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Lee, Kwang-kyu

Published by Jimoondang International (2003)

ISBN 10: 1931897042 ISBN 13: 9781931897044

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About this Item: Jimoondang International, 2003. Condition: Very Good. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. Seller Inventory # GRP93215965

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Lee, Kwang-kyu

Published by Jimoondang International (2003)

ISBN 10: 1931897042 ISBN 13: 9781931897044

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About this Item: Jimoondang International, 2003. Hardcover. Condition: Good. Item may show signs of shelf wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. Includes supplemental or companion materials if applicable. Access codes may or may not work. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer service is our top priority. Seller Inventory # mon0000815969

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1992)

ISBN 10: 0804721580 ISBN 13: 9780804721585

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1992. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . Brand New Book. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group of persons linked through exclusively male ties (agnatically) to an ancestor who lived at least four generations. Seller Inventory # AAJ9780804721585

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Korean Family Kinship: Kwang-kyu, Lee

Kwang-kyu, Lee

Published by Jipmoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea (1997)

ISBN 10: 8930350038 ISBN 13: 9788930350037

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About this Item: Jipmoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea, 1997. Cloth. Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. Edition not stated. Probable first. 8vo. 256 pages. Illustrated with tables. Bibliography. Glossary. Index. Cased in dark-green cloth with all stamping in gilt. Cloth placemarker bound in. Officially withdrawn from our library with minimal external indicators. Appears not to have circulated. A sound copy in very good condition in like dust jacket. Korean Studies Series No. 3. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Ex-Library. Seller Inventory # 001484

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1992)

ISBN 10: 0804721580 ISBN 13: 9780804721585

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1992. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . Brand New Book. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group of persons linked through exclusively male ties (agnatically) to an ancestor who lived at least four generations. Seller Inventory # AAJ9780804721585

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1992)

ISBN 10: 0804721580 ISBN 13: 9780804721585

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1992. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an orga. Seller Inventory # BZE9780804721585

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Lee Kwang-Kyu

Published by Jimoondang (2003)

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About this Item: Jimoondang, 2003. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Hardcover and dust jacket in very good + condition. Seller Inventory # JBD96000xxcc

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Roger Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press

ISBN 10: 0804721580 ISBN 13: 9780804721585

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About this Item: Stanford University Press. Paperback. Condition: New. 244 pages. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japans descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group of persons linked through exclusively This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Seller Inventory # 9780804721585

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Christies

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About this Item: Condition: Good. Christie's - Hong Kong, Sale title - Asian Contemporary Art, Sale date - 25th November 2007, No. of lots - 138, No. of pages - 295, Illustrated in colour INDEX Al YAMAGUCHI ANANT JOSHI ANITA DUBE ATSUSHI SUWA ATUL BHALLA ATUL DODIYA AYA TAKANO BAHK SEON GHI CAI GUO QIANG CAI ZHISONG CAO XIAODONG CHEN YU CHIHARU NISHIZAWA CHOI BYUNG JIN CHOI SO YOUNG CHOI YgONG GEOL CHUN KWANG YOUNG CUI XIUWEN DANIEL LEE (LI XIAOJING) DEBBIE HAN DING FANG DING Yl EISUKE SATO FANG LIJUN FUCO UEDA FUMIO YAMAZAKI GAO MINGFENG GIGI SCARIA GU WENDA GUAN YONG GUO HUAIREN GUO JIN GUO WEI SB HAN UN SUNG HASEGAWA JUN HE JIAN HEZUBIN HIDEKI SATOH HIROSHI OHASHI HIROYUKI AOYAMA HIROYUKl MATSUURA HONG KYONGTACK HOU CHUN-MING HUANG MING-CHE HUANG YAN HUANG YONGPING HWANG SOON IL IKKI MIYAKE JEONG BO YOUNG Jl DACHUN Jl WEN YU JUSTIN PONMANY KANEDA SHOWICHI KANG HYUNG KOO KAWORI WATANABE KENICHI YOKONO KIM DONG YOO KIM EUN JIN KIM TSCHANG KOJI TANADA KOREHIKO HINO KUO WEI KUO (GUO WEI GUO) LEE BYUNG HO LEE HO RYON LEE JAE SAM LEE JUNG WOONG LI HUI LI SHAN LIEN CHIEN-HSING LIN JUWig LIN TIANMIAO LING JIAN LIU HONG WEI LIU JIANHUA LIU LIGUO LIU WEI LIU XIAO DONG LIU YE LUO QING MA DESHENG MA LIUMING MANJUNATH KAMATH MANSI BHATT MAO XUHUI MIN BYUNG HUN MOHAMMAD ALI TALPUR N S HARSHA NAOKI SASAYAMA NORIYUKI NAKAYAMA OH CHI GYUN OH SOON HWAN OSCAR OIWA SACHIO PAIK NAM JUNE PAN DEHAI PARK MIN JOON PROBIR GUPTA Ql ZHILONG QIU ANXIONG QIU SHIHUA QIU YACAI RAVINDER REDDY REENA SAINI KALLAT REIKO TAMURA REN RONG RHEE DA RIEKO SAKURAI RIYAS KOMU RYOJI SUZUKI RYOKO KATO RYOKO KIMURA SATOSHI FURUI SATOSHI WATANABE YANG DIN SHEN XIAOTONG (YANG DENGXIONG) SHI CHONG YANG MAO LIN SHICHINOCHE MASARU SHIN DONG SHIN YOUNG SHINJI OGAWA SHOKO IMANO SONG JIN HWA SONG MYUNG JIN SU XINPING SUBODH GUPTA SZETO KEUNG SZETO LAP TV SANTHOSH TAHERA SEHER SHAH TAKAO SAKAI TAKASHI MURAKAMI TALHA RATHORE TAMIE OKUYAMA TATEISHI TIGER TETSUTARO KAMATANI TETSUYA ISHIDA THUKRAL & TAGRA TOMOKO KONOIKE TOMOKO SAWADA TONY WONG WANG GUANGYI WANG KEPING WANG MAI WANG QINGSONG WASEEM AHMED WEI DONG WENG FEN WEI RONG XIAO FAN (RU XIAO FAN) XIE DONGMING XU WEN TAO YANG QING YANG SHAOBIN YAYOI KUSAMA YE YONGQING YEHTZUCHI Yl HWAN KWON YIM TAE KYU YIN ZHAOYANG YOON BYUNG ROCK YOSHIHIKO SATO YU PENG TI YUE MINJUN ZENG CHUANXING ZENG FANZHI ZENG HAO ZHAN WANG ZHANG HONGTU ZHANG HUAN ZHANG XIAOGANG ZHENG ZAIDONG (CHENG TSAI-TUNG) ZHOU CHUNYA ZHU WEI Weight: 1345g. Seller Inventory # 36550

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Lee Kwang-kyu

Published by Jimoondang Publishing Co, Seoul (2000)

ISBN 10: 8988095189 ISBN 13: 9788988095188

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About this Item: Jimoondang Publishing Co, Seoul, 2000. Hard Cover. Condition: As New. Dust Jacket Condition: As New. First Edition. 260 pages. Book and Jacket appear to have hardly been read and are both in As new condition throughout. This Book Summarises The History Of 5.5 Million Overseas Koreans And Their Lives In More Than 140 Nations In The World. Seller Inventory # 130490

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Kwang-kyu, Lee

Published by Jipmoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea (1997)

ISBN 10: 8930350038 ISBN 13: 9788930350037

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About this Item: Jipmoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea, 1997. Hard Cover. Condition: Near Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: VG+. First Edition. 256 pages in excellent condition. Blue cloth with gilt titles. Corners not bumped. Green/orange DJ with illustrations and green titles. Very light wear on corners and edges. Scarce. NEAR FINE/VG+. Seller Inventory # 209350

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Published by University of Washington Press

ISBN 10: 0295992166 ISBN 13: 9780295992167

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About this Item: University of Washington Press. Paperback. Condition: New. 350 pages. Dimensions: 8.9in. x 5.9in. x 0.9in.Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea 1910-1945 highlights the complex interaction between indigenous activity and colonial governance, emphasizing how Japanese rule adapted to Korean and missionary initiatives, as well as how Koreans found space within the colonial system to show agency. Topics covered range from economic development and national identity to education and family; from peasant uprisings and thought conversion to a comparison of missionary and colonial leprosariums. These various new assessments of Japans colonial legacy may open up new and illuminating approaches to historical memory that will resonate not just in Korean studies, but in colonial and postcolonial studies in general, and will have implications for the future of regional politics in East Asia. Hong Yung Lee is the author of several texts including Politics of Chinese Cultural Revolution. Clark W. Sorensen is director of the Korean Studies Department at the University of Washington. He is the general editor for the Center for Korea Studies Publication Series and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. Yong-chool Ha is the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Social Science at the University of Washington. He has edited or co-authored many books including New Perspectives on International Studies in Korea. The other contributors include Mark E. Caprio, Keunsik Jung, Dong-No Kim, Keong-Il Kim, Ki-seok Kim, Kim Kwang-ok, Yong-Jick Kim, Seong-cheol Oh, and Myoung-Kyu Park. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Seller Inventory # 9780295992167

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1982)

ISBN 10: 0804711356 ISBN 13: 9780804711357

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1982. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an orga. Seller Inventory # BZE9780804711357

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Kwang-kyu, Lee

Published by Jimoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea (2000)

ISBN 10: 8988095189 ISBN 13: 9788988095188

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About this Item: Jimoondang Publishing Company, Seoul, Korea, 2000. Hard Cover. Condition: Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: VG+. 260 pages in excellent condition. Blue cloth with gilt titles. Corners not bumped. Blue DJ with illustrations and brown titles. Very light wear on corners and edges. Scarce. FINE/VG+. Seller Inventory # 208992

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1982)

ISBN 10: 0804711356 ISBN 13: 9780804711357

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1982. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group of persons linked through exclusively male ties (agnatically) to an ancestor who liv. Seller Inventory # APC9780804711357

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Roger L. Janelli, Dawnhee Yim Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press, United States (1982)

ISBN 10: 0804711356 ISBN 13: 9780804711357

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About this Item: Stanford University Press, United States, 1982. Hardback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japan s descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group of persons linked through exclusively male ties (agnatically) to an ancestor who live. Seller Inventory # APC9780804711357

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Roger Janelli

Published by Stanford University Press

ISBN 10: 0804711356 ISBN 13: 9780804711357

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About this Item: Stanford University Press. Hardcover. Condition: New. 244 pages. Dimensions: 8.4in. x 5.7in. x 0.9in.The study of ancestor worship has an eminent pedigree in two disciplines: social anthropology and folklore (Goody 1962: 14-25; Newell 1976; Fortes 1976; Takeda 1976). Despite obvious differences in geographical specialization and intellectual orientation, researchers in both fields have shared a common approach to this subject: both have tried to relate the ancestor cult of a given society to its family and kin-group organization. Such a method is to be expected of social anthropologists, given the nature of their discipline; but even the Japanese folklorist Yanagita Kunio, whose approach to folk culture stems from historical and nationalist concerns, began his work on ancestors with a discussion of Japans descent system and family structure (Yanagita 1946). Indeed, connections between ancestor cults and social relations are obvious. As we pursue this line of analysis, we shall see that rural Koreans themselves are quite sophisticated about such matters. Many studies of ancestor cults employ a combination of social and psychological approaches to explain the personality traits attributed to the dead by their living kin. Particular attention has long been given to explaining the hostile or punitive character of the deceased in many societies (Freud 1950; Opler 1936; Gough 1958; Fortes 1965). Only recently, however, has the popularity of such beliefs been recognized in China, Korea, and Japan (Ahern 1973; A. Wolf 1974b; Kendall 1977; 1979; Yoshida 1967; Kerner 1976; Lebra 1976). The earliest and most influential studies of ancestor cults in East Asia, produced by native scholars (Hozumi 1913; Yanagita 1946; Hsu 1948), overemphasize the benign and protective qualities of ancestors. Some regional variations notwithstanding, this earlier bias appears to reflect a general East Asian reluctance to acknowledge instances of ancestral affliction. Such reticence is not found in all societies with ancestor cults, however; nor, in Korea, China, and Japan, is it equally prevalent among men and women. Therefore, we seek not only to identify the social experiences that give rise to beliefs in ancestral hostility, but to explain the concomitant reluctance to acknowledge these beliefs and its varying intensity throughout East Asia. In view of the limited amount of ethnographic data available from Korea, we have not attempted a comprehensive assessment of the ancestor cult in Korean society; instead we have kept our focus on a single kin group. We have drawn on data from other communities, however, in order to separate what is apparently true of Korea in general from what may be peculiar to communities like Twisongdwi, a village of about three hundred persons that was the site of our fieldwork. In this task, we benefited substantially from three excellent studies of Korean ancestor worship and lineage organization (Lee Kwang-Kyu 1977a; Choi Jai-seuk 1966a; Kim Taik-Kyoo 1964) and from two recent accounts of Korean folk religion and ideology (Dix 1977; Kendall 1979). Yet we are still a long way from a comprehensive understanding of how Korean beliefs and practices have changed over time, correlate with different levels of class status, or are affected by regional variations in Korean culture and social organization. Because we want to provide a monograph accessible to a rather diverse readership, we avoid using Korean words and disciplinary terminology whenever possible. Where a Korean term is particularly important, we give it in parentheses immediately after its English translation. Korean-alphabet orthographies for these words appear in the Character List, with Chinese-character equivalents for terms of Chinese derivation. As for disciplinary terminology, we have adopted only the anthropological term lineage, which is of central importance to our study. We use lineage to denote an organized group o This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Hardcover. Seller Inventory # 9780804711357

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KWANG-KYU Lee (& LINSKEY Joseph P., ed.)

Published by Seoul, Jimoondang 2003 (2003)

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About this Item: Seoul, Jimoondang 2003, 2003. viii + 369pp., 23cm., editor's hardcover, dustwrapper, in the series "Korean Studies Series" volume 25, very good condition, X79407. Seller Inventory # X79407

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Lee, Byung Kyu

Published by Seoul, Korea, 1986, First Edition, Christian Vision House (1986)

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About this Item: Seoul, Korea, 1986, First Edition, Christian Vision House, 1986. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. 1st Edition. Very Good Hardcover; in protective clear plastic cover; green cloth with red title block with some bright, distinct gilt edging and bright, distinct gilt lettering on front cover; red title/author block on spine with bright, distinct gilt lettering; slightly over 9" tall (8vo, Octavo); text in English; some slant to boards; 260 pages; some mild page edge stains; green end pages with textured design; some air bubbles, which originated with publisher, under pastedown end pages; small church price sticker on a blank page at end of text; 22 Chapters; Author: Rev. Byung Kyu Lee, D.D., founding pastor of the Myung-Ryeon Church, pastor of the Chang-Kwang Presbyterian Church in Seoul, and president of Covenant Theological Seminary in Seoul; a securely bound book. Seller Inventory # 22195

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