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The War between the United States and: KENDALL, George Wilkins

KENDALL, George Wilkins (1809-1867) and Carl NEBEL (1805-1855).

Published by New York: D. Appleton & Company; Philadelphia: George S. Appleton, 1851. (1851)

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First Edition
Softcover

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From: Arader Galleries - Aradernyc (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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About this Item: New York: D. Appleton & Company; Philadelphia: George S. Appleton, 1851., 1851. Folio (22 4/8 x 17 inches). One lithographic map "Map of the Operations of the American Army in the Valley of Mexico in August and September 1847" 12 hand-coloured lithographic plates heightened with gum arabic by Adolphe Jean-Baptiste Bayot after Carl Nebel (some spotting throughout and occasional light marginal staining). Original blue linen, printed paper label on the front cover (some staining, a bit scuffed at the extremities). Provenance: with the small library label of the Litchfield Historical Society on the front paste-down. First edition, variant issue in cloth binding, also published in paper wrappers, loose in a portfolio, and in half cloth. This extraordinary book was the work of two men who were masters of their respected trades. George W. Kendall was the pre-eminent war reporter of the day, and Carl Nebel was one of the finest artists working in the Southwest able to transpose chaotic scenes with a vivid eye for detail and composition. THE FINEST LITHOGRAPHIC VIEW OF TEXAS PRODUCED IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY George W. Kendall was a printer, a respected newspaperman, and a journalist whose account of his Santa Fe Trail adventures in 1841-1842, following his surrender to the Mexicans, was first published as letters in serial publications. His story, once released in book form in 1844, was so compelling that it went through many contemporary editions and upwards of 40000 copies were sold through the conclusion of the Mexican War in 1847. Kendall supported the admission of Texas to the Union, and was in Texas as a reporter when he heard the news of the Mexican War. "Despite his earlier experiences, he accompanied the armies of Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott into Mexico as a war correspondent. While there, he captured a cavalry flag, was wounded in the knee, and earned widespread praise for devising, with Lumsden, methods for swift transmission of his war dispatches to the "Picayune". The men fitted out a small steamer as a press ship; it met other ships bearing war news, readied the news for printing, and took it to New Orleans, where workers at the "Picayune" rushed it to the press. It was circulated in the city and transmitted by swift express riders to other newspapers in the country. Kendall's biographer Fayette Copeland says that his Mexican War journalism made him famous as "the first modern war correspondent and the most widely known reporter in America in his day" (p. 150). "Before leaving Mexico, Kendall had agreed to write a book about the war that a [German] artist, Carl Nebel, was to illustrate. In 1848 Kendall sailed to France to work on the book, which was published in New Orleans and New York in 1851 as "The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated". While in France, Kendall wrote frequent dispatches for the "Picayune" about the revolution of 1848. He also met and in 1849 married Adeline de Valcourt, a woman twenty-two years his junior, with whom he had four children. In 1852 he and his family moved to Texas near the present city of New Braunfels, where he became a sheep farmer at his ranch, "Post Oak" (Mary Ann Wimsatt for ADNB). "The very best American battle scenes in existence" (Bennett) Nebel, originally from Hamburg in Germany, travelled to America and lived in Mexico from 1829 until 1834. In 1836, he published in Paris his celebrated work "Voyage pittoresque et archéologique dans la partie la plus intéressante du Méxique", with 50 lithographs and an introduction by renowned explorer Alexander Humboldt. Nebel's magnificent plates in this volume depict the major battles of the Mexican War in dramatic and glorious detail. References: Bennett, American-Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books. Howes K76. Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War. Seller Inventory # 72lib1158

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The War between the United States and: KENDALL, George Wilkins

KENDALL, George Wilkins (1809-1867) and Carl NEBEL

Published by Plon Brothers of Paris for D. Appleton & Co. and George S. Appleton, New York & Philadelphia (1851)

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Hardcover

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From: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA) (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Plon Brothers of Paris for D. Appleton & Co. and George S. Appleton, New York & Philadelphia, 1851. Folio. (21 3/4 x 17 inches). 12 fine hand-coloured lithographic plates, heightened with gum arabic, by Bayot (11) or Bayot & Bichebois (1) after Nebel, printed by Lemercier in Paris, 1 lithographed map. Expertly bound to style in half dark green morocco over publisher's green cloth covered boards, upper cover lettered in gilt A first-hand report, in words and pictures, of the first offensive war fought by the United States: the first and only edition, with superb hand-coloured lithographed plates of one of the most important pictorial works relating to the Mexican-American War. Kendall was America's first great war correspondent, and an ardent proponent of the necessity of America's war with Mexico. When hostilities broke out, he went at once to the Rio Grande where he joined with the Rangers, and later attached himself to the Scott expedition. For this work he keyed his text to the individual plates and the combination affords a detailed illustrated account of each battle. The plates are the work of the German artist, Carl Nebel, who painted each of the twelve major clashes of the war. Kendall notes in his preface that "Of the twelve illustrations accompanying his work. the greater number were drawn on the spot by the artist. So far as regards the general configuration of the ground, fidelity of the landscape, and correctness of the works and buildings introduced, they may be strictly relied upon. Every reader must be aware of the impossibility, in painting a battle scene, of giving more than one feature or principal incident of the strife. The artist has ever chosen what he deemed the more interesting as well as exciting points of each combat. in the present series of illustrations the greatest care has been taken to avoid inaccuracies." The authors of Eyewitness to War wrote approvingly that the present work "represents the climax of the confluence of journalism and lithography on the prints of the Mexican war" and that Nebel's images are "the eyewitness prints that must be compared against all others." For the text Kendall drew on "the official reports of the different commanders and their subordinates," but "was present at many of the battles" and "personally examined the ground on which all save that of Buena Vista were fought" (for information on this he relied on a Captain Carleton). The plates are titled: Battle of Palo-alto; Capture of Monterey; Battle of Buena Vista; Bombardment of Vera-Cruz; Battle of Cerro gordo; Assault of Contreras; Battle of Curubusco; Molino del Rey - attack upon the molino; Molino del Rey - attack upon the casamata; Storming of Chapultepec - Pillow's attack; Storming of Chapultepec - Quitman's attack; Gen. Scott's entrance into Mexico. It is interesting to note that while the work was published by D. Appleton in New York and Philadelphia, the lithographs were produced in Paris. Both Kendall and Nebel felt that the Paris lithographers alone were qualified to do justice to their images and they both spent some time in Europe overseeing the production of the work, for which Kendall and Nebel shared all the costs. A contemporary reviewer described the work as follows: "We have never seen anything to equal the artistic skill, perfection of design, marvelous beauty of execution, delicacy of truth of coloring, and lifelike animation of figures . They present the most exquisite specimens ever exhibited in this country of the art of colored lithography; and we think that great praise ought to be awarded to Mr. Kendall for having secured such brilliant and beautiful and costly illustrations for the faithful record of the victories of the American army" (review in the New Orleans Picayune, 15 July 1850). Bennett, p. 65; Haferkorn, p. 47; Howes K76; Raines p,132; Sabin 37362; Tyler, Prints of the West , p.78. Seller Inventory # 28793

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The War between the United States and: KENDALL, George Wilkins

KENDALL, George Wilkins (1809-1867) and Carl NEBEL (1805-1855).

Published by New York: D. Appleton & Company; Philadelphia: George S. Appleton, 1851. (1851)

Used
First Edition
Softcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Arader Galleries - Aradernyc (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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Price: US$ 31,000.00
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Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.

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About this Item: New York: D. Appleton & Company; Philadelphia: George S. Appleton, 1851., 1851. Folio (22 4/8 x 17 2/8 inches). One lithographic map "of the Operations of the American Army in the Valley of Mexico in August and September 1847", 12 EXCEPTIONALLY fine hand-colored lithographic plates heightened with gum arabic by Adolphe Jean-Baptiste Bayot after Carl Nebel (one or two instances of marginal spotting, affecting the image on one plate, title-page and text leaves a bit spotted). Original blue linen, printed paper label on the front cover (some staining, a bit scuffed, endleaves creased). FIRST EDITION, VARIANT ISSUE IN CLOTH BINDING, also published in paper wrappers, loose in a portfolio, and in half cloth. This extraordinary book was the work of two men who were masters of their respected trades. George W. Kendall was the pre-eminent war reporter of the day, and Carl Nebel was one of the finest artists working in the Southwest able to transpose chaotic scenes with a vivid eye for detail and composition. THE FINEST LITHOGRAPHIC VIEW OF TEXAS PRODUCED IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. George W. Kendall was a printer, a respected newspaperman, and a journalist whose account of his Santa Fe Trail adventures in 1841-1842, following his surrender to the Mexicans, was first published as letters in serial publications. His story, once released in book form in 1844, was so compelling that it went through many contemporary editions and upwards of 40000 copies were sold through the conclusion of the Mexican War in 1847. Kendall supported the admission of Texas to the Union, and was in Texas as a reporter when he heard the news of the Mexican War. "Despite his earlier experiences, he accompanied the armies of Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott into Mexico as a war correspondent. While there, he captured a cavalry flag, was wounded in the knee, and earned widespread praise for devising, with Lumsden, methods for swift transmission of his war dispatches to the "Picayune". The men fitted out a small steamer as a press ship; it met other ships bearing war news, readied the news for printing, and took it to New Orleans, where workers at the "Picayune" rushed it to the press. It was circulated in the city and transmitted by swift express riders to other newspapers in the country. Kendall's biographer Fayette Copeland says that his Mexican War journalism made him famous as "the first modern war correspondent and the most widely known reporter in America in his day" (p. 150). "Before leaving Mexico, Kendall had agreed to write a book about the war that a [German] artist, Carl Nebel, was to illustrate. In 1848 Kendall sailed to France to work on the book, which was published in New Orleans and New York in 1851 as "The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated". While in France, Kendall wrote frequent dispatches for the "Picayune" about the revolution of 1848. He also met and in 1849 married Adeline de Valcourt, a woman twenty-two years his junior, with whom he had four children. In 1852 he and his family moved to Texas near the present city of New Braunfels, where he became a sheep farmer at his ranch, "Post Oak" (Mary Ann Wimsatt for ADNB). "The very best American battle scenes in existence" (Bennett) Nebel, originally from Hamburg in Germany, travelled to America and lived in Mexico from 1829 until 1834. In 1836, he published in Paris his celebrated work "Voyage pittoresque et archéologique dans la partie la plus intéressante du Méxique", with 50 lithographs and an introduction by renowned explorer Alexander Humboldt. Nebel's magnificent plates in this volume depict the major battles of the Mexican War in dramatic and glorious detail. References: Bennett, American-Nineteenth Century Color Plate Books. Howes K76. Kurutz & Mathes, The Forgotten War. Seller Inventory # 72lib957

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Results (1 - 3) of 3