Results (1 - 20) of 20

Show results for

Product Type

  • All Product Types
  • Books (20)
  • Magazines & Periodicals
  • Comics
  • Sheet Music
  • Art, Prints & Posters
  • Photographs
  • Maps
  • Manuscripts &
    Paper Collectibles

Refine by

Condition

Binding

Collectible Attributes

Free Shipping

Seller Location

Seller Rating

Lavoisier, A. L. , Faraday, M.

Published by Encyclopedia Britannica (1993)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Seneca Valley Books & Paper Collectibles (WATKINS GLEN, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 22.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Encyclopedia Britannica, 1993. Hardcover; 4th Printing. Condition: F+. Dust Jacket Condition: No Dust Jacket. 1st Edition Thus. Fine plus condition with almost no usage showing. Black covers. Spine has gold lettering. Endpapers show a chronology of the great authors. Free gift wrapping, card and drop shipping. Let us know the occasion and message. ; Great Books of the Western World; Vol. 42; Large 8vo; 806 pages. Seller Inventory # 23232

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 1.

Lavoisier, Antoine-Laurent; Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier; Michael Faraday.

Published by The Franklin Library, Franklin Center, PA (1985)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Reader's Corner, Inc. (Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 40.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 3.50
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: The Franklin Library, Franklin Center, PA, 1985. Leather Hard Bound. Condition: As New. No Jacket. First Edition. Gewwn leather with gold stamping, 3 rib spine, AEG, silk ribbon bookmarker, silk moire endpapers. A mint condition copy, looks like it has never been opened. A limited first edition privately printed exclusively for Members of the First Edition Society. MEDIA SHIPPING ONLY. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Limited Edition. Seller Inventory # 088452

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 2.

Faraday, Michael

Published by Dover Publications, New York (1965)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Bibliodisia Books (Chicago, IL, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 80.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 4.80
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Dover Publications, New York, 1965. Hardcover. Condition: Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: Near Fine. Line Illustrations (illustrator). First American Edition. Pioneering and celebrated work on electricity, a must in any science collection. A clean, tight, unmarked copy with two nics to the top inside corner of the dust jacket protected by a Brodart cover. Size: Octavo. Seller Inventory # 1358463

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 3.

Faraday, Michael

Published by Dover Publications (1963)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Columbia Books, ABAA/ILAB (Columbia, MO, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 85.00
Convert currency
Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Dover Publications, 1963. Hardcover. Condition: Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: Fine. 1st Edition. Faraday, Michael. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES IN ELECTRICITY. VOLUME III. NY: Dover Publications, c1965. 588pp., index, 2 plates on a folded sheet of paper in a homemade paper pocket inside rear cover. Fine hardcover in fine d/j. Seller Inventory # 43349

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 4.

FARADAY, Michael.

Published by Dover Publications,, NY: (1965)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Grendel Books, ABAA/ILAB (West Chesterfield, MA, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 85.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 5.00
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Dover Publications,, NY:, 1965. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. Volume III only. First edition thus. Very good in a very good (age toning) dust jacket. ; 588 pages. Seller Inventory # 64878

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 5.

Elements of Chemistry Analytical Theory of Heat: Antoine - Laurent

Antoine - Laurent Lavoisier, Jean - Baptiste - Joseph, Michael Faraday

Published by The Franklin Library

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: ThriftBooks - Second City (Aurora, IL, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 203.99
Convert currency
Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: The Franklin Library. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Limited edition, first printing. Minor shelf and handling wear, overall a clean solid copy with minimal signs of use. Limited Edition, Accented in 22kt gold, Bound In full leather with hubbed spines moire endpaper, some sligth age-toning to edges of endpages. Satin ribbon sewn-in. A handsome volume. Secure packaging for safe delivery. Seller Inventory # 1016998516

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 6.

Lavoisier Fourier Faraday

Published by Franklin Library, Franklin Center Pennsylvania (1985)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Rare Book Cellar (Pomona, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 299.95
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 5.95
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Franklin Library, Franklin Center Pennsylvania, 1985. Hardcover. First Edition; First Printing. Near Fine, Leather Bound, Accented in 22kt gold. Printed on archival paper with gilded edges. The endsheets are of moire fabric with a silk ribbon page marker. Smyth sewing and concealed muslin joints. This book is in full leather with hubbed spines.; Franklin Library the Great Books of the Western World Series; 8vo 8" - 9" tall. Seller Inventory # 85579

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 7.

Antoine - Laurent Lavoisier, Jean - Baptiste - Joseph, Michael Faraday

Published by The Franklin Library, Franklin Center Pennsylvania (1985)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Rare Book Cellar (Pomona, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 299.95
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 5.95
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: The Franklin Library, Franklin Center Pennsylvania, 1985. Hardcover. First Edition; First Printing. Fine, Accented in 22kt gold, printed on archival paper with gilded edges, smyth sewing & concealed muslin joints. Bound In full leather with hubbed spines. A Limited Edition. Franklin Library the Great Books of the Western World Series. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall. Seller Inventory # 110220

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 8.

FARADAY, Michael; D.C.L., F.R.S. (FullerianProfessor of Chemistry in the Royal Institution, . . .):

Published by London, Bernard Quaritch, 1839. (1839)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: CO-LIBRI ~ Bremen / Berlin (Bremen, Germany)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 302.73
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 18.85
From Germany to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: London, Bernard Quaritch, 1839., 1839. viii, 574 pages on untrimmed paper; 8 folded engraved plates. - Publisher's gilt-titled gently blind-tooled green cloth-binding; lex.-8vo.(ca. 22 x 16 x 5 cm; ca. 1,2 kg.). *** [AUSKLINGENDER SOMMERFERIEN-VERKAUF / Fading Summer-Holidays Sale: immer noch um über 40% REDUZIERTER PREIS bis Donnerstag 22.08.2019, 24 Uhr MESZ/CEST; vorher/previously: EUR 465,-] --- FIRST EDITION, CLOTHBOUND ORIGINAL; WITH THE SCIENTIST'S PREFACE TO THIS COLLECTION, dated 1839. - Top of spine and sharp-corners slightly rubbed, hinges as well, froont-hinge slightly stronger; else in best condition. --- ALSO IN STOCK, Volume III (1855) in a matching binding. . . Seller Inventory # 1806280676xag

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 9.

FARADAY, Michael; D.C.L., F.R.S. (FullerianProfessor of Chemistry in the Royal Institution, . . .):

Published by London, Bernard Quaritch, 1855. (1855)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: CO-LIBRI ~ Bremen / Berlin (Bremen, Germany)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 302.73
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 18.85
From Germany to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: London, Bernard Quaritch, 1855., 1855. viii, 588 pages on untrimmed paper; 4 (3 multiple folded) engraved plates. - Publisher's gilt-titled gently blind-tooled green cloth-binding; lex.-8vo.(ca. 22 x 16 x 5 cm; ca. 1,2 kg.). *** [AUSKLINGENDER SOMMERFERIEN-VERKAUF / Fading Summer-Holidays Sale: immer noch um über 40% REDUZIERTER PREIS bis Donnerstag 22.08.2019, 24 Uhr MESZ/CEST; vorher/previously: EUR 465,-] --- FIRST EDITION, CLOTHBOUND ORIGINAL; WITH THE SCIENTIST'S PREFACE TO THIS COLLECTION, dated 1855. - Corners minimally rubbed, inner hinges professionally reinforced preserving the original material; else in best condition. --- ALSO IN STOCK, Volume III (1855) in a matching binding. . . Seller Inventory # 1806280677xag

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 10.

Experimental Researches in Electricity -- Thirtieth Series',: FARADAY, Michael

FARADAY, Michael

Published by Richard Taylor and William Francis [for the Royal Society], London (1856)

Used
First Edition
Softcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Type & Forme ABA, PBFA, ILAB (Grantham, LINCS, United Kingdom)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 312.37
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 30.33
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Richard Taylor and William Francis [for the Royal Society], London, 1856. Original wrappers. Condition: Very Good. 1st Edition. Quarto (297 x 228mm), pp. x (title, blank, advertisement, list of recipients of copies and subscribers, blank, contents), 418, [2 (blank l.)]. 8 lithographic plates and maps, 5 engraved plates and maps, and 2 engraved graphs, one folding. Letterpress tables (some full-page) and wood-engraved illustrations and diagrams in the text. (Very occasional light spotting, heavier on a few plates, short marginal tear on title due to clumsy opening, pl. IX with short tear, pl. XIII detached but present.) Original grey printed wrappers, entirely uncut and (apart from a few quires) entirely unopened. (Wrappers lightly browned and marked, extremities slightly bumped, short tear on upper wrapper, spine-ends with short splits causing small losses at foot.) A very good, fresh copy in the original wrappers. Provenance: [?]early-20th-century manuscript volume number on spine. ¶¶¶First edition. Faraday (1791-1867), was employed as a fourteen-year-old apprentice bookbinder by the bookseller George Ribeau, and he first encountered science when one of Ribeau's customers gave him tickets to attend four of the final lectures delivered by Humphry Davy, the professor of chemistry at the Royal Institution, in 1812. Faraday's scientific career began as an assistant at the laboratory of the Royal Institution, of which he would become the director in 1825. By the time of the publication of this paper he had achieved international renown, which was reflected in numerous awards and honours, including fellowship of the Royal Society, membership of the Prussian order of merit and the French Légion d'honneur, etc. Published in 1856, and thus during a period of exceptional activity and innovation within the circles of the Royal Society, this issue of the Philosophical Transactions concludes Faraday's ground-breaking series of ?Experimental Researches in Electricity? -- the papers relating his major discoveries in electricity and magnetism. 'With this work Faraday [. . .] perfected his methodical way of recording and keeping control of his experimental results. On 25 August 1832 he commenced numbering the paragraphs of his laboratory notebook in a sequence that would conclude on 6 March 1860 with paragraph 16,041. He would cross-refer between entries and on at least two occasions he compiled indexes allowing him quickly to locate the results of experiments conducted many years previously. Faraday published his induction work in the first of a series of papers with the overarching title Experimental Researches in Electricity. The papers were nearly all published in the Philosophical Transactions and their paragraphs also were sequentially numbered ending with paragraph 3430 of series thirty in 1856' (ODNB). Most of these papers were then collected in Faraday's Experimental Researches in Electricity, which was published in three volumes between 1839 and 1855 (concluding with paragraph 3234), and 'encompasses the entire range of Faraday's remarkable achievement, including his discovery of electromagnetic induction, his demonstration of the identity of all forms of electricity, his first general theory of electricity as a function of interparticulate strain, and the last series of researches on magnetism, containing the germ of modern field theory, in which Faraday rejected his earlier model of the transmission of magnetic energy in favour of one locating the manifestation of magnetic energy in the field surrounding the magnet' (Norman 762). This 'Thirtieth Series', which was read to the Royal Society on 15 and 22 November 1855, comprised paragraphs 3363 to 3430 and was first published in this volume of Philosophical Transactions in 1856, the year after the publication of final volume of Experimental Researches in Electricity, and thus it forms both a supplement and a conclusion to the series. ¶¶¶SHIPPING: this is a heavy volume, so please confirm shipping cost with us before ordering. Seller Inventory # 002054

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 11.

Faraday, Brewster, Taylor, Phillips and Others

Published by Richard Taylor, London (1835)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Leigh Gallery Books (LEIGH ON SEA, ESSEX, United Kingdom)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 374.84
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 5.40
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Richard Taylor, London, 1835. Half-Leather. Condition: Good+. First Edition. 472pp including index. This is volume 6 of the London and Edinburgh Philosophical Magazine January - June 1835. The Faraday item appears in each of the six issues and is complete.approx 60 pages. together with the engraving. [Two plates are called for and are present]. Many other important contributions but the Faraday is the most significant. Slight foxing, marbled boards and leather rubbed but binding sound. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Seller Inventory # 45595

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 12.

About this Item: The Royal Society, London, 1840. 1st Edition. BOUND 1st EDITION, PARTS I & II TOGETHER HOUSING FIRST EDITIONS OF MANY IMPORTANT PAPERS IN A WIDE VARIETY OF FIELDS: THE SCIENCE OF PHOTOGRAPHY, ELECTRICITY, PHYSIOLOGY, & ASTRONOMY. Fine condition; 30 plates. HERSCHEL'S: Herschel's seminal paper is by far his most elaborate on the subject, introducing "the photographical concepts 'positive' and 'negative' to express. pictures in which the lights and shades are the same as in nature, or as in the original model, in which they are opposite. Also included is a densely packed detailed account of the use of hyposulfite of soda as a fixative, his observation of the superior light-sensitivity of bromide of silver, a description of his 1st experiments with photography in solar spectroscopy, and his process. for obtaining direct positive proofs on paper, the necessity of using achromatic lenses for correct delineation, etc." (ibid; Schaaf, Out of the Shadows, 94). Herschel's discussion of "the dynamical interplay between photochemistry and photography is of the greatest importance in applied photography. The later sections of the paper deal with the spectrum of the sun, [his] so-called thermographical representation of the spectrum of the sun (with description of the Actinograph, invented by him), rendering the heat radiation visible in the spectrum. reproduced here on one of the plates" (ibid). Herschel wrote: "The object which the author has in view in this memoir is to place on record a number of insulated facts and observations respecting the relations both of white light and of the differently refrangible rays to various chemical agents which have offered themselves to his notice in the course of his photographical experiments, suggested by the announcement of M. Daguerre's discovery.The terms "direct" and "reverse" are also used to express pictures in which objects appear, as regards right and left, the same as in the original, and the contrary.The principal objects of inquiry in the present paper.are the following. The means of fixing photographs, the comparative merits of different chemical agents.The means of taking photographic copies and transfers.The preparation of photographic paper.The chemical analysis of the solar spectrum forms the subjects of the next section in the paper."(Herschel 1840). FARADAY'S: "In 1931 in a series of never-to-be-forgotten experiments, Faraday in quick succession discovered the laws of induced currents, and in so doing laid that foundations for the unparalleled triumphs of modern electricity. He made the fundamental discovery that whenever lines of magnetic force are made to cut across a conductor. or a conductor is made to cut across lines of force, a current is induced in the conductor. In this basic principle lay the invention of the dynamo, the electric motor, the induction coil and transformer, the x-ray, and a host of revolutionizing application of this mysterious form of energy. Without this discovery, electricity would still be the plaything of science. Immediately following this, Faraday in a series of researches worked out the laws of electrochemical action and invented the first accurate electric measuring instrument" (Darrow, Masters of Science, pp. 76-77). BOWMAN'S: One of Bowman's two "classical descriptions[s] of the striated muscle," this being the 1st (G & M 542); we offer the 1841 2nd paper separately. PARSON'S: The Earl of Rosse gives a detailed account of the experiments which step by step led to his construction a reflecting telescope with a mirror 72 inches in diameter, then and for the next 70 years, the largest in the world. Parson's designed and made everything himself, even setting up a foundry to cast the mirror and inventing a huge machine to polish it. CONDITION: Complete. 30 plates. Faded stamp & blind stamp on title page; no other markings. Handsomely rebound in calf. 5 raised bands at the spine. Red & black gilt-lettered spine labels. Original wide margins. Bright & clean. Fine. Seller Inventory # 1258

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 13.

Experimental Researches in Electricity: Michael Faraday

Michael Faraday

Published by Bernard Quaritch (1839)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: South Willington Book Cartel (WILLINGTON, CT, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 1,275.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 4.00
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Bernard Quaritch, 1839. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. 1st Edition. Michael Faraday. Experimental Researches in Electricity London, Bernard Quaritch, 1839, 1844, 1855. First editions. Octavos 22 x 14 cm. II: I: 1839. Papers from 1831-1838. viii-574; 8 fold-out engraved diagrams. II: 1844. Papers from 1838-43. viii, 302; 5 diagrams, three of them folding III:1855. Papers from 1846-1852. viii.588 pages. 4 diagrams, three of them fold-out with light foxing on two of them, and heavy foxing on one. Uniformly bound in three-quarter leather, marbled edges, marbled end-papers, clear labels, slight wear at hinges, some foxing on end-papers. Volume II has surface peeled on part of upper right front board. Owner stamp on title pages. Over-all, at least very good condition, More photos available. Faraday s papers, reprinted from the Philosophical Transactions along with Electrical Papers from the Proceedings of the Royal Institution and Philosophical Magazine. Faraday is in the elite corps of scientists with a unit (in his case of capacitance) named after him. (Others include Watt, Volta, Ohm, Ampere, Bell, Coulomb, Henry, Newton, Joule, Tesla, Gauss, Hertz, Tesla, Weber, Mach). Important papers in the history of science. Seller Inventory # ABE-1555160903351

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 14.

FARADAY, Michael.

Published by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, London (1838)

Used
First Edition
Softcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Athena Rare Books ABAA (Fairfield, CT, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 1,500.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 10.00
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, London, 1838. FIRST EDITION. Part I. Richard and John Taylor, London, 1838. Eleventh Series, pp. 1-40, 79-81; Twelfth Series, pp. 83-123; Thirteenth Series, pp. 125-168. TP + [iii]-iv =Advertisements +[v]-[vi] =Distribution List + [xi] = Contents + [vii]-ix = Royal Medals + [xi]=Contents + [1]-168 + [169]-[172] = Meteorological Journal + Plate I + Plate II + Plate III, Quarto. First Edition. Michael Faraday "was both one of the greatest physicist of the nineteenth century and one of the greatest experimentalist of all time." Unusually, for people with great genius, he was a late developer and had a high level of creativity and productivity throughout his later life. His conceptual imagination became most powerfully creative after the age of forty-five -- the period when these papers where written. "Although his discovery of the electric motor and the dynamo was almost entirely incidental to his theoretical discoveries, it laid the foundation of the modern electrical industry." (PMM, 308)"Between 1832 and 1852 Faraday published twenty-nine series of papers in the Philosophical Transactions under the title "Experimental researches in electricity"; it was through these papers that his major discoveries relating to electricity and magnetism were first published . These papers, along with pertinent papers and letters published in other scientific journals, were collected in three volumes published in 1839, 1844 and 1855. The collection encompasses the entire range of Faraday's remarkable achievement, including his discovery of electromagnetic induction, his demonstration of the identity of all formes of electricity, his first general theory of electricity as a function of interparticulate strain, and the last series of researches on magnetism, containing the germ of modern field theory, in which Faraday rejected his earlier model of the transmission of magnetic energy in favor of one locating the manifestion of magnetic energy in the field surrounding the magnet." (Norman 762). " Eleventh Series: ".[Faraday] concluded that the behavior of a dielectric is exactly the same as that of an electrolyte, up to the point at which the electrolyte breaks down under the electric stress. The polarized condition acquired by a dielectric when placed in an electric field forcibly recalled to Faraday the condition of magnetic polarization, and that is precisely the reason why he introduced his lines of electric force, defined as curves whose tangents at every point have the same direction as the electric intensity. [in] 1838, Faraday applied Poisson's theory of induced magnetism to the case of induction in dielectrics, contending that the particles of an insulting dielectric, whilst under induction may be compared to . a series of small insulated conductors. In the field of a charged sphere these little conductors would all be polar; if the sphere were discharged they would all return to their normal state." (Taton, A General History of the Sciences, pp. 199-200)Faraday reflected on these observations, especially on the fact that contiguous particles were capable of transmitting step by step all those actions which appear to take place at a distance. Eventually, he reached the prescient view that the ultimate particles of matter might well be nothing other than the center of forces, forces being the constituent elements of matter. " Twelfth and Thirteenth Series: Faraday devoted these two series to electric discharges in the "vacuum" and these extended studies of the conductivity of gases sparked off a revolution in physics. He noticed that the negative pole became covered with a continuous glow and that it was separated from the positive pole by what has become known as "Faraday's Dark Space". Though Faraday had to leave it at that, because the air pumps then in use were incapable of evacuating vessels to the required extent, he predicted that the results connected with the different conditions of positive and negative discharge would have great influence on the "philosophy. Seller Inventory # 992

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 15.

Experimental researches in electricity - twenty-eight series.: FARADAY, Michael

About this Item: Richard Taylor and William Francis, London, 1852. Hardcover. First edition. First edition, journal issue, of these two papers containing Faraday's detailed investigations of the nature of the 'lines of force' he had proposed in his first paper on electromagnetism, 'On some new electro-magnetical motions, and on the theory of magnetism', originally published in the 21 October 1821 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Science. These investigations laid the foundations of field theory. "Faraday's work on electromagnetic rotations led him to take a view of electromagnetism different from that of most of his contemporaries. Where they focused on the electrical fluids and the peculiar forces engendered by their motion (Ampère's position), he was forced to consider the line of force. He did not know what it was in 1821, but he suspected that it was a state of strain in the molecules of the current carrying wire and the surrounding medium produced by the passage of an electrical "current" (whatever that was) through the wire . It was the line of force which tied all his researches on electricity and magnetism together" (DSB). This volume contains the 28th and 29th series of the 30 series of Faraday's Experimental Researches in Electricity, comprising sections 3070-3176 and 3177-3242, respectively. "It was not until July of 1851 that Faraday was able to turn his attention fully to the investigation of the intimate nature of lines of force. In part this was due simply to the press of business and the fact that as he grew older he could no longer work as he had done in the 1850s. His mind, although still able to rise to great peaks of originality was, nevertheless, failing. His memory was increasingly bad and he found it ever more difficult to keep the object of his researches before him . The character of his thought also changed at about this time. Before 1850 he had rather carefully hidden his theoretical ideas from the scientific world, using them to guide him from discovery to discovery. By 1850 the long string of discoveries that were to guarantee him immortality in the history of science had come to an end. Never again was he to startle the learned world with some new effect which few, if any, of his colleagues had suspected but which he had deduced from his own hypotheses. The decade of the 1850s, rather, was to be spent in the exposition and defence of his theories. He was not, of course, prepared to abandon experiment but his experiments were now overtly the ammunition with which he supported theoretical positions taken up publicly and in print. His purpose was nothing less than to supply a general view of the modes of action of force. Central to this view was the physical reality of the lines of force. "The basic question to which Faraday turned in the summer of 1851 concerned the interpretation of the pattern made by iron filings sprinkled on a card over a magnet. The filings arranged themselves in lines; were these lines 'real' or were they merely the result of the interaction of the magnet and the iron filings? Faraday had long viewed them as strains of some sort but it was now time to discover their true nature. If strains, to what were they connected so that the strain could be imposed along the line of force? The electrostatic line of force was firmly anchored in electrically excited matter and the strain, transmitted along the curves of the intervening polarized particles, ended in positively and negatively charged surfaces. An electrostatic line of force could start in a charged sphere and leap across a room to the wall. If the sphere were positively charged, the part of the wall where the line of force ended would be negative. The line, and the particles in between were all polar having 'positive' and 'negative' ends. Magnetic lines were peculiar in that they always returned to the body from which they emanated. It was impossible to hold up a sphere 'charged' with north magnetism and trace a line of magnetic force across a room to a south pole on the wall. Wherever a north pole existed, a south was also to be found, nearby, in the same body. The ends of the line of force, then, had to be the poles of the magnet. This was where the strain originated; here must be where the original tension was applied. "When examined critically this explanation made little sense. An iron magnet was, after all, relatively homogeneous. Why, then, should two particular spots, indistinguishable from other places, become poles? Why, to put it another way, should the lines of force terminate at all? From 1845 to 1850 Faraday had gradually convinced himself that the actual particles of magnetic or diamagnetic substances counted for very little in magnetic phenomena. Why, then, call in particles merely to have an anchor for the lines of force? Could not poles be dispensed with altogether? "The first thing that had to be done was to make certain that the lines of force really existed independently of the iron filings that illustrated their forms so beautifully. Since iron itself was magnetic, it was possible that the magnetic curves might be the result of placing iron filings over a magnet and that when the filings were not present, the curves vanished. The use of a compass needle was open to the same objections. If the lines of force were created by the interaction of the needle and the magnet, the needle would still trace them out as if the lines existed independently of the needle. One method alone appeared free from fault. A conducting wire in the presence of a magnet showed no effect; when the wire was moved across the lines of force, a current was generated. The moving wire involved no attraction, repulsion, or other polar effects. The lines of force detected by this method would, therefore, not appear to be created by the presence of the wire. 'So,' Faraday concluded, 'a moving wire may be accepted as a correct philosophical indication of the presence of magnetic force' (3083). "The existence of the lines of force gave no hints about their essential properties. Were they cont. Seller Inventory # 4416

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 16.

Experimental researches in electricity - twenty-eight series.: FARADAY, MICHAEL

About this Item: Taylor and Francis, London, 1852. Original Wrappers. Condition: Very Good. First edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS of two papers containing Faraday's detailed investigations of the nature of the 'lines of force'; an extension of work he had begun in his first paper (1821) on electromagnetism. These investigations laid the foundations of field theory. "Faraday's work on electromagnetic rotations led him to take a view of electromagnetism different from that of most of his contemporaries. Where they focused on the electrical fluids and the peculiar forces engendered by their motion (Ampère's position), he was forced to consider the line of force. He did not know what it was in 1821, but he suspected that it was a state of strain in the molecules of the current carrying wire and the surrounding medium produced by the passage of an electrical 'current' (whatever that was) through the wire ? It was the line of force which tied all his researches on electricity and magnetism together" (DSB). "It was not until July of 1851 that Faraday was able to turn his attention fully to the investigation of the intimate nature of lines of force. His purpose was nothing less than to supply a general view of the modes of action of force. Central to this view was the physical reality of the lines of force. "The basic question to which Faraday turned in the summer of 1851 concerned the interpretation of the pattern made by iron filings sprinkled on a card over a magnet. The filings arranged themselves in lines; were these lines 'real' or were they merely the result of the interaction of the magnet and the iron filings? Faraday had long viewed them as strains of some sort but it was now time to discover their true nature. If strains, to what were they connected so that the strain could be imposed along the line of force? The electrostatic line of force was firmly anchored in electrically excited matter and the strain, transmitted along the curves of the intervening polarized particles, ended in positively and negatively charged surfaces. An electrostatic line of force could start in a charged sphere and leap across a room to the wall. If the sphere were positively charged, the part of the wall where the line of force ended would be negative. The line, and the particles in between were all polar having 'positive' and 'negative' ends. Magnetic lines were peculiar in that they always returned to the body from which they emanated. It was impossible to hold up a sphere 'charged' with north magnetism and trace a line of magnetic force across a room to a south pole on the wall. Wherever a north pole existed, a south was also to be found, nearby, in the same body. The ends of the line of force, then, had to be the poles of the magnet. This was where the strain originated; here must be where the original tension was applied. "When examined critically this explanation made little sense. An iron magnet was, after all, relatively homogeneous. Why, then, should two particular spots, indistinguishable from other places, become poles? Why, to put it another way, should the lines of force terminate at all? From 1845 to 1850 Faraday had gradually convinced himself that the actual particles of magnetic or diamagnetic substances counted for very little in magnetic phenomena. Why, then, call in particles merely to have an anchor for the lines of force? Could not poles be dispensed with altogether? "The first thing that had to be done was to make certain that the lines of force really existed independently of the iron filings that illustrated their forms so beautifully. Since iron itself was magnetic, it was possible that the magnetic curves might be the result of placing iron filings over a magnet and that when the filings were not present, the curves vanished. The use of a compass needle was open to the same objections. If the lines of force were created by the interaction of the needle and the magnet, the needle would still trace them out as if the lines existed independently of the needle. One method alone appeared free from fault. A conducting. Seller Inventory # 2031

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 17.

Experimental Researches in Electricity: FARADAY, MICHAEL

FARADAY, MICHAEL

Published by Richard and John Edward Taylor, London (1839)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

Add to Basket
US$ 7,800.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 6.00
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Richard and John Edward Taylor, London, 1839. Original cloth. Condition: Very Good. First edition. FIRST EDITIONS IN ORIGINAL CLOTH OF ALL THREE VOLUMES OF FARADAY'S MONUMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES IN ELECTRICITY, THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE RECORD OF HIS ACHIEVEMENTS. PMM 308. "Faraday was both one of the greatest physicists of the nineteenth century and one of the finest experimenters of all time. He was the first to produce an electric current from a magnetic field, invented the first electric motor and dynamo, demonstrated the relation between electricity and chemical bonding, discovered the effect of magnetism on light, and discovered and named diamagnetism, the peculiar behaviour of certain substances in strong magnetic fields. He provided the experimental, and a good deal of the theoretical, foundation upon which James Clerk Maxwell erected classical electromagnetic field theory" (Printing and the Mind of Man 308; Britannica). Faraday published the results of his experiments and discoveries in journals and it was not until he collected them in these volumes that his work became more widely and permanently available. Since the volumes were issued separately over a period of sixteen years, it is very rare to find a set of the three first editions together. Experimental Researches in Electricity. Reprinted from the Philosophical Transactions. London: Richard and John Edward Taylor, 1839, 1844, 1855. Octavo, original green cloth. Three volumes. Ex-libris Bath Public Library with call numbers on spine, bookplate on front pastedowns, and occasional small embossed stamp to text and all plates. Ownership signature of Alfred Jones on each title. Text clean, some spotting to cloth and one repaired spine tear, on hinge split but holding. RARE. Seller Inventory # 2266

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 18.

Experimental Researches in Electricity. (Twenty-second Series). [Offprint: FARADAY, MICHAEL. -

FARADAY, MICHAEL. - [INSCRIBED BY FARADAY TO LORD KELVIN]

Used
First Edition
Softcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: Lynge & Søn ILAB-ABF (Copenhagen, Denmark)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

Add to Basket
US$ 11,032.35
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 46.58
From Denmark to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: London: Richard and John E. Taylor, 1849. Large 4to. (300x231mm). Original blank wrappers. Some small tears. Back strip proffesionally repaired with Japanese paper. With presentation by Faraday in ink on title page: "William Thomson Esq. | St. Peters College | from the Author." (2),41,(1:blank). First edition, rare offprint issue of "one of the great classics of chemistry and physics" with the extremely attractive presentation inscription from Faraday to William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin), who delivered the first mathematical exposition of Faraday's researches in electricity. Thomson provided an important theoretical direction for Faraday's interpretation of his own experiments and the two colleagues motivated and inspired each other to a degree that the research and knowledge of electricity they possessed and published would not have would have been reached until many years later. The paper itself is of the utmost importance since much of his groundbreaking research published in 1831-1839 contained many shortcomings and errors which in this publication are corrected. "The corrected second edition of volume 1 is preferred, because the first edition (London 1839) contained many errors". (Neville, Historical Chemical Library)."In June 1849 William Thomson wrote to Michael Faraday suggesting that the concept of a uniform magnetic field could be used to predict the motions of small magnetic and diamagnetic bodies. [.] There had been an important exchange of ideas between the two, who had a common interest in explaining voltaic, electrostatic, magnetic, optical, and thermal phenomena. They meet every year between 1845 (where they became acquainted) and 1849". (Gooding, Faraday, Thomson, and the Concept of the Magnetic Field).In 1845 Thomson gave the first mathematical development of Faraday's idea that electric induction takes place through an intervening medium, or "dielectric", and not by some imprecise "action at a distance". He also devised a hypothesis of electrical images, which became a powerful agent in solving problems of electrostatics, or the science which deals with the forces of electricity at rest. It was partly in response to his encouragement that Faraday undertook the research in September 1845 that led to the discovery of the Faraday Effect, which established that light and magnetic (and thereby electric) phenomena were related.Faraday was also the direct cause of William Thomson's work on the transatlantic submarine telegraph cable. Faraday had in 1854 demonstrated how the construction of a cable would limit the rate at which messages could be sent, what later would be termed the bandwidth. Thomson immediately looked into the problem and published his response the same month Faraday had published his observations. Thomson expressed his results in terms of the data rate that could be achieved and the economic consequences in terms of the potential revenue of the transatlantic undertaking. In 1855 Thomson stressed the impact that the design of the cable would have on its profitability. Thomson's work on the cable consequently resulted in a complete system for operating a submarine telegraph that was capable of sending a character every 3.5 seconds. He patented the key elements of his system, the mirror galvanometer and the siphon recorder, in 1858.From 1831 to 1852 Michael Faraday published his "Experimental Researches in Electricity" in The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. These papers contain not only an impressive series of experimental discoveries, but also a collection of heterodox theoretical concepts on the nature of these phenomena expressed in terms of lines of forces and fields. He published 30 papers in all under this general title. They represents Faraday's most important work, are classics in both chemistry and physics and are the experimental foundations for Maxwell's electro-magnetic theory of light, using Faraday's concepts of lines of force or tubes of magnetic and electrical forces. His many experiments on the effects of electricity and magnetism presented in these papers lead to the fundamental discoveries of 'induced electricity' (the Faraday current), the electronic state of matter, the identity of electricity from different sources, equivalents in electro-chemical decomposition, electrostatic induction, hydro-electricity, diamagnetism, relation of gravity to electricity, atmospheric magnetism and many other."Among experimental philosophers Faraday holds by universal consent the foremost place. The memoirs in which his discoveries are enshrined will never cease to be read with admiration and delight; and future generation will preserve with an affection not less enduring the personal records and familiar letters, which recall the memory of his humble and unselfish spirit."Whittaker, A History of the Theories of Aether & Electricity, 197 p.). Seller Inventory # 38043

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 19.

Experimental Researches in Electricity: FARADAY, MICHAEL

FARADAY, MICHAEL

Published by Richard Taylor, London (1832)

Used
First Edition
Softcover

Quantity Available: 1

Add to Basket
US$ 12,000.00
Convert currency
Shipping: US$ 6.00
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

About this Item: Richard Taylor, London, 1832. Original Wrappers. First edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF MICHAEL FARADAY'S MOST FAMOUS AND INFLUENTIAL PAPER, REPORTING THE FIRST PRODUCTION OF ELECTRICITY BY ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION. "Oersted had shown (1820) that an electric current generated magnetism; Faraday, among many, tried for 10 years to generate electricity from magnetism. Towards the end of 1831 a new approach occurred to him and in 10 intensive days he concentrated on successfully accomplishing this and proving that the electricity so generated met all the criteria of real electricity. This he did in a paper read before the Royal Society on November 24, 1831. Electric generation based on electro-magnetic induction was thus discovered and remains the means of generating nearly all the electricity in use today" (Dibner 64). Faraday's paper on electromagnetic induction was the first in his "Experimental Researches in Electricity" series--a series he would continue throughout his career. In the "Second Series," also included in this collection, Faraday describes (in the prestigious Bakerian Lecture) his famous experiment where, by rotating a copper disc attached with wires between the poles of a horseshoe magnet, he created the first successful production of a continuous and steady direct electric current. This was the first electric generator. (see Printing and the Mind of Man [PMM] 308); Dibner 64. Experimental Researches in Electricity. Read November 24, 1831, pp. 125-162. WITH: The Bakerian Lecture: Experimental Researches in Electricity, Second Series. Read January 12, 1832, pp. 163-194. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the year MDCCCXXXII, Part I. London: Richard Taylor, 1832. Quarto, original wrappers; custom half-leather box. "1832" and "I" written in early ink on spine. Wrappers with chipping and splitting to spine ends. Some dampstaining to the plates (including the two Faraday plates) bound at rear. Text pristine. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE SURVIVAL IN UNRESTORED ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF ONE OF THE LANDMARK PAPERS IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE. Seller Inventory # 2224

More information about this seller | Contact this seller 20.

Results (1 - 20) of 20