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Jt) Koolik, Marilyn Gold; Judy Levy

Published by Jerusalem; Israel Museum (1982)

Used Softcover First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Dan Wyman Books, LLC (Brooklyn, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

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About this Item: Jerusalem; Israel Museum, 1982. Original Wraps. 12mo. 66 pages. 19 cm. First edition. Catalog of an exhibition held at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Feb. 1982. Research and text by Marilyn Gold Koolik; English editing and translation by Judy Levy. Profusely illustrated, some in color. "The spice box has taken a large variety of forms and has inspired craftsmen to fantasy and often to whimsy. Among the Ashkenazi Jews it often took the form of a fortified tower. .The tower form could be imitated from a local tower or church steeple, surrounded by a balustrade, surmounted with a pennant and carrying a clock face indicating the conclusion of the Sabbath. It was executed in silver, sometimes engraved to resemble masonry, and later in filigree. Human and animal figures were placed around the tower: biblical worthies, soldiers, musicians, various synagogal officials such as the shohet (ritual slaughterer) with his knife, the scribe with his pen and inkwell, the Schulklopfer with his hammer (who woke worshipers for morning prayers) , or sometimes a Jew holding a beaker of wine and performing Havdalah. A variant of the tower form was executed in northern Italy in the 18th century, where it was covered with delicate filigree work, studded with semiprecious stones and adorned with enamel plaques depicting scenes from the Bible. Spice boxes were also made in many other forms, such as animals, fish, birds, flowers and fruit, and even windmills. There was also the simpler form of round, square, or rectangular boxes. On occasion the spice box was combined with the taperholder used in the Havdalah ceremony. " (EJ 2008) Subjects: Spice boxes (Jewish liturgical objects) - Exhibitions. Muzeon Yisrael (Jerusalem) Exhibitions. Light wear to wraps, some pencil marks throughout, otherwise clean. Good condition. (ART-22-1) Xxx. Seller Inventory # 33375

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Koolik, Marilyn Gold; Judy Levy

Published by Jerusalem; Israel Museum (1982)

Used Softcover First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Dan Wyman Books, LLC (Brooklyn, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 30.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

About this Item: Jerusalem; Israel Museum, 1982. Original Wraps. 12mo. 66 pages. 19 cm. First edition. Catalog of an exhibition held at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Feb. 1982. Research and text by Marilyn Gold Koolik; English editing and translation by Judy Levy. Profusely illustrated, some in color. "The spice box has taken a large variety of forms and has inspired craftsmen to fantasy and often to whimsy. Among the Ashkenazi Jews it often took the form of a fortified tower. .The tower form could be imitated from a local tower or church steeple, surrounded by a balustrade, surmounted with a pennant and carrying a clock face indicating the conclusion of the Sabbath. It was executed in silver, sometimes engraved to resemble masonry, and later in filigree. Human and animal figures were placed around the tower: biblical worthies, soldiers, musicians, various synagogal officials such as the shohet (ritual slaughterer) with his knife, the scribe with his pen and inkwell, the Schulklopfer with his hammer (who woke worshipers for morning prayers) , or sometimes a Jew holding a beaker of wine and performing Havdalah. A variant of the tower form was executed in northern Italy in the 18th century, where it was covered with delicate filigree work, studded with semiprecious stones and adorned with enamel plaques depicting scenes from the Bible. Spice boxes were also made in many other forms, such as animals, fish, birds, flowers and fruit, and even windmills. There was also the simpler form of round, square, or rectangular boxes. On occasion the spice box was combined with the taperholder used in the Havdalah ceremony. " (EJ 2008) Subjects: Spice boxes (Jewish liturgical objects) - Exhibitions. Muzeon Yisrael (Jerusalem) Exhibitions. Very good condition. (ART-22-1A) Xx. Seller Inventory # 33376

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