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Published by Needlecraft Ala Mode (1989)

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Softcover

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From: The Book Faerie (Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Needlecraft Ala Mode, 1989. Soft cover. Condition: Very Good. Craft booklet. Very good condition, light cover wear. Cup, Tissue Box Cover, Door Hanger, Switchplate Cover, Book Cover, Bell Pull, Bookend, Box, Garland, Picture Frame, Bookmark. Book. Seller Inventory # 019436

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Published by Needlecraft Ala Mode (1990)

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About this Item: Needlecraft Ala Mode, 1990. Soft cover. Condition: Very Good. Craft booklet. Very good condition, edgewear. Angel garland, tissue box cover, napkin rings, door know cover, switchplate cover, canister. Book. Seller Inventory # 019444

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Pollard, Jno. Garland

Published by Thomas Y Crowell Company, New York (1935)

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Hardcover

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From: Hedgehog's Whimsey BOOKS etc. (Newport, NH, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Thomas Y Crowell Company, New York, 1935. Hard cover. Seibel, Fred O. (Illustrated by). (illustrator). 118 p. 20 cm. Cartoon style Black ink drawings. Red cloth covers, black titles. A humorous listing, alphabetically, of words defined by their connotations, inferences true or false, some people draw from words. Coining the word "connotary", Pollard began to collect phrases while a professor at the College of William and Mary. Later when Governor of Virginia, 1930-1934, he sent out a printing to friends and others, requesting they add others. Samples: "Compliments--Lies in full-dress"; "Debt--A thing we run into but can't get out of faster than a crawl. " Fair. No dust jacket. Signed by previous owner. Pages pretty clean w/ occasional small stains. Cover, endpapers soiled, foxed; rear free end paper half missing. Had been owned by "Roxy Dunbar, Troy, Ala--" stylishly printed. 4th printing of revised & enlarged 3rd edition. Seller Inventory # Alibris.17970000670

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2017)

ISBN 10: 1331227925 ISBN 13: 9781331227922

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2017. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # APC9781331227922

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2017)

ISBN 10: 1331227925 ISBN 13: 9781331227922

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2017. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # APC9781331227922

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2017)

ISBN 10: 1331227925 ISBN 13: 9781331227922

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2017. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # LIE9781331227922

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United States

Published by U.S. Government Printing Office (1945)

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First Edition

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From: JERO BOOKS AND TEMPLET CO. (SANTA MONICA, CA, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1945. PAPERBACK. Condition: Good in Wraps. 1st Edition. First Edition. Paperback. Stamped by previous owner W. M. Garland. This was Brigadier General William C. Garland copy. General Garland was born in 1916, in Barnesville, Ga., where he attended high school and junior college at Gordon Military College. During this period he served over four years with the Georgia National Guard. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., in May 1942, and immediately entered pilot training at the Greenville Aviation School, Ocala, Fla. He completed pilot training and received his pilot wings at Turner Field, Ga., in March 1943, and completed B-17 transition training at Sebring, Fla., in April 1943. Please Note: (THIS ITEM WILL NOT BE SHIPPED INTERNATIONALLY IF PURCHASED VIA AMAZON.) During World War II, General Garland served with the 401st Bombardment Group stationed in England and flew 32 combat missions in B-17 bomber aircraft. In June 1945 he returned to the United States and subsequently was assigned to Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz., as commanding officer of the Davis-Monthan West Camp. In October 1945 General Garland went to Colorado Springs, Colo., and was assigned to Headquarters Second Air Force as chief of Operations and Training Division, and in 1946 became operations and training staff officer with the Fifteenth Air Force. In 1948 he was assigned as commander of the 32nd Bombardment Squadron, Smokey Hill Air Force Base, Kan. After graduation in June 1950 from the Air Command and Staff School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., he was assigned to Headquarters Strategic Air Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., as requirements officer and later served as chief, Programs Division, Directorate of Plans. General Garland was transferred to Madrid, Spain, in April 1954, where he served in the Plans Section of the Joint U.S. Military Group and in November was named chief of staff of the group. In October 1956 he became chief of staff of the Sixteenth Air Force in Spain. He returned to the United States in May 1957, and was assigned to Lockbourne Air Force Base, Ohio, as deputy commander of the 91st Strategic Wing and later of the 376th Bombardment Wing. In August 1958 he became commander of the 97th Bombardment Wing, Biggs Air Force Base, Texas, and from December 1958 to July 1961 he served as commander of the 98th Bombardment Wing, Lincoln Air Force Base, Neb. General Garland entered the National War College, Washington, D.C., in 1961, and following graduation was assigned as chief of staff, Second Air Force, Barksdale Air Force Base, La. During the National War College assignment he obtained his master's degree in international affairs from The George Washington University. From March 1964 to August 1965 he was commander of the 12th Strategic Aerospace Division at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. In August 1965 he became deputy director of information, and in June 1967 he assumed duties as director of information, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force. He became commander of the 1st Strategic Aerospace Division, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., in August 1969. He is a command pilot. His military decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Air Force Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters and Army Commendation Medal. Size: 4to. Paperback. Seller Inventory # 010474

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2018)

ISBN 10: 0656118768 ISBN 13: 9780656118762

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2018. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # APC9780656118762

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2018)

ISBN 10: 0656118768 ISBN 13: 9780656118762

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2018. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # APC9780656118762

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Caleb Huse

Published by Forgotten Books (2018)

ISBN 10: 0656118768 ISBN 13: 9780656118762

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About this Item: Forgotten Books, 2018. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Supplies for the Confederate Army: How They Were Obtained in Europe and How Paid For Discipline was almost at an end at the University, and in seeking ways and means for restoring it, the attention of the Faculty and Trustees was directed to the Virginia Military Institute which had been in successful operation for about fifty years. As this institution had been organized by a grad uate of West Point, and in some respects resembled the United States Military Academy, it was hoped that in Ala bama good results might be secured by the adoption of similar methods. Military drill is taught at the present time in many schools and colleges, but the intention of the Alabama University authorities was not merely to drill students, but to hold them under military restraint, as is effectually done at West Point, and, I may add, as cannot be done in any college designed to qualify young men to become civilian members of a great republic. West Point and Annapolis have proved themselves noble institutions for the purpose for which they were designed that of training young men to become officers over other men but the mission of these schools is not to fit young men for civil life. Their methods cannot be grafted upon literary or technical civil institutions, and it is not desirable that they should be applied to civil colleges or schools of any kind. But the University of Alabama was a military college so far as concerned discipline, and to this end I was given a Colonel s commission by the Governor of the State, with two assistants, one a major, the other a captain. Tents, arms and infantry equipments were purchased of the United States Government, and a uniform similar to that of the West Point cadets was adopted. The students were assembled on the first of Sep tember, and a camp established on the University grounds. Drills were inaugurated at once and regular camp duties were required and performed. Everything seemed to be progressing very satisfactorily till one day, some three weeks after the pitching of the camp, the President of the University (dr. Garland) desired to see me at his Office. On entering I found him and a trusted professor awaiting my coming, with disturbed looks. No time was wasted in the preliminaries; Dr. Garland came to the point at once by telling me that there was a mutiny brew ing in my camp which it would be impossible for me to quell. He then explained that the cadets were dissatisfied because I was a northern-born man; that they called me a d d Yankee, and intended running me out of the State. He thought they would be successful, for the ringleaders were Old students who had given a great deal of trouble before I came, and, what made the matter worse, these students were sons of in?uential men in the State, and the mothers of the mutineers were encouraging them. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # LIE9780656118762

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About this Item: CUPSA. SIN LOCALIZAR NI DATARL, . CARTONE IMPORES.CAJA EDITORIAL. Condition: BUEN ESTADO. NOVELA. NORTEAMERICA. ESTADOS UNIDOS. 804 PGS,//PARA VER DETALLE DE GASTOS Y FORMAS DE ENVIO HACER CLIC EN LIBRERIA Y CONDICIONES DE VENTA///. Size: 23X16. Seller Inventory # 35607

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Cason, Clarence [Clarence Elmore Cason], 1896-1935. J. Edward Rice [James Edward Rice] (illustrator).

Published by Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press [UNC Press], 1935. (1935)

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About this Item: Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press [UNC Press], 1935., 1935. First edition (not stated per publisher's usual practice). xvi, 186 pages. Hardcover: H 22.25cm x L 14.5cm. Dust jacket rubbed with tears and some wear at edges, shallow chipping at spine head with large chip at front panel's bottom right, light soiling to panels, usual color fading and toning to spine panel with title lettering near head faded/dulled; dj now presented in a mylar Brodart protector. Light green cloth with brown lettering to front board and spine. Reddish-brown top edge; light soiling and foxing to fore-edge and bottom edge. Foxing to endpapers; front pastedown has four-line ink non-authorial gift inscription "Aug 1, 1935 | Rhoda Ellison, | Centreville, Ala, | From Uncle Raymond" mostly hidden underneath dj's front flap; small discreet bookseller ticket at front free endpaper recto's bottom left corner "Studio Book Shop | Birmingham, Ala." Interior text pages are clean. Binding is firm. A very good copy in a good+ dust jacket. With b/w plates (most being photographs credited to James Edward Rice) including frontispiece all on unpaged leaves and Foreword by the author. Features ten chapters titled as: "It Never Snows;" "Shadows of the Plantation;" "Garlands of Straw;" "Pulpit and Pew;" "Politics as a Major Sport;" "Fascism: Southern Style;" "Black Figures in the Sun;" "The Machine's Last Frontier;" "They Are Not All Monsters;" and "The Philosopher's Stone." Cason's 90° IN THE SHADE was succinctly summarized for the 1983 reprint as "the classic examination of the character of Alabama and the South by a native son." Acquired from the estate of Dr. Rhoda Coleman Ellison (1904-2005) who taught at Montgomery, Alabama's Huntingdon College from 1930 to 1971 chairing the school's English department from 1959 to 1971 and thereafter appointed professor emerita. Ellison authored several Alabama history books including an authoritative local history "Bibb County, Alabama: The First Hundred Years, 1818-1918.". Seller Inventory # D17-6504

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Craik, Dinah Maria (née Mulock)

Published by Paris : Librairie Hachette et Cie (1879)

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From: Lirolay (Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Paris : Librairie Hachette et Cie, 1879. Condition: Very Good. First Edition. ~ Édition originale française du roman «Two Marriages: John Bowerbank's wife & Parson Garland's daughter» (1867) ~ Demi percaline de l'époque, titre doré sur le dos, tranches mouchetées ~ 311p ~ 19x12x2cm. ~ Très Bon état / Additional images available/. Seller Inventory # 9129B

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Ala Grodzinsky

Published by Garland Science (2008)

ISBN 10: 0815341547 ISBN 13: 9780815341543

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Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Irish Booksellers (Portland, ME, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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About this Item: Garland Science, 2008. Condition: New. book. Seller Inventory # M0815341547

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Eloise at Christmastime: KNIGHT, Hilary, illustrator;

KNIGHT, Hilary, illustrator; THOMPSON, Kay

Published by New York: Random House, 1958 (1958)

Used
Signed
First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: David Brass Rare Books, Inc. (Calabasas, CA, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: New York: Random House, 1958, 1958. Signed By The ArtistEloise Takes Christmas By StormTHOMPSON, Kay. Eloise at Christmastime. Drawings by Hilary Knight. New York: Random House, 1958. First printing, signed by Hilary Knight on the preliminary leaf. Quarto (10 7/8 x 7 7/8 in; 278 x 200 mm). Unpaginated (24 ff). Exuberantly illustrated throughout with many double-page spreads. Publisher's red glazed pictorial boards. Illustrated endpapers. In first issue dust jacket coded 9-58 (Sept. 1958). Minimal wear at spine extremities otherwise a fine copy in the original (price-clipped, otherwise fine) color pictorial dust jacket. Housed in a scarlet linen slipcase.Kay Thompson (1909-1998) is best known today as the creator of the Eloise children's books but she began her career as a composer, musician, actress, singer, and vocal coach to such stars as Judy Garland, Lena Horne, Frank Sinatra, and June Allyson. Thompson lived at the Plaza Hotel in New York City - home to Eloise. The books were partly inspired by the antics of her goddaughter, Liza Minnelli, daughter of Judy Garland and film director Vincente Minnelli. But later, when asked if this was true Thompson replied, "I am Eloise." The four books in the series, illustrated by Hilary Knight, are Eloise (Simon & Schuster, 1955), Eloise in Paris (Simon & Schuster, 1957), Eloise at Christmastime (Random House, 1958) and Eloise in Moscow (Simon & Schuster, 1959). Each follows the adventures of the precocious six-year-old Eloise. All were bestsellers upon release and have been adapted into television projects. She also composed and performed a Top 40 hit song, "Eloise" (Cadence Records, 1956). Film buffs will recall Thompson as Maggie Prescott, the flamboyant, Diana Vreeland-like editor of the fashion magazine, Quality, in Funny Face (1957) starring Fred Astaire as a photographer ala Richard Avedon, which opens with Thompson's now famous showpiece number, "Think Pink!". Seller Inventory # 02674

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