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    Hardcover. Condition: As New. Dust Jacket Condition: As New. 1st Edition.

  • Rasmussen, Daniel

    Published by Harper, 2011

    ISBN 10: 0061995215ISBN 13: 9780061995217

    Seller: Wonder Book, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.

    Association Member: ABAA ILAB

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    Book First Edition Signed

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    Condition: Very Good. Signed Copy First edition copy. . Very Good dust jacket. Signed by author on title page.

  • Rasmussen, Daniel

    Published by Harper [an Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers], New York, 2011

    ISBN 10: 0061995215ISBN 13: 9780061995217

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.

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    Hardcover. Condition: Very good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very good. Philip Hodges (Author photograph) (illustrator). viii, [2], 276 pages. Map. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Inscribed by author on the title page. Inscription reads To Michael, With best wishes, Dan Rasmussen. DJ has minor wear and soiling. Historian Daniel Rasmussen reveals the long-forgotten history of America's largest slave uprising, the New Orleans slave revolt of 1811. In an epic, illuminating narrative, Rasmussen offers new insight into American expansionism, the path to Civil War, and the earliest grassroots push to overcome slavery. Daniel Rasmussen graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard University in 2009. At Harvard, Rasmussen focused on studying slavery and the American South. He won the History and Literature sophomore essay prize for his essay on American expansion in Florida. His junior year, he began work on the 1811 German Coast Uprising-the largest slave revolt in American history. Rasmussen performed research in New Orleans, Washington, DC, and Massachusetts, finding letters, narratives, records planter statements of accounts, and newspaper articles‚"anything that would provide insight into the revolt. In order to piece together this broad assortment of evidence, Rasmussen built two databases with information about each slave and their actions. He constructed a multi‚"layered history that brought the slave revolt to life. Rasmussen's thesis won the Kathryn Ann Huggins Prize, the Perry Miller Prize and the Thomas Temple Hoopes Prize. The thesis is the basis for Rasmussen's first book, American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt. Derived from a Publishers Weekly article: This study of a January 1811 slave uprising and march on New Orleans exhumes the deliberately obscured and "largest act of armed resistance against slavery in the history of the United States." Historian Rasmussen expands on scarce source material to provide a complex context for a revolt that dwarfed such better-known rebellions as Nat Turner's and Denmark Vesey's, a stealthily organized uprising of 500 armed slaves dressed in military uniforms marching on and trying to conquer New Orleans. The author ties together diverse political, economic, and cultural threads in describing the rise (and suppression) of the "ethnically diverse, politically astute, and highly organized" army, and investigates why this "story more Braveheart than Beloved" was consigned to historical footnote. It vividly evokes the atmosphere of New Orleans of the early 19th century and how a recalcitrant, French-rooted Louisiana and some Spanish possessions in the Deep South were incorporated into the expanding American nation. The 1811 German Coast uprising was a revolt of slaves in parts of the Territory of Orleans on January 8-10, 1811. The uprising occurred on the east bank of the Mississippi River in what is now St. John the Baptist, St. Charles and Jefferson Parishes, Louisiana. The slave insurgency was the largest in U.S. history, but the rebels killed only two white men. Confrontations with militia, combined with post-trial executions, resulted in the deaths of 95 slaves. Between 64 and 125 enslaved men marched from sugarcane plantations in and near present-day LaPlace on the German Coast toward the city of New Orleans. They collected more men along the way. Some accounts claimed a total of 200 to 500 enslaved persons participated. During their two-day, twenty-mile march, the men burned five plantation houses (three completely), several sugarhouses, and crops. They were armed mostly with hand tools. Men led by officials of the territory formed militia companies, and in a battle on January 10 killed 40 to 45 of the people escaping slavery while suffering no fatalities themselves, then hunted down and killed several other people without trial. Over the next two weeks, white planters and officials interrogated, tried, executed, and decapitated an additional 44 people escaping slavery who had been captured. Executions were generally by hanging or firing squad. Heads were displayed on pikes to intimidate others. First Edition [Stated], First Printing [Stated].