although the work contains numerous interesting charts, such as the ?Plan de Boston?, ?Entrée de la Riviere d?Hudson?, and the large chart ?Riviere St Laurent?, two charts are of particular note: 1) ?Baye de Chesapeake?, a copy of Anthony Smith?s work first published the previous year by Sayer and Bennett in The North American Pilot. The chart superseded Hoxton?s work of 1735 and ?filled an important niche for the British in planning military strategy? (Prichard) during the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. 2) ?Port de Rhode Island et Narraganset Baye?, on this large two sheet chart Le Rouge incorporates information from both the Des Barres and Faden charts, with an inset of the plan of Newport, taken from that published separately by Faden in 1777, and based on Blaskowitz?s survey. A chart that must have proved invaluable to the comte d?Estaing. It is impressive just how quickly Le Rouge was able to bring the work to market, as many of the charts had only been published the previous year in London. This must be put down to three factors: his extensive links to the English (especially London) map trade; his contacts with American residence in Paris, such as Benjamin Franklin; and his fluent command of the English language. Such an advocate for learning a foreign language was Le Rouge, that in his introduction to, ?Parfait Aide de Camps. Paris, 1760?, he recommends learning ones own language well, then English and German ?so necessary in all wars?; the energy required for study would leave the young aide-de-camp with little for the seductive charms of ?les amourettes?, who brought nothing but destruction! We are unable to trace an example of the atlas for sale at auction in the past 30 years. The present example collates as per Shirley?s description of the example held in the British Library. Shirley cites two further institutional examples, both incomplete: that in the National Maritime Museum and [NMM 247 (lacks map of St Vincent)] and Library of Congress [Philips Atlases, 1210 (lacks map of Atlantic)]. To this we can add examples in Paris (BnF), Bavaria (BVB) and Boston (John Adams Library), also incomplete. One reason for the works rarity can be put down to the fact that it was quickly superseded by the ?Neptune Americo-septentrional?, a work sponsored by the Dépôt de la Marine, and published in 1780. Records note that in March 1780, 15 packets containing 17 maps from the Neptune were sent to the Comte Hector, director of the port of Brest. The more accurate state sponsored pilot, would soon come to dominate the market in France, and effectively end the production of Le Rouge?s work. Bookseller Inventory # 12011

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BUFFON, Georges Louis Marie Leclerc, Comte De (1707-1788).

Published by Paris: De l'Imprimerie royale, 1770-1786. (1786)

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Item Description: Paris: De l'Imprimerie royale, 1770-1786., 1786. 10 volumes, folio (18 1/2 x 13 1/4 in.; 464 x 343 mm). 973 fine hand-colored plates drawn and engraved by François Nicolaus Martinet under the supervision of Edme Daubenton, text within decorative borders. Contemporary half red straight-grained morocco (extremities scuffed, bookplates removed from the front paste-downs). Provenance: George M. Pflaumer. "Ranks still as one of the most important of all bird books from the collector's point of view" (Fine Bird Books). First edition, large paper issue, bound as often found without the 35 extra plates of animals, insects, and reptiles designed to illustrate ornithological volumes of Buffon's monumental "Histoire naturelle generale" (1749-1804). Buffon was appointed keeper of the "Jardin du Roi", later the "Jardin des Plantes", and the collection connected with it, the "Cabinet du Roi" in 1739. He augmented the collection of birds exponentially, increasing it to more than 800 species gathered from all four corners of the globe. In 1765 at Buffon's direction, Martinet began drawing and painting the collection, and engraved the plates under the supervision of Edme Daubenton. In1770 the first volume devoted to birds was published: "Its popularity was primarily assured by Buffon's great literary ability which allowed him to present even the most difficult topics in such sparkling style, in such a universally understandable form, and so fascinating a manner that, as was said, even ladies found amusement in reading about them.the special merit of the work is principally due to the fact that. it was the first to create interest in Nature and natural history in wide circles" (Anker). Buffon's "Oiseaux." was ultimately issued in four formats: the large and ordinary paper folio sets were issued with hand-colored plates by and after Francois Martinet. Quarto and twelve-mo issues were also produced, illustrated with a series of black and white plates drawn by de Seve. Anker 76; "Fine Bird Books" 83; McGill/Wood 267; Nissen IVB 158; Zimmer 104-106. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 000993

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COLLOT, Georges Henri Victor (1751-1805).

Published by Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826. (1826)

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Item Description: Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1826., 1826. Folio (13 x 9 4/8 inches). Letterpress title-page (small closed tear) and "explanation des planches" in French. 11 fine folding engraved maps, 14 engraved plans, and 11 engraved plates (8 views, 3 figures of native Americans), all engraved by Tardieu (one or two repairs to verso of folds, on or two spots). Modern calf backed 19th-century marbled boards (lacking free endpapers); modern brown morocco backed cloth clamshell box. Provenance: Ink library stamps of the French Ministry of Agriculture on the title-page and last plate. The RARE atlas volume to accompany Collot's account of his extensive survey of the Louisiana region, including his celebrated map on three sheets of the Ohio River: "The beautifully executed map of the Ohio River [on three sheets] depicts vividly the wilderness that this country was at the time of his journey" (Wagner-Camp). Collot's reconnaissance mission to the Mississippi valley was the brainchild of Pierre Auguste Adet (1763-1834), French ambassador to the United States. He was to report of the political, economic and military situation in the region, in anticipation of the reacquisition of Louisiana by France from Spain. Because of the Louisiana Purchase, however, the "work was printed, both in French . and English, but not published, at the time of Gen. Collot's death, which happened in 1805. More than twenty years afterwards, the whole impression came into the hands of M. Bertrand, an eminent publisher in Paris, who reserved 100 copies of the English and 300 of the French edition, and made waste paper of the remainder" (Rich, Bibliotheca Americana Nova, 2: p. 185). Howes C-601; Sabin 14460; Wagner-Camp 31a. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 002309

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 18 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100188r

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BECK, George Jacob (1748 – 1812).

Published by Circa 1795 – 1798. (1798)

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Item Description: Circa 1795 – 1798., 1798. Gouache and Watercolor on paper in gold leaf frame (16 ½ x 22 ½ inches visible; 21 x 27 inches framed). THE FIRST VIEW OF THE POTOMAC RIVER BY GEORGE WASHINGTON’S FAVORITE ARTIST This watercolor gouache is clearly a companion in style and subject of The Potomac River Breaking through the Blue Ridge and Great Falls of the Potomac, both circa 1796-1797), combining as it does topographical detail with a Romantic atmosphere. Both of these works were purchased in January 1797 from Beck’s agent, Samuel Salter. They were hung in the New Room at Mount Vernon, where they may still be viewed today. Lauded as one of the greatest predecessors of the Hudson River School and a favorite artist of President Washington, George Jacob Beck’s artwork continues to be highly sought after today. Though listed in the 1806 Lexington directory as a "Portrait Painter," Beck is most famous for his landscape work, which unquestionably contributed to the popularity of American views during the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. He was the most experienced, if not the first of the early landscape painters to work in the United States. He is considered one of the earliest professional English trained landscape painters in America. Beck and his wife emigrated to America in 1795, drawn to the same newly settled wilderness, which Beck so successfully portrayed in his. The couple settled in Baltimore, Maryland, where Beck first painted his views of the Potomac River and achieved a tremendous amount of success. His fandom was ignited by the backing of George Washington, and following those commissions he won the patron-ship of William Hamilton, a well-known patron of English and American artists. From there Beck’s popularity skyrocketed, accumulating commission after commission. In 1798, Beck moved to Philadelphia and opened a drawing school for men and women to subsidize his income; while his wife opened a ladies’ seminary. Despite leaving there legacy on the bustling city, their stay in Philadelphia was short lived and they soon made their way towards the beautiful American Western Frontier (Pittsburgh, Niagara Falls, Ohio, Kentucky). "The newly settled wilderness held a great appeal for beck providing the opportunity of exploring relatively unspoiled nature while living in a social milieu where he and his wife could attract patrons and students. In Kentucky he developed a freer style, and his works increasingly celebrated the unspoiled richness of the frontier. They reveal his fascination with the subjective power and mystery of nature". (Olsen) For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna. Bookseller Inventory # 72NZ98

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BROOKSHAW, George (1751-1823).

Published by London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812 [but plates watermarked 1822]. (1822)

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Item Description: London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812 [but plates watermarked 1822]., 1822. BROOKSHAW, George (1751-1823). Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most ESteemed Fruits at present cultivated in this Country; together with the Blossoms and Leaves of such as are necessary to distinguish the various sorts from each other. Selected principally from the Royal Gardens at Hampton Court, and the remainder from the most Celebrated Gardens round London. Accurately drawn and coloured from Nature, with full descriptions of their various qualities, seasons, &c. London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812 [but plates watermarked 1822]. Broadsheets (22 2/8 x 18 inches). With the author's printed slip explaining the absence of three pineapple plates, 1 page of index (frontispiece, title-page and dedication leaf with old vertical crease). 90 magnificent aquatints with stipple engraving by Brookshaw, printed in colors and finished by hand. Contemporary brown morocco, elaborately paneled in gilt and blind (attractively rebacked to style). Provenance: with the engraved armorial bookplate of famous bibliophile and Philadelphian Moncure Biddle (1882-1956) on the front paste-down Plates watermarked H.S. & S. 1822, text watermarked J.Whatman 1811. Originally published in parts between 1804 and 1812 and dedicated to the Prince Regent. Many of the specimens were taken from the Royal Gardens at Hampton Court and Kensington Gardens, among other great British gardens, and include: 256 varieties of fruit are depicted in the 90 plates, the subjects include 7 plates of Cherries; 10 of Plums or Apricots; 15 of Peaches and Nectarines; 5 of Pineapples; 17 of Grapes; 9 of Melons, 11 of Pears and 7 of Apples. George Brookshaw's splendid "Pomona Brittanica" is a masterpiece among 19th-century British flower books. The publication of the "Pomona" marked the re-emergence of the acclaimed artist into the public eye after a total disappearance of nearly a decade. Initially a cabinet-make specializing in painted furniture decorated with borders of flowers, Brookshaw appears to have abandoned this career at about the same time as he parted company with his wife and began living with Elizabeth Stanton, and under the assumed name of G. Brown (c.1794-1804). During this time he earned a living as a teacher of flower-painting and on the proceeds of his first painting manual "A New Treatise on Flower Painting", 1797. Characterized by the highest standards of production and artistic quality, the superb illustrations that Brookshaw drew and engraved for the "Pomona" remain perhaps the most sumptuous and distinctive of the early 19th century. This magnificent and stylistically unique work took Brookshaw nearly ten years to produce. Rivaled only by Dr. Robert Thornton's "Temple of Flora," Brookshaw's 'Pomona' is considered to be the finest British botanical work from a time when England dominated the field with a very large number of great books. Brookshaw's fine illustrations make excellent use of the rich, modulated tones that the aquatint process creates. The elegantly arranged and richly colored fruits emerge from deep brown backgrounds or float on a softly mottled light ground, creating a presence unlike that of any other botanical illustrations. Brookshaw asserts in the preface that the "Pomona Britannica" was an enduring work created for the enjoyment and edification of "succeeding generations." Nissen 244; Pritzel 1182. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 72nhr253

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EDWARDS, George (1694-1773).

Published by London: Rickaby for Gardiner & Robinson; Sidney, 1802-1806. (1806)

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Item Description: London: Rickaby for Gardiner & Robinson; Sidney, 1802-1806., 1806. 7 volumes in 4. Folio (18 2/8 x 11 2/8 inches). Text in English and French. 362 EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved plates with original hand-colour, including 37 PLATES IN COUNTERPROOF (some very occasional light spotting). FINE CONTEPORARY ENGLISH BINDING of green straight-grain morocco, elaborately decorated in gilt, including inner dentelles, with the gilt-stamped supra libros of John Proby on each front cover, all edges gilt. Provenance: with the supra libros of John Joshua Proby, first Earl of Carysfort (1751-1828) on each front cover; with the bookplate of John Taylor covered by the engraved armorial bookplate of E. Boehm on the front paste-down of each volume; Sir Abdy, his small library label on the front paste-down of volume one, his sale Paris, 11 June 1975, lot 107. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE, TALL AND ATTRACTIVE COPY, LIMITED TO 25 DELUXE COPIES, WITH MAGNIFICENTLY COLOURED PLATES, printed on paper watermarked "J. Ruse 1803" or "Ruse & Turners 1805". RARE. In his "Preface" to "Gleanings" Edwards writes: "Great parts of the prints in this present work were drawn and etched on the copper-plates immediately from the natural subjects which they represent; and many of the prints are coloured directly from nature, in their proper colours, by my own hand:; so that they may be deemed original drawings" (volume iv, page 9). In order to make these published images as close to the original watercolours as possible Robinson adopted the technique of counterproofing for 37 of the exquisite plates in this book: a method of "offset" printing whereby an image is printed from a freshly pulled print rather than from the copperplate. Counterproofs produce softer, lightly inked images with no platemarks, oriented in the same direction as Edwards'originals. John Joshua Proby, like his father before him, was a career politician. In 1789 he became joint guardian and keeper of the rolls in Ireland and was in Ireland when the rising broke out in 1798. He declared that the time was ripe for a union of Great Britain and Ireland, and on 21 April 1800 he described Pitt's measure as 'wise, politic, and advantageous to the two countries' (Cobbett, Parl. hist., 35.83). Carysfort wrote a pamphlet on parliamentary reform, published in 1783, and a collection of poems and dramatic works. He was 'esteemed a good and elegant scholar', but as a speaker 'his utterance is disagreeably slow, tedious and hesitating, perpetually interrupted by the interjections Ah! Ah!' (GEC, Peerage, 3.71). (G. F. R. Barker, rev. E. A. Smith for DNB). One of the most important of all eighteenth-century natural history works, "at its date of issue, the "Natural History" and "Gleanings" was one of the most important of all bird books, both as a fine bird book and as a work of ornithology. It is still high on each list" (Fine Bird Books). As a young man Edwards soon found himself in the company of the most influential natural historians, collectors and artists of the 18th-century. Among Edwards' first patrons was Sir Hans Sloane, he was taught to etch by the celebrated Mark Catesby (in 1754 he would publish the second edition of Catesby's "Natural History."), he worked with the Bartrams of Philadelphia and Linnaeus in Sweden. The first volume of "A Natural History of Uncommon Birds" was published to great acclaim in 1743, and gained him nomination for fellowship of the Royal Society although he withdrew his candidacy. Second and third volumes followed in 1747 and 1750 which won him the coveted Copley medal of the Royal Society. The last volume appeared in 1751 at which time he stated that age and infirmity precluded further work. However in 1758 he published the first volume of his "Gleanings of Natural History", the second in 1760, after which he sold his entire portfolio to the Marquess of Bute, ".resigned as bedell to the College of Physicians, and retired to a house in Plaistow. From there he still visited the college and the Royal Society and, stimulated by his drawings of South Ameri. Bookseller Inventory # 72nhr90

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100196r

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872).

Published by London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall [but Henry Bohn] (C. & J. Adlard, printers of text), 1844 [or 1845]. (1845)

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Item Description: London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall [but Henry Bohn] (C. & J. Adlard, printers of text), 1844 [or 1845]., 1845. Folio (23 4/8 x 18 4/8 inches). Letterpress title-page and 9 leaves of text, loose as issued (a bit thumbed, short marginal tears, one or two of which have been repaired). 25 handcolored lithographed plates after Catlin by Catlin and McGahey lithographed by Day and Haghe, plates printed before letters, heightened with gum arabic and mounted on card within ink-ruled frames loose as issued (plate one with a small stain, some plates with minor spotting, one or two mounts with small surface tears). Preserved in modern maroon morocco backed portfolio. Provenance: from the library of Gerald F. Fitzgerald, with his bookplate on the inside front cover of the portfolio, his sale, Sotheby's London, June 11, 2013, lot 59 First edition, third (first Bohn) issue, the first issue with the plates hand-coloured and mounted on card. George Catlin was the first artist to travel widely among the Plains Indians of North America and create an important body of paintings and graphics to illustrate their customs and artifacts. His purpose was both unselfish and romantic. He wanted, and labored unceasingly, to persuade his contemporaries that Native American culture should be honored and preserved. During the 1830's, Catlin gathered artifacts and turned his sketches and recollections of the prairie into paintings. In 1827, George Catlin, an illustrator from Philadelphia, became the first artist to attempt the perilous journey up the Missouri River, and the first to create visual records of his experiences traveling among the Plains Indians of North America. The artist himself best expressed his goal in the preface to the first edition of his North American Indian Portfolio: "The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." Over the next eight years, Catlin would travel extensively throughout the Western Plains of America doing just that, and accumulating his "Indian Gallery", which consisted of hundreds of oil paintings he executed presenting the appearances and customs of the 48 different tribes of Native Americans he encountered during his journey. Catlin began to display his Indian Gallery in 1837, touring it in the United States for the next two years before taking the show to London. Having established a name for himself with the success of the Indian Gallery, Catlin turned his attention to finishing his first book, "he Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians " which first appeared in the fall of 1841. This book was to become one of the most important works on American Indians published in the 19th century. Not only is Catlin's work a wonderful description of his extensive travels and his career as an artist painting scenes of Indian life in the Midwest, but the book also contains hundreds of his illustrations that portray many aspects of Indian life: Their costumes, ceremonies, dwellings, villages, buffalo hunts, games, etc. Three significant maps showing Indian tribe locations of the period around 1840 further augment the illustrative plates. Catlin's project filled a great need. After Lewis & Clark's celebrated expedition up the Missouri River into the Pacific Northwest, Europeans read avidly of the sights and experiences of the voyage. They traced the route followed by the explorers, using the map that accompanied the wildly popular printed volumes on the journey. But a crucial aspect was missing from the accounts of the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Without pictorial documentation, Europeans (and Americans) were unable to visualize the unbelievable journey. This lack meant that the people, landscape, and customs of the vast American frontier remained abstract ideas-and much less vividly imaginable-to anyone who had not personally experienced the voyage. When Catlin first issued his volume in 1844, his animated, colorful, sympathet. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib1149

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BROOKSHAW, George (1751-1823).

Published by London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812. (1812)

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Item Description: London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812., 1812. Broadsheets (23 ¼ x 18 ¼ inches). With the author's printed slip explaining the absence of three pineapple plates, 1 page of index (preliminaries with old vertical creases). 90 aquatints with stipple engraving by Brookshaw, printed in colors and finished by hand (one "Strawberry" plate with slight split at platemark). Contemporary crimson straight-grained morocco, elaborately decorated in gilt and blind (rebacked preserving the original spine). Plates watermarked H.S. & S. 1822, text watermarked J.Whatman 1811. Originally published in parts between 1804 and 1812 and dedicated to the Prince Regent. Many of the specimens were taken from the Royal Gardens at Hampton Court and Kensington Gardens, among other great British gardens, and include: 256 varieties of fruit are depicted in the 90 plates, the subjects include 7 plates of Cherries; 10 of Plums or Apricots; 15 of Peaches and Nectarines; 5 of Pineapples; 17 of Grapes; 9 of Melons, 11 of Pears and 7 of Apples. George Brookshaw's splendid "Pomona Brittanica" is a masterpiece among 19th-century British flower books. The publication of the "Pomona" marked the re-emergence of the acclaimed artist into the public eye after a total disappearance of nearly a decade. Initially a cabinet-make specializing in painted furniture decorated with borders of flowers, Brookshaw appears to have abandoned this career at about the same time as he parted company with his wife and began living with Elizabeth Stanton, and under the assumed name of G. Brown (c.1794-1804). During this time he earned a living as a teacher of flower-painting and on the proceeds of his first painting manual "A New Treatise on Flower Painting", 1797. Characterized by the highest standards of production and artistic quality, the superb illustrations that Brookshaw drew and engraved for the "Pomona" remain perhaps the most sumptuous and distinctive of the early 19th century. This magnificent and stylistically unique work took Brookshaw nearly ten years to produce. Rivaled only by Dr. Robert Thornton's "Temple of Flora," Brookshaw's 'Pomona' is considered to be the finest British botanical work from a time when England dominated the field with a very large number of great books. Brookshaw's fine illustrations make excellent use of the rich, modulated tones that the aquatint process creates. The elegantly arranged and richly colored fruits emerge from deep brown backgrounds or float on a softly mottled light ground, creating a presence unlike that of any other botanical illustrations. Brookshaw asserts in the preface that the "Pomona Britannica" was an enduring work created for the enjoyment and edification of "succeeding generations." Nissen 244; Pritzel 1182. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 002013

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 20 1/2 x 14 3/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100194r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100195r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 17 1/2 x 12 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100199r

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Item Description: xJust months before the Declaration of Independence, he relies Òon your zeal and attachment to the cause of American libertyÓHe argues, ÒWe are to consider ourselves either in a state of peace or of war with Great Britain. If the former, why are our ports shut up, our trade destroyed, our property seized, our towns burnt, and our worthy and valuable citizens led into captivity, and suffering the most cruel hardships?ÓMany Americans were reluctant revolutionaries, and it took a while for the reality and fact of the Revolution to work a change of mind. They may have supported the American arguments and opposed the British ministry, but they clung to the idea that the mother country and her colonies could yet reconcile short of American independence. In their mindset, they understood that military actions were being taken, and may even have been required, but they were in denial and were unprepared to accept that the colonies were in a war with Great Britain that must lead to a split. This sentiment was strongest in the colonies south of Virginia and in New York. The revolutionaries leaders knew that winning the war was going to need broad support in all the colonies. Thomas Paine wrote ÒCommon SenseÓ and then ÒThe CrisisÓ in 1776 and for the exact purpose of converting his hesitating fellow citizens, and Washington shared his concern, and at the same time as Paine the need arose for him to echo PaineÕs sentiments in his own words.From the outbreak of the Revolution in April 1775, New York was on the minds of both the British and Americans. Its location was strategic, as it constituted the connecting link between New England, the hotbed of rebellion, and the rest of the colonies. Adding to this was its status as an important and central port lying right on the Atlantic Ocean. But the first priority for the Americans was Boston, which was in actual possession of the British, and which the Americans had under siege. When George Washington was appointed commander of American forces, he went immediately to Cambridge, Mass., arriving in July 1775. He set about devising a way to dislodge the British from the city, but he and his officers found it difficult to agree on one. Then a young Continental Army colonel from Boston named Henry Knox suggested that cannon might be used to drive the British from the town, so Washington sent Knox to Crown Point and the recently captured Fort Ticonderoga in northern New York to retrieve all their cannon and mortars and bring them to Boston. Knox and his men moved the cannons 300 miles in fifty-six days with the help of oxen and ice sledges. They arrived outside Boston on January 25, 1776, with the huge haul of 59 cannons. When powder for the cannon finally arrived, the Americans began firing on Boston on March 2, and on March 4 mounted the largest guns on Dorchester Heights. British commander William Howe wanted to send troops up Dorchester Heights to dislodge the guns, but a snowstorm prevented the assault. Fearing his position was untenable because of the certainty of bombardment, he decided to leave Boston. On March 17, 1776, known afterward as "Evacuation Day," 11,000 British troops left the city by boat. Washington marched into Boston on March 18, but there was little time for rejoicing. He rightly suspected that the British would next head for New York City.Anticipating this, and knowing that British possession of New York City would threaten vital American lines of communication between New England and the rest of the colonies, in January 1776 Washington dispatched General Charles Lee to New York City to survey and plan for the cityÕs defense. Lee then worked with Washington to devise a multilayered plan in which troops would be stationed and ready to fight in different parts of the city. On March 27, soon after the British evacuated Boston, Washington took his next action relating to New York, writing Congress of his plans for detaching regiments of the Continental Army in Cambridge to New Yo. Bookseller Inventory # 11529

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 14 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100184r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 18 11/16 x 13 1/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100189r

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

Published by Geo. Catlin, London (1845)

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Item Description: Geo. Catlin, London, 1845. Folio. 20pp. 25 hand colored lithographs, each trimmed to the image and mounted on card within an ink ruled frame, as issued. Text in cloth-backed yellow paper wrappers, plates loose as issued. Within a half red morocco over period cloth covered boards portfolio, original red morocco label on the upper cover, yellow endpapers and flaps. Housed in a red morocco backed box. The Indian Portfolio in the First Bohn Issue: a wonderful copy of Catlin's famous color plate book of scenes of Indian life in the American West. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. In a famous passage from the preface, Catlin describes how the sight of several Indian chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their vanishing way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. He painted around 600 highly realistic and powerfully projected portraits of Indians, carefully recording their costume, culture and way of life. In addition to publishing the present work, Catlin also spent from 1837 to 1852 touring the United States, England, France and Holland with his collection of paintings, examples of Indian crafts and accompanied by representative members of the Indian tribes. A financial reversal in 1852 meant that he lost the collection, but he spent his later years making several trips to South and Central America, sketching the natives there. This copy is the first edition, third issue (otherwise known as the first Bohn issue) and is the most desirable and deluxe issue of the first edition. Like other folio color plate books of the time, the first edition of the Portfolio was published in three formats: tinted on paper, hand-coloured on paper and a deluxe issue, hand-coloured and trimmed and mounted on card in the style of the original watercolours. This final issue, published at 10 guineas, is the most rare and desirable. The production of the Portfolio so taxed Catlin's resources that, near bankuptcy, he sold his copyrights to Bohn, who first issued the card version in early 1845, a few months after Catlin's paper issue. This issue, on card instead of regular paper and overseen by the master of color plate production, Henry Bohn, is generally considered superior in coloring to the colored issue on paper. The illustrations, which show buffalo and other hunting scenes, sports and dances, and portraits of individual Indians, are based closely on originals painted by Catlin in the West in 1834-36, and exhibited in his Indian Gallery in London. The Indian Portfolio reproduced these pictures within the lavish format of a British color plate book of the era, and today the plates are probably the best known Catlin images. The Indian Portfolio is second only to Bodmer's atlas to Maximilian's Travels , as the most magnificent work on the American West in the 19th century. It is one of the premier color plate books relating to America. The plates are as follows: 1) "North American Indians." 2) "Buffalo Bull Grazing." 3) "Wild Horses, at Play." 4) "Catching the Wild Horse." 5) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 6) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 7) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 8) "Buffalo Dance." 9) "Buffalo Hunt, Surround." 10) "Buffalo Hunt, White Wolves attacking a Buffalo Bull." 11) "Buffalo Hunt, Approaching a Ravine." 12) "Buffalo Hunt, Chasing Back." 13) "Buffalo Hunt, Under the White Wolf Skin." 14) "Snow Shoe Dance." 15) "Buffalo Hunt, on Snow Shoes." 16) "Wounded Buffalo Bull." 17) "Dying Buffalo Bull, in Snow Drift." 18) "The Bear Dance." 19) "Attacking the Grizzly Bear." 20) "Antelope Shooting." 21) "Ball Players." 22) "Ball-Play Dance." 23) "B. Bookseller Inventory # 29687

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 20 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100190r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 20 5/8 x 13 5/8 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100192r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. Size: 19 x 13 3/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100193r

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Les Jardins Anglo-Chinois: LE ROUGE, George

LE ROUGE, George Louis (1712-90, publisher)

Published by Le Rouge, Paris (1789)

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Item Description: Le Rouge, Paris, 1789. 21 parts, oblong folio. (11 1/4 x 17 inches). 493 engraved plates (including engraved titles and text, many folding) [complete]. [Bound with:] Traite des Edifices, Meubles, Habits, Machines et Ustensiles des Chinois . Par M. Chambers. Paris: Le Rouge, 1776. 30pp. [And with:] Description du Douzieme Cahier des Jardins Anglais du Sieur Le Rouge. [caption title]. Paris: 1784. 8pp. Contemporary calf, covers bordered in blind, flat spine divided into compartments, red morocco lettering piece in the second, marbled endpapers Provenance: Archibald Philip Primrose, Earl of Rosebery (armorial bookplate) A very rare complete set of Le Rouge's monumental work on garden design and decoration: "the most important engraved work concerning the history of European gardens during the 18th century" (Bernard Korzus): from the library of the Earls of Rosebery. Art historian Bernard Korzus writes: "the most voluminous and most important engraved work concerning the history of European gardens during the 18th century. As a whole this publication contains the most complete collection of views of gardens of Anglo-Chinese or any other mode. These images document the history of gardening over an exceptionally long period, from the projects of George Loudon at the start of the 18th century for the alterations to Wanstead, to the gardens of Monceau and Ermenonville. The plates also contain a quantity (in part the work of Le Rouge alone) of generic general plans, details of parterres, stands of trees, mazes with views of pavilions, temples, kiosks, and other ornaments in classical, neogothic or chinese style. Also included are numerous representations of bridges, menageries, aviaries, theatres and amphitheatres, grottoes, 'hermitages', cascades, fountains, garden sculpture and other things of that type. Not only are we offered a large overview of the most important gardens, but also many of the second rank gardens of England, France and Germany" (approximate translation, from B. Korzus's essay "Georges Louis Le Rouge Un cartographie franco-allemand du XVIIIe siecle" in V. Royet Le Rouge, Les Jardins anglo-chinois [Paris: 2004], p.50). Georges-Louis Le Rouge (1707-1790) was a famous cartographer, engraver and architect. He was born in Hanover, the son of the French architect Louis Rémy de la Fosse. From 1736 he lived in Paris, where he obtained a position as military and civil engineer of King Louis XV and Louis XVI. Le Rouge began to publish 'Jardins Anglo-Chinois' in 1775 and continued the project over a period of fourteen years. Included are plans, views and details, often adapted from earlier printed sources, and occasionally from original drawings, of Stowe, Kew, Blair Atholl, Buckingham, Richmond, Chiswick, Esher, Claremont, Windsor, and Wilton, Roissy, Saint-James at Neuilly, Marly, the Trianon, Desert de Retz, numerous other locations in and around Paris, Schwetzingen, Wurzburg, Steinfurt and Orianenbaum. Of the greatest historical importance are the quite detailed plans of a number of gardens that have either disappeared completely or been altered to a point where the original intentions of the garden designer are no longer evident (such as the garden at Raincy which now only exists on paper). The theoretical works and garden design manuals on which Le Rouge also drew include works by Thomas Collins Overton, William Wrighte and of course William Chambers. On a more exotic note, and typifying the vogue for chinoiserie, the 99 plates of the gardens and palaces of the Qianlong Emperor of China (in cahiers 14 to 17) are particularly valuable, and evidently much more carefully executed than the versions published by Chambers. All of the plates were engraved after Chinese woodblock illustrations or paintings. Prominently featured is the Yuan-ming-yuan Imperial garden in the north of Peking. In 1744 the Emperor had commissioned an album of 40 scenes that was painted by Shen Yuan and Tang Dai. Woodblock versions of the album were printed in the Yu zhi Yuan ming yuan shi, an illu. Bookseller Inventory # 29323

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DE L'ISLE, Guillaume (1675-1726) - HOMANN, Johann Baptist (1663-1724) - SEUTTER, George Matthaeus (1678-1757).

Published by Paris, Nuremberg, and Augsburg: 1700-1747 (1747)

Used First Edition

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Item Description: Paris, Nuremberg, and Augsburg: 1700-1747, 1747. 2 volumes. Folio (21 x 13 inches). Manuscript index leaves at the beginning of each volume. 150 double-page engraved maps, including some folding, with original hand-colour in full, in part and in outline (some separations to folds of the larger maps, volume II with extensive waterstaining, edges occasionally frayed). Contemporary calf (worn). A unique composite atlas containing 34 maps by De L'Isle issued from his earliest address at the "Rue des Canettes", and 39 from his subsequent address, and 3 without address. Amongst them are twelve of the most important 18th-century maps of America: The rare first state of L'Amerique Septentrionale. 1700; the rare first state of L'Amerique Meridional ., 1700; the rare first edition of Carte du Paraguay du Chili du Detroit de Magellan &c. 1703; Carte de la Terre Ferme du Perou, du Bresil et du Pays des Amazones., 1703; Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississippi., 1703 - "towering landmark along the path of Western cartographic development" (Wheat); Carte du Canada ou de la Nouvelle France et des Decouvertes qui y ont ete faites. 1703; Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi., Juin, 1718 - one of the most important and influential maps of the 18th Century, the foundation map for all the later maps of the Mississippi and the whole West of the United States -; Americae Mappa generalis., 1746; Homann's Amplissimae Regionis Mississipi Seu Provinciae Ludoviciana a P.P. Ludovico Hennepin Francise Miss in America Septentrionali Anno 1687.; Regni Mexicani Novae Hispaniae Ludovicianae N. Angliae, Carolina, Virginiae, et Pensylvania necnon Insularum Archpelagi Mexicani in America Septentrionali . no date; d'Anville's Mappa Geographica, complectens I. Indiae Occidentalis partem mediam circum Isthmum Panamensem, II. Ipsumq Isthmum, III. Ichnographiam praecipuorum locorum & portuum ad has terras pertinentium., no date; and Homann's Nova Anglia Septentrionali Americae implantata Anglorumque coloniis florentissima Geographice exhibita. Paris: chez l'Auteur Rue des Canettes pres de St. Sulpice 1 - Mappemonde., 1700. Double-page and folding engraved double-hemisphere world map, with original hand-colour in outline, the title within an elaborate allegorical rococo cartouche above and between the spheres, the imprint in a smaller one below (edges a little frayed) 9 - L’Asie., 1700 11 - Carte de Tartarie., 1706. Folding 12 - Carte es Indes et de La Chine., 1705. Folding (separations at folds) 14 - Carte de la Turquie de l'Arabie et de la Perse, 1701. Folding (edges a little frayed) 19 - L'Afrique., 1700 (short marginal tear, one or two stains) 20 - In Notitiam Ecclesiasticcam Africae., 1700. Folding 25 - L'Amerique Septentrionale. 1700. A fine engraved map of North and Central America with original hand-colour in outline, the title within an elaborate allegorical asymmetrical rococo cartouche upper right, the scale and Avertissement within another rococo cartouche upper left. The rare first state of De L'Isle's map of North America, the title cartouche with the cartographer's title given as "Geographe" and his address as "Rue des Canettes". This is the first map to go back to showing California as a peninsula, after a long period of it being shown on maps as an island. The 'new' cartography was based on the reports rof Fra. Eusebio Kino, and is De L'Isle's earliest map of America, remaining one of the most influential maps of North America for many years. Schwartz & Taliaferro in an article in the Map Collector (Issue 26, pp. 2-6, March 1984) described an example of this map in Austria, in an earlier state in which the mouth of the Mississippi River is shown in Texas, rather than as on the present copy in Louisiana slightly west of longitude 280º. However, that stater state is known in only a very few examples.Tooley referred to this map as "a foundation map.and the first to revert to a peninsular form of Califor. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib1402

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