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Die Ritterlich und lobwürdig reiß [.] Sagend: Varthema, Lodovico di.
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About this Item: Strasbourg, Johann Knobloch, 1516., 1516. 4to. 226 pp. (A8, B-C4, D8, E-F4, G8, H-J4, K8, L-M4, N8, O-P4, Q8, R-S4, T6, V4, X7, without the final blank). With title woodcut and 47 woodcuts in the text (including 1 full-page illustration). - (Bound after) II: Giovio, Paolo. Libellus de legatione Basilii Magni principis Moschoviae ad Clementem VII. Pontificem Max. in qua situs regionis antiquis incognitus, religio gentis, mores, & causae legationis fidelissime referuntur. Basel, [J. Froben], 1527. 39, (1) pp. With woodcut printer's device to t. p. - (Bound after) III: Fabri (of Leutkirch), Johann. Ad serenissimum principem Ferdinandum Archiducem Austriae, Moscovitarum iuxta mare glaciale religio. Basel, J. Bebel, 1526. 18 ff. - (Bound after) IV: Ricoldo (da Monte di Croce). Contra sectam Mahumeticam libellus. (Georgius de Hungaria). De vita & moribus Turcorum. Carben, Victor de. Libellus de vita et moribus Iudaeorum (ed. J. Lefèvre). Paris, H. Estienne, 1511. 86 ff. With large woodcut in the text and several woodcut initials. - (Bound after) V: Ficinus, Marsilio. De religione Christiana & fidei pietate opusculum. Xenocrates de morte, eodem interprete. Strasbourg, J. Knobloch, 1507. 90 ff. With woodcut printer's device on final page. - (Bound after) VI: Haythonus (Hatto). Liber historiarum partium orientis, sive passagium terrae sanctae scriptus anno Redemptoris nostri M.CCC. Hagenau, J. Setzer, 1529. 71 ff. With woodcut title border and device on final page. Contemp. wooden boards with wide blindstamped leather spine and 2 brass clasps. The first illustrated edition (in its second issue) of one of the most famous early travel reports and the first western encounter with the Arab world. Of the utmost rarity; not a single copy could be traced on the market for the past sixty years; not a single copy in the USA (cf. OCLC). Lodovico de Varthema’s "Itinerario" describes the first recorded eyewitness account by a westerner of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). This - the first illustrated one - is certainly the rarest of them all: international auction records list not a single copy. The 1510 editio princeps was offered for US$ 1 million at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair in April 2011. - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [.] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural infor. Seller Inventory # 33502

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YOUNGSON, Thomas (1784-1839) and others.

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From: Arader Galleries - Aradernyc (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: 0. Hardcover. Condition: Fine. Oblong folio (11 1/8 x 17 1/8 inches). 163 fine mounted original watercolor drawings, 7 mounted unfinished drawings, 2 watercolor drawings, 2 pencil drawings, and 2 copies of a lithograph loosely inserted (album leaves a bit frayed at the edges, not affecting the images. Original half green morocco gilt (worn). Provenance: Bookplate of H. Bradley Martin, collection of Magnificent Ornithology on the front paste-down. A fine collection of Indian ornithological watercolor drawings depicting a wide variety of birds: orioles, shrikes, King Fishers, hawks etc., interleaved with extensive manuscript notes detailing the physical description of the bird, its habitat, behavioral anecdotes and where the particular specimen was found (Bellary, Madras, Malabar, Piddapalliam). Youngson often includes a comparison with European birds. Although Youngson painted many of the images there are a number of distinctive images by extremely talented Indian artists interspersed throughout. Youngson was born in Aberdeenshire, the son of a clergyman. In 1803 he joined the Madras Infantry and was stationed first at Bellery and then at Jalna in Hyderabad. Purchased at Sotheby's 7th June 1989, lot 242. Catalogue description prepared for and on behalf of Arader Galleries by Kate Hunter. Book. Seller Inventory # 001613

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About this Item: 1765. THE MOST ACCURATE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MAP OF INDIA Watercolor and ink on paper: 42" x 66" c. 1765-1770 Provenance: French Dépôt des Cartes et Plans de la Marine. The mid-to-late 1700s witnessed a number of conflicts between the British and French over colonial holdings, and not just in North America. India, too, was a source of contention, as witnessed by this magnificent, large-scale manuscript map of present-day northeast India. This unique monument marks the end of French colonial aspirations in the region, and represents the most accurate manuscript map of India from the eighteenth century. The map extends from Delhi at the northwest to Patna and beyond in modern Bihar at the southeast. The backbone of the map is the Ganges River, which snakes from Delhi down past Agra, turns east at Allahabad and continues its southeastward course toward the Bay of Bengal. The map is the product of a French military cartographer, made in a period when the French were rapidly losing ground to the British in India. The Seven Years' War (1756-1763) resulted in the defeat of the French forces and limited French imperial ambitions. In 1757, the French were defeated at Calcutta and pushed out of Bengal. They soon suffered a similar fate in the south, where the British, after further advances, defeated them soundly at Wandiwash in 1760. French ambitions on Indian territories were effectively laid to rest with the Treaty of Paris in 1763, thereby eliminating a major source of economic competition for the British East India Company. Thus this map was made in the very years when the French were losing their hold on India. Such a map would have been kept in the strictest secrecy during this time when geographical knowledge was so closely intertwined with political domination. The foremost scholarly authority on maps of India, Susan Gole, has shared her insights and expertise on several matters relating to this "beautiful map," which she considers "a great advance on that of d'Anville of 1752 [considered the most accurate map to that date]." Gole estimates that it "was prepared about 1765-1770, either for use in the military struggle between the French and British in India, or by the Capuchins so they could know where to find safe haven and avoid the British." This map is not only remarkable for its aesthetics and history, but also for its geographic sophistication. Gole concludes simply that it "shows more up-to-date information than any other that I know of for the period." Not one of the standard reference books illustrates a map of comparable quality, from public or private collections anywhere in the world, for this time period. This is a map of national importance and oustanding aesthetic quality, worthy of any major art museum. Seller Inventory # 000503

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Suma de geografia que trata de todas: ENCISO, Martín Fernández
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About this Item: Jacob Cromberger, Seville, 1519. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Folio (271 x 198 mm), ff. [75], with a large woodcut of a sphere within woodcut border on title, and two diagrams in the text; bound without the final blank; the early leaves with old foliation in ink; the chronological list on f. 25 extended in ink to include Spanish kings up to the 18th century; the early leaves very gently cleaned; a very few minor marginal repairs and a few wormholes filled in; bound in 18th-century Spanish vellum, spine lettered in ink. A VERY ATTRACTIVE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST BOOK PRINTED IN SPANISH RELATING TO AMERICA, THE FIRST PRACTICAL GUIDE TO SAILING IN AMERICAN WATERS, AND THE FIRST NAVIGATIONAL MANUAL PRINTED IN SPAIN. ‘Enciso’s Suma de geographía (1519) is one of the cornerstones of Spanish cartographic and navigational literature in the first half of the sixteenth century. Although the book is known today mainly for containing the first printed description of America in Spanish, the Suma was in fact a synthesis of the geographic knowledge of all the known world’ (Andrès Prieto in: Hispanic Review, Vol. 78 (2010), p. 169). ‘Fernández de Enciso (ca.1470-ca.1528) was one of the earliest settlers in Santo Domingo, the capital of Hispaniola, where he practiced law and participated actively in sea expeditions. The Suma attempts to cover the world’s geography, but its most valuable information is the chapter on the West Indies. The word "America" was here used for the first time in a Spanish printed text . Using a great variety of both oral and written sources plus his own experience, Enciso compiled a practical book with useful information, especially for pilots. In his description of the natives he gives precise information about the distinct physical characteristics of each tribe as well as their particular attitude towards the Spanish’ (JCB, Spanish Historical Writing about the New World). ‘It is not known when, why, or with whom he went to America, but in 1508 [Enciso] was living on the island of Santo Domingo, where he had accumulated a fortune in the practice of law. In 1509 Alonzo de Ojeda (or Hojeda) had been granted the government of Terra Firme (the region about the Isthmus of Darien), but he lacked the funds necessary to colonize the country. He then applied to Enciso, who had the reputation of being rich, able, and adventurous, and the latter agreed to provide a vessel with men and provisions. Among his followers was one Vasco Nuñez de Balboa who afterwards became famous for his discovery of the Pacific Ocean, then called the South Sea (Mar del Sur), and who had joined the expedition without Enciso’s knowledge or authority, seeking to escape his creditors. Soon after the founding of the new city, Balboa stirred up rebellion among the men, and was able to depose Enciso, whom he banished to Spain. Here, the latter complained to the king of Balboa’s arbitrary conduct and injustice, and the king, partly owing to these accusations, sent Pedrarias Dávila to America in 1514 as Governor of Darien, with instructions to have the wrongs of Enciso righted. Enciso accompanied the expedition . and continued to oppose Balboa until the latter’s execution by Dávila in 1517. He soon afterwards returned to Spain where he published his "Suma de Geografia que trata de todas las partidas del mundo", the first account in Spanish of the discoveries in the New World. The work was published in 1519 at Seville and was reprinted in 1530 and in 1549 . Aaccording to Navarrete, Enciso has embodied all that was then known of the theory and practice of navigation. The geographical portion is given with great care, and contains the first descriptions of the lands discovered in the western seas . It is, on the whole, a more accurate work than the other early works of its kind’ (Catholic Encyclopedia).‘A great hydrographer and explorer, his work is invaluable for the early geographical history of this continent’ (Harrisse). Alden/Landis 519/4; Church 42; Harrisse 97; Palau 88433; Sabin 22551. Seller Inventory # cf27c4b3eedb8c35759d5e9012a80c54

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La Primera Parte Del Nuevo Gran Espejo: ROGGEVEEN, Arent
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About this Item: Jacob Robijn,, Amsterdam, 1690. Unrecorded Spanish edition of the First Sea Atlas of America Folio (450 by 280mm), title, privilege, [2]p. description of the earth, 67pp., 34 engraved charts (all double-page apart from the chart of Catalina), seventeenth century Spanish pig skin. One of the most important maritime atlases of the Dutch Golden Age. Roggeveen's work is the first maritime atlas of the American coasts, and was based largely on the closely guarded collection of mostly Iberian manuscript nautical charts owned by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and West India Company (WIC). It covers what it calls the West Indies, a term then interpreted much more broadly than today, including not only the entire Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico and Central America, but also part of South America and the entire east coast of what is now the United States and southern Canada. Arent Roggeveen (c.1628-1779) was born in Delfshaven, and came to Middelburg as a teacher in 1658. Familiar with mathematics and land-surveying and interested in astronomy, he quickly learned the arts of navigation. Middelburg boasted one of the most important chambers of both the VOC and WIC, therefore many of Roggeveen's students worked in the two companies. Through these connections he apparently gained access to the large collection of mostly Iberian manuscript sea charts that the companies had captured, copied by espionage, or commissioned (some American place names in Roggeveen's atlas still retain their Spanish forms). This collection had been closely guarded as a matter of national security during the Dutch war of independence from Spain. Even after 1648 it was still considered sensitive material, as it gave the Dutch merchants of the VOC and WIC an important commercial advantage. While some atlases largely copied maps from their predecessors, Roggeveen could therefore draw on this cartographic treasure trove to produce more accurate and more detailed sea charts than had ever been published before. The first edition of the atlas was published in 1675 by Pieter Goos, however, due to the death of Goos in the same year, and that of Roggeveen four years later, a second edition would not be published until 1680, by which time the plates had been acquired by the chart dealer Jacobus Robijn. Robijn went on to republish the second edition in 1689, with a third edition appearing in 1698. As well as Dutch the pilot also appeared with English, French, and - as with the present edition - Spanish text. We are unable to trace an institutional example of this edition. Koeman records six institutional examples of the 1680 Spanish edition. The charts and text would appear to be unchanged from the 1680 edition: with all the charts in their first state; the chart of Catalina is in its proof state; chart No. 7 bears revision to Curaçao plate; whilst the chart of Curaçao [No.7 1/2] bears no number. The only revision to the 1680 edition is the inclusion of a new title-page and privilege in which Roggeveen's name has been omitted and Jacob Robijn inserted in its place. c.f. Koeman Rog 10 for 1680 edition. Seller Inventory # 12009

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Primera y segunda parte dela historia general: LOPEZ DE GOMARA,

About this Item: Miguel Capila,, Caragoça, 1553. The first printed history of Mexico, and the first appearance of the name "California" to describe the West Coast of North America Two parts in one volume. First edition. Small folio (302 by 205mm). Gothic letter, two columns, woodcut title to part one printed in red and black, large woodcut of the arms of Cortes on title to part two, woodcut initials, two woodcut maps showing the new and the old world, woodcut of a bison on cxvi verso in part one, 262 leaves, 5 leaves (ai-iiii and ci supplied in facsimile), title, maps, and first few leaves with damage to sheet edges with small areas of loss skilfully repaired with reinstatement in ink facsimile, fiiii, gii, and miiii with small tear at foot, folio liii recto with the word "ygualar" without the cancel slip recorded on the copy at JCB, tiiii torn at lower right corner in first part, biiii, gii, and tiiii with small tears in second part, one line of text on verso of folio lvi in second part corrected by means of a printed overslip "narvaez" not previously recorded by other bibliographers, this example without the printed overslip on folio xxxvii noted on several previous examples. Contemporary vellum over boards, rebacked. Collation: [4]; a(4) (supplied in facsimile); b-z(4, with ci in facsimile); A-G(4); a-z(4); A-M(4). The first printed history of Mexico, the first appearance of the name "California" in print to describe the West Coast of North America, the first Spanish map to depict the entire American continent, and the first Spanish printed map to show the West Coast of North America. López de Gómara (1511-c1559) served as Cortés' chaplain and secretary from 1540, when the Conquistador returned to Spain. Although he himself had never been to the Americas, the author had ready access to primary source materials from his patron and others. Gómara organized the work in two parts, the first of which contains a dissertation on world geography, location of the Indies, Columbus' discoveries, colonization of Hispaniola and Peru. The second part presents Cortés' biography, the Conquest of Mexico, Cortés' travels to Cuba, Santo Domingo, Honduras, and his trips back to Mexico, the Francisco de Ulloa in 1539, and Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo in 1542. The second part also includes descriptions of the indigenous population in Mesoamerica at the time of the conquest. Each part stands alone as a distinct work. The book was first published in 1552 (known only by a single example held in John Carter Brown Library), and was almost immediately suppressed by an order of the Crown, dated November 17, 1553, requiring that all copies be seized and returned to the Consejo Real, and imposing a penalty of 200,000 maravedis on anyone who should reprint it. This was probably the reaction of the Crown to the claims of the Cortés family regarding their rights in Mexico, and Gómara's hagiography ran contrary to its purposes. Despite this, the work soon became widely known and was published in Paris, Venice, Rome, Antwerp, and London. "Gómara's history is a good history; he derived his information from the highest sources, and he wrote with an elegant brevity and a sense of arrangement that contrasted favourably with the rambling incoherencies of many of his contemporaries. Small wonder it was a favourite book of the time" (Boies Penrose). The work is of particular Californian interest as it records Cortés' expeditions to the western coast, the discovery and naming of California, (the first appearance of the name "California" in print (fol cxvii, verso)), the Ulloa voyages along the coast of Upper California, the preliminary journey to Cíbola of Fray Marcos de Niza, and the expedition to the fabled Seven Cities by Francisco Vázquez de Coronado. "Despite the fact that the cartography is very simple, with just a few placenames, it does show a remarkably accurate west coast of North America. 'C. de Vallenas' represents a misspelt Ballenas, or Cape of Whales. The far reaching voyage of Jacques Cartier up the St. Seller Inventory # 12309

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About this Item: Logroño, Miguel de Eguia, 3rd June 1529. Folio, ff. [4]; 32, woodcut initials, the title leaf expertly remargined along the lower and fore-edges (prior to 1927), with a very small area of penwork to the edge of the decoration, brown staining to about half the folios, a couple of other very small marginal repairs, contemporary [?]. Seller Inventory # 14347

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Itinerario de Ludovico de Verthema Bolognese ne: Varthema, Lodovico di.
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About this Item: Milan, Giovanni Angelo Scinzenzeler, (30 April 1523)., 1523. Octavo (185 x 130 mm). XLII ff. (A-E8, F2). Large woodcut on title with decorative woodcut border, putti above and below (Sander 7494 and pl. 93). Roman letter, numerous floriated white on black woodcut initials. Modern calf bound to style: covers with concentric frames in blind fillets, gilt fleurons at outer corners, central lozenge in gilt. Spine with five raised bands, lettered in gilt. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt. Second original Italian edition, second issue of Ludovico di Varthema's famous travels to Arabia, Persia, and India: the highly important and adventurous narrative containing the first recorded visit of a Westerner to Mecca. His description of the Hijaz is especially valuable as it pre-dates the Ottoman occupation of 1520. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [.] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [.] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give way to the all-seas route. He even heard of a southern continent and of a region of intense cold and very short days, being the first European probabl. Seller Inventory # 33683

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The West-India Pilot: Containing Piloting Directions for: Speer, Captain Joseph
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About this Item: For the Author and S. Hooper, London, 1771. Folio (16 x 10 2/8 inches). Advertisement leaf at end (lacking A2?). 26 exceptionally fine engraved folding maps all with original hand-colour in full (corners creased, one or two other creases at folds). Contemporary mottled calf, the spine in panels, each decorated with a fine gilt Dauphin crest tool. Provenance: with the crest of Louis XVI (1754 - 1793) Dauphin of France in the decorative panels of the spine; Christie's, 15 November 1978, lot 184; bought by Charles W. Traylen, Guildford, Surrey, for the library of Christopher Henry Beaumont Pease, Lord Wardington (1924-2005), his sale 10th October 2006 lot 486. Second edition, first published in 1766 with 13 maps, this copy inscribed and annotated "Examined and corrected by" the Author. This fine copy was possibly intended as a gift to the young Dauphin of France Louis, who later as Louis XVI Louis XVI actively supported the Americans in their revolution against Great Britain, but who was himself executed during the French Revolution in 1793. Captain Joseph Smith Speer was an English mariner who served 21 years on the Mosquito (Miskito) Coast in what is now Nicaragua. He later created detailed maps of the West Indies based on his first-hand knowledge of the region. In 1766 he published "The West-India Pilot" containing 13 maps, followed by an enlarged edition, as here, with 26 maps in 1771. Beginning in 1689, Britain fought a century-long series of wars with France and its ally, Spain. On three occasions prior to the French and Indian War, these hostilities spilled over into the western hemisphere where overseas colonies could provide important advantages. Britain and France competed to control the valuable fur trade on the North American mainland and the rich sugar production on the islands of the West Indies. By the end of the 17th century, the British had established flourishing colonial settlements along the Atlantic Coast in New England and in the Chesapeake Bay region. At the same time, France had founded small communities along the St. Lawrence River and had claimed the entire Mississippi River Valley, following the expeditions of French explorers Louis Joliet and René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. These North American colonies became part of an intense rivalry between Great Britain and France. Each country tried to equal or surpass the economic, political, and military power of the other through colonization, alliances, and warfare. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 concluding the Seven Years' War (including the French and Indian War), was signed by Britain and Hanover on one side and France and Spain on the other. France renounced to Britain the mainland of North America east of the Mississippi, its conquests in India since 1749, and the West Indian islands of Granada and the Grenadines. Britain restored to France the West Indian islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique and the West African colony of Gorée (Senegal). In return for recovering Havana and Manila, Spain ceded Florida to Britain and received Louisiana from the French. The fine maps in this beautiful atlas include many of Jamaica, Hispaniola, Honduras, Port O Rico, Saint Domingue, Cape Fear in North Carolina, Cuba, St. Domingo, Port au Price, and Vera CruzPhillips, Atlases 2698; Sabin 89248; Shirley, British Library M.SPR.1b. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Seller Inventory # 14-4-6

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The Navigation and v[o]yages of Lewes Vertomannus,: Varthema, Lodovico di.

About this Item: London, Richard Jugge, 1577., 1577. 4to. (4 [instead of 10]), 464 [instead of 466] ff. (wants the first 6 ff. of prelims, final 2 ff. of text and the 6 ff. of "special advices" and index, all supplied in facsimile). With historiated woodcut initials. Splendid modern red morocco, both covers richly gilt, gilt fillets to raised bands. Stored in custom-made cloth clamshell box with gilt spine title. The first English edition of Ludovico di Varthema's famous travels to Arabia, Persia, and India: the highly important and adventurous narrative containing the first recorded visit of a westerner to Mecca. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [.] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [.] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give way to the all-seas route. He even heard of a southern continent and of a region of intense cold and very short days, being the first European probably after Marco Polo to bring back the rumor of Terra Australis" (Cox I, 260). - Published as an extensive part of "The History of Travayle in the West and East Indies" - one of the first. Seller Inventory # 44757

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The English Pilot. The Fourth Book. Describing: MOUNT, William (1688-1769)

MOUNT, William (1688-1769) and Thomas PAGE (1704-1762).

Published by London: Printed by J. Mount, T. Page, W. Mount, 1764. (1764)

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About this Item: London: Printed by J. Mount, T. Page, W. Mount, 1764., 1764. Folio (18 4/8 x 12 4/8 inches). 11 large folding engraved charts, 11 double-page and 4 full-page charts, numerous woodcut coastal profiles and vignettes in the text (a bit browned). Contemporary speckled calf (rebacked to style, extremities a bit worn). Provenance: with the ownership inscription of William Willding dated 1768 on the front free endpaper; gift inscription of to Thomas Pugh from his mother at the head of the title-page dated 1906. "THE FIRST SIGNIFICANT COLLECTION OF CHARTS EXCLUSIVELY OF THE AMERICAN COASTS TO BE PUBLISHED IN ENGLAND" (Cumming) Of the sixty-four separate chart titles noted by Verner this copy contains large folding charts of ".the Western and Southern Oceans", " . the Coast of New Foundland from Cape Raze to Cape Bonavista.", ". the Coast of New-England, from Cape Codd to Casco Bay", "Virginia, Maryland, Pennsilvania, East & West New Jarsey", ".Hispaniola", the West Indies, "Cuba, Streights of Bahama, Windward Passage, the Current through the Gulf of Florida.", "Jamaica.", ". the Coast of Guyana, from the Entrance of the river Orinoco. to the Entrance of the River Amazon", ".the Trading Part of the West Indies", ".the Gulf of Darien & the Coast to Porto Bello with Panama in the South Sea & the Scotch Settlement in Calledonia". The double-page charts are of the "North part of America from New Found Land to Hudson's Bay", ".The West Indies", ".The Western Ocean", ".the Sea Coast of New Foundland, New Scotland, New England, New Jersey with Virginia and Maryland", "The Harbour of Casco Bay and Islands Adjacent", ".part of the Sea Coast of New Foundland from the Bay of Bulls to Little Placentia", "A Draught of New York from the Hook to New York Town", "A Draught of Virginia.", ". the Island of St. Christophers.", "A Large Draught of South Caroline from Cape Roman to Port Royall", ".the Caribee Islands"; and the full-page charts are of Barbados, Antigua, Bay of Matanzas, and Bermuda. The series of English Pilot books was started in 1671 by John Seller, whose charts derived from the Dutch pilot books of Pieter Goos. "Seller's English Pilot initiated the independent production of pilot books in England which ultimately overcame Dutch predominance" (Koeman). The work was so popular that 37 editions were published from 1689-1794, with the number of charts varying from 18 in the first edition to 26 in the last. "For British trading in North America and for the colonists there, the publication of The English Pilot: The Fourth Book must have been a godsend. For the first time an English sea atlas presented charts of the whole eastern seacoast of North America. To modern eyes the charts are crude and sparse of detail; but to the navigator of American waters in that period, it was his Bible. Whatever its shortcomings, there was really no substitute, no real competitor, for over sixty years" (William P. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, Chicago & London 1974, p.39). (William P. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, Chicago & London 1974, p.39). Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Seller Inventory # 72lib70

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About this Item: [Strassburg: Matthias Hüpfüff, 1513]., 1513. [7] leaves, including woodcut titlepage illustration (3 1/4 x 4 1/2 inches), plus final integral blank leaf. Quarto. Dbd., leather tab on foredge of first leaf. Slight soiling and dampstaining in margins. A very good copy. In a half morocco and cloth box. An extremely rare German translation of a newsletter first issued in Latin and published in Rome in 1513, reporting the Portuguese conquest of Malacca in 1511 and describing its rich potential as a commercial center. No copies of this seven-leaf edition are recorded in OCLC or RLIN, and only a single copy of another 1513 German translation, printed in Augsburg and consisting of five leaves, is located in the U.S., at the James Ford Bell Library. However, the British Library holds copies of both translations, and the imprint information for this edition is based on Robert Proctor's research on German books in the British Museum. The letter from Manuel I to Pope Leo X relates the conquest of Malacca by Portuguese military commander Afonso de Albuquerque in June 1511. In addition to providing details of this victorious battle, the report includes descriptions of the wealth to be found in the region and the importance of the city as a trading nexus. In particular, the text emphasizes how courteously the merchants were treated in order to ensure future commerce. Albuquerque's voyages and military exploits between 1503 and 1515 were instrumental in consolidating Portugal's expansion to India and Malaya. The present pamphlet also records his actions after he departed from Malaya and returned to Goa in 1512. These include descriptions of skirmishes with the Moors and embassies to other parts of India and Asia related to the payment of tribute to the Portuguese crown. As in the descriptions of Malacca, the potential wealth to be found in the region is emphasized. While the text of the pamphlet is entirely about the East Indies, the titlepage contains one of the earliest illustrations of an American Indian. The woodcut on the titlepage shows a native man and native woman on either side of an armorial shield immediately below a royal crown. The naked woman, with a flowering plant in her left hand, holds the bottom of the crown with her other hand as the man steadies the shield with his left hand and grasps a bow with his right hand. The man, with full beard, wears a feather crown, skirt, and leg decorations. This woodcut is exactly the same as that illustrating the titlepage of an earlier German newsletter reporting Portuguese activities in the East, Manuel I's GESCHICHTE KURTZLICH DURCH DIE VON PORTUGALIEN IN INDIA, MORENLAND, UND ANDERN ERDTRICH, published in Nuremburg circa 1507. This portrayal of the man, in turn, appears to be derived from images of South American Indians found in an illustrated Vespucci broadside printed in Nuremberg circa 1505-1506 (see EUROPEAN AMERICANA 505/11, and illustrated on the cover of the Wolfenbüttel exhibition catalogue) and broadsides based on Vespucci's third voyage printed in Augsburg circa 1505-1506 (EUROPEAN AMERICANA 505/13 and 505/14). The publisher of the present work also issued an illustrated edition of Vespucci in 1505, although not this one (see Church 22 for a reproduction). Of course, at this early time Europeans might well have supposed that the East Indians of Malacca and the natives Vespucci encountered in the New World were the same people. All of these broadsides and pamphlets, including the present work, were published within seven or eight years in three different centers of German printing. A remarkably rare early German newsletter reporting on Portuguese military and commercial activities in Malacca and India. No copies on OCLC, or VD16; a single copy located at the British Library. PROCTOR, INDEX OF GERMAN BOOKS 1501-1520 IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM, p.31, no. 10035. BELL M125 (variant translation, [5] leaves). OCLC 35837666 (variant translation, [5] leaves, James Ford Bell only). HOWGEGO A43 (Albuquerque). PENROSE SALE 156 (for wood. Seller Inventory # WRCAM 38334

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Treaties, Agreements, and Engagements between the Honorable: THOMAS, R. Hughes

THOMAS, R. Hughes (ed.)

Published by Bombay: printed for the Government at the Bombay Education Society's Press, 1851-3 (1851)

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About this Item: Bombay: printed for the Government at the Bombay Education Society's Press, 1851-3, 1851. Large octavo. Period-style half calf, black morocco double lettering-pieces, top edge gilt, the others sprinkled red. Occasional very slight edge chipping due to paper; final leaf shows loss of the top corner (barely touching the page number on the recto, while the verso is blank). Library stamp of the School of Oriental and African Studies (at the University of London) on top edge With a hand-coloured illustration of the Arab flag on p. 21. First and only edition. The earliest and rarest of the great collections of treaties closed between the British Government and local rulers in the western part of the expanding British Empire – most importantly, the accords reached with the sheikhdoms of the Arabian Gulf, the Wahhabis, the territory of Bahrain, and the so-called "Maritime Tribes" of the Arabian coast, or the "Trucial Arab Chiefs". No copies recorded at auction, just 4 on Copac - LSE, SOAS, BL, and Oxford, OCLC adds LoC, the library of the Canadian parliament, the Dutch Royal Library, California State Library, and the universities Texas at Austin, Washington. While a number earlier compilations were produced for the use of political agents they were far from complete and were deeply flawed by the presence of editorial inaccuracies such as erroneous dates, the omission of words and even of entire sentences. In order to purge the document of these errors, which had been repeated and amplified throughout successive editions, Thomas based his work on bona fide copies in the government records, in the process locating and including "numerous Treaties, Engagements, &c. never before printed, the existence of many of which appears not to have been known to the Compilers of previous works" (prefatory remarks). More than a decade later, the Indian civil servant C. U. Aitchison would compile perhaps best-known collection of this type, the highly sought-after but more commonly available, seven volume "Collection of Treaties, Engagements, and Sunnuds, Relating to India and Neighbouring Countries". This was subsequently often reissued and expanded, however it is worth noting that the relevant volume in Aitchison's work was markedly shorter than Thomas's earlier counterpart: in the original 1865 edition, it comprised merely 726 pages, less than three quarters of the present work's scope. The treaties paint a vivid picture of political relations between the increasingly dominant British government and the independent tribes who ruled the Gulf coast. Significantly, the contemporary rulers and their territories - in the then-current spellings: "Aboothabee", "Amulgavine", "Debaye", "Ras-ool-Khymah", and "Ejman", as well as the "Joasmee" and "Beniyas" tribes are noted by name. Of principal importance is the Preliminary Treaty with Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi, signed at Ras-al-Kaimah on 6 January 1820 (following General Keir's controversial 1819 expedition to the Gulf), by which the Sultan agreed to surrender "towers, guns, and vessels which are in Shargah, Iman, Amul-gavine, and their dependencies"; similar treaties were made with the other Sheikhs of the coast. Two days later followed the "General Treaty with the Arab Tribes of the Gulf", issued at Ras-al- Khaimah on January 8, which established "a lasting peace between the British Government and the Arab Tribes" a "cessation of plunder and piracy by land and sea" and – famously – the design of the "Blood-Red Arab Flag", as it has been called, "a red flag in a border of white, the breadth of the white in the border being equal to the breadth of the red, known in the British Navy by the title of 'White-pierced-red'" (with a hand-coloured illustration in the text). Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi signed the treaty at midday on Friday, the 4th of February 1820. Soon after, on February 6th, an agreement of peace was made between "Shaikh Ulmas Shaikh Ameer, Sultan bin Suggur bin Rashid Joasmee" and the East India Company, signed at Bandar Abbas, whereby the EIC and the Sultan declared to honour their re. Seller Inventory # 126115

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Thomas, R. Hughes (ed.).

Published by Bombay, printed for the Government at the Bombay Education Society's Press, 1851 (with Supplements to 1853). (1853)

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About this Item: Bombay, printed for the Government at the Bombay Education Society's Press, 1851 (with Supplements to 1853)., 1853. Large 8vo. (4), XXXV, (1), 953, (1) pp. With a hand-coloured illustration of the Arab flag on p. 21. Period-style half calf with double giltstamped black spine labels. All edges sprinkled in red but top edge gilt. The earliest and rarest of the great collections of treaties closed between the British Government and local rulers in the western part of the expanding British Empire - most importantly, the accords reached with the sheikhdoms of the Arabian Gulf, the Wahhabis, the territory of Bahrain, and the so-called "Maritime Tribes" of the Arabian coast, or the "Trucial Arab Chiefs". While a number of earlier compilations of the kind were produced for the use of political agents, they were far from complete and furthermore were flawed by editorial inaccuracies such as erroneous dates, the omission of words and even of entire sentences, etc. These errors, repeated and amplified throughout successive editions, Thomas set out to correct in the present collection by for the first time basing his work on bona fide copies in the government records, and he managed to include "numerous Treaties, Engagements, &c. never before printed, the existence of many of which appears not to have been known to the Compilers of previous works" (prefatory remarks). More than a decade later, the Indian civil servant C. U. Aitchison would compile the perhaps best-known set of its kind, the still highly sought but more commonly available "Collection of Treaties, Engagements, and Sunnuds, Relating to India and Neighbouring Countries" in seven volumes (subsequently often reissued and expanded), and it is worth noting that the relevant volume in his series was markedly shorter than Thomas's earlier counterpart: in Aitchison's original 1865 edition, it comprised merely 726 pages, less than three quarters of the present work's scope! - The treaties paint a vivid picture of the political relations between the increasingly dominant British government and the independent tribes who ruled the Gulf coast. Significantly, the contemporary rulers and their territories (in then-current spelling: "Aboothabee", "Amulgavine", "Debaye", "Ras-ool-Khymah", and "Ejman", as well as the "Joasmee" and "Beniyas" tribes) are noted by name. Of principal importance is the Preliminary Treaty with Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi, signed at Ras-al-Kaimah on 6 January 1820 (following General Keir's controversial 1819 expedition to the Gulf), by which the Sultan agreed to surrender "towers, guns, and vessels which are in Shargah, Iman, Amulgavine, and their dependencies"); similar treaties were made with the other Sheikhs of the coast. Two days later followed the "General Treaty with the Arab Tribes of the Gulf", issued at Ras-al- Khaimah on January 8, which established "a lasting peace between the British Government and the Arab Tribes", a "cessation of plunder and piracy by land and sea" and - famously - the design of the "Blood-Red Arab Flag", as it has been called, "a red flag in a border of white, the breadth of the white in the border being equal to the breadth of the red, known in the British Navy by the title of 'White-pierced-red'" (with a hand-coloured illustration in the text). Sultan bin Saqer Al Qasimi signed the treaty at midday on Friday, the 4th of February 1820. Soon after, on February 6th, an agreement of peace was made between "Shaikh Ulmas Shaikh Ameer, Sultan bin Suggur bin Rashid Joasmee" and the East India Company, signed at Bandar Abbas, whereby the EIC and the Sultan declared to honour their respective flags, property, dependents and subjects. Also contained are, among several others, the text of the agreements entered into by Sultan bin Saqer on 17 April 1838, 3 July 1839, and 30 April 1847 (for the prevention of the slave trade), of the ten-year Maritime Truce signed on 1 June 1843 by Sultan bin Saqer and the other Sheikhs of the Arabian coast, and - in a Supplement - the ensuing Treaty of Peace in Perpetuity, which was entered into in 1853. - Of the three Supple. Seller Inventory # 47819

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Die Gesantschaft der Ost-Indischen Geselschaft in den: NIEUHOF, Johan.

About this Item: Cordier, Sinica, col. 2346; Howgego, to 1800, G85 & N25; Landwehr & V.d. Krogt, VOC 541 note; Tiele, Bibl. 801 note; Walravens, China illustrata 64. Second edition of the German translation of "the definitive account" (Howgego) of the embassy that the VOC (Dutch East India Company) sent to the Emperor of China, the entire trip occupying the years 1655 to 1657. Nieuhof's eyewitness account was the first extensively illustrated book describing China and is, among works on China, "bis heute eines der bedeutendsten und gesuchtesten" (Walravens). The second part gives a general description of the Chinese empire, including botany and zoology. The first part covers the East Indies and Southeast Asia before going on to China itself. Japan, Korea and Formosa appear as well.Nieuhof (1618-1672) joined the VOC in Batavia by 1655 after an earlier voyage to Brazil with the West India Company. He served as steward, artist and chronicler on Pieter de Goyer and Jacob de Keyzer's VOC embassy to the Chinese Emperor. While the embassy was more successful than the Russian one shortly before (which was not even granted an audience), the Jesuits in the Chinese court hindered contacts between the Emperor and the Protestant Dutch as much as they could. The party nevertheless got a more intimate view of China than almost any other Dutch visitors of the 17th century, and the breadth of Nieuhof's interests and the large number of drawings he made provided a wealth of new material that makes the present work an essential primary source. Nieuhof apparently didn't return to the Netherlands until 1670, but sent his manuscript and drawings.Slightly thumbed, some occasional browning and minor foxing, a few water stains, restorations to the engraved title-page and the folding map with folds reinforced, still a good copy and the binding in very good condition. An essential primary source for any study of seventeenth-century China and especially its relations with the Netherlands, coloured by a contemporary hand. Seller Inventory # I7D9UY1I5WOZ

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Select Views in India, drawn on the: HODGES, William (1744-1797)

HODGES, William (1744-1797)

Published by printed for the author, and sold by J.Edwards, London (1787)

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About this Item: printed for the author, and sold by J.Edwards, London, 1787. Imperial folio. (22 1/4 x 17 inches). Title and text in English and French. 1 uncoloured engraved map, 48 aquatint plates, printed in two or more colours, all hand-coloured to resemble watercolours, by and after William Hodges. Contemporary red straight-grained morocco gilt by Staggemeir & Welcher, covers with elaborate border formed from an outer border of a palmette and anthemion roll flanked by fillets with cornerpieces of various small tools centered around a star, and an inner border of stylized scrolling foliage, flower-heads and barley sheaves with large circular tools at each corner, expertly rebacked to style, the spine in eight compartments with double raised bands, the others with repeat decoration of various small tools around a central Apollo sun-burst tool, the head and foot of the spine with areas decorated with an assortment of horizontal decorative rolls, gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, morocco hinges, gilt edges Provenance: Thomas Greer (armorial bookplate) A fine copy of the very rare hand-coloured issue of Hodges' pioneering work on the architectural and picturesque wonders of India. One of the greatest of all colour-plate books, this copy in a lovely binding by the most fashionable London binders of the time. This work, the main fruit of Hodges six year stay in India, was published with the plates in three separate forms: uncoloured, uncoloured proofs or with the plates hand-coloured to resemble the original watercolours, as here. The images were printed lightly in a single operation using two (sepia and blue) or more colours applied where desired to a single plate. These prints were then coloured by hand (probably by Hodges himself) with great freedom but with careful attention being paid to achieving a depth of colour and shading only possible through the repeated over-painting of contrasting pigments. The results are in a different class to some of the more pedestrian mass-produced works of the period and have all the idiosyncratic vibrancy of the original watercolours. They also offer an accurate reflection of the astonishment and wonder that Hodges felt on arriving in India in early 1780: "The clear blue cloudless sky, the polished white buildings, the bright sandy beach, the dark green sea, present a combination totally new to the eye of an Englishman, just arrived from London, who, accustomed to the sight of rolling masses of clouds floating in a damp atmosphere, cannot but contemplate the difference with delight." Born in London the son of a blacksmith, William Hodges was employed as an errand-boy in Shipley's drawing school, where in his spare time he learned to draw. The landscape painter Richard Wilson (1714-1782) noticed him and took him on as his assistant and pupil, and by 1766 Hodges was exhibiting in his own right. In 1772, through the interest of Lord Palmerston (1739-1802) a member of the board of Admiralty, he was appointed as draughtsman to Captain James Cook's second expedition to the South Seas. He returned in 1775 and was employed by the Admiralty in working up his drawings of the expedition and in supervising the engraving of the plates for Cook's published account of the expedition. He exhibited a number of pictures inspired by the voyage at the Royal Academy in London in 1776 and 1777. Life in London must have seemed quite restrained after his South Sea experiences, and after ending his contract with the Admiralty and following the death of his wife, he left for India in 1778. "But the first year in India was disappointing. Hodges health was poor and the Second Mysore War . was in progress . he was confined to Madras and its immediate environs. On moving to Calcutta in February 1781, however, he was to travel far more widely through the generosity and patronage of the Governor-General Warren Hastings . During 1781 Hodges made two tours up-country with him during which he saw the ruins of many Muslim palaces, tombs and mosques. The next year he found a patron in Augustus Cleveland, a liberal adm. Seller Inventory # 25064

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BEN SHE.YI MING

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From: liu xing (JiangSu, JS, China)

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About this Item: paperback. Condition: Good. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.1963 edition of the He Xiangning Poetry and set IndiaFour Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back. Seller Inventory # RQ009607

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About this Item: paperback. Condition: New. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.Hands of of Mr. Zhou Jimu Gengshen (1920) school-based Song carved Ming of India Chi Sau Domoto Ancient NoteFour Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back. Seller Inventory # AN016548

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Epistola potentissimi ac invictissimi Emanuelis Regis Portugaliae: Albuquerque, Afonso de]

Albuquerque, Afonso de] - Manuel I, King of Portugal.

Published by (Vienna, Hieronymus Vietor & Johannes Singriener, 16. IX. 1513). (1513)

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About this Item: (Vienna, Hieronymus Vietor & Johannes Singriener, 16. IX. 1513)., 1513. 4to. (8) pp. Modern brown half calf over marbled boards with gilt spine title. A highly important letter by King Manuel to the Pope Leo X, reporting on the great victories of Don Afonso de Albuquerque in India, especially the conquest of Malacca in 1511. Albuquerque (1453-1515) advanced the three-fold Portuguese grand scheme of combatting Islam and securing the trade of spices and the establishment of a vast Portuguese Asian empire. He was the first European to enter the Arabian Gulf, led the first voyage by a European fleet into the Red Sea, and was also the first westerner to reach the coast of South-Eastern Arabia. This very rare Viennese edition (the fourth altogether) was printed in the same year as the original Rome edition. The preface states that the text from which it was set was sent from Rome to Georg Slatkonia, Bishop of Vienna. "Of this edition, copies must have been so rare even as early as the late 16th century, that neither Andreas and Franz Schott nor Pistorius had knowledge of it. Necessarily, this increases the value of the present edition" (Denis, p. 83). - Some dampstaining in the margins; lower edge shows slight paper flaws. Old ownership in ink, dated 1600, in margin of final page. Latterly in the library of Swedish antiquarian bookdealer Björn Löwendahl (1941-2013). VD 16, P 4374. Denis p. 82, no. 86. Not in Adams or BM-STC German. Seller Inventory # 46091

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Epistola potentissimi ac invictissimi Emanuelis Regis Portugaliae,: MANUEL I, King

About this Item: M. Denis, Wiens Buchdruckergeschicht (1782), no. 86 (p. 82); Porbase (1 copy); USTC 651577 (2 copies); VD16, P4374 ; cf. Howgego A43. Rare second(?) edition (published about five weeks after the first) of an extremely important letter by King Manuel I of Portugal to Pope Leo X, proudly reporting the victories of Don Afonso de Albuquerque in India and the East Indies, especially his conquest of Malacca in 1511-1512. Albuquerque (1453-1515) advanced the three-fold Portuguese grand scheme of combatting Islam, securing the Portuguese trade in spices and establishing a vast Portuguese empire in Asia. He was the first European to enter the Arabian Gulf, led the first voyage by a European fleet into the Red Sea, and was also the first westerner to reach the coast of southeastern Arabia.With an owner's inscriptions. With some marginal stains and restorations, the stains slightly affecting a word or two in the lower outside corner of some pages, but otherwise in very good condition. Binding fine. Rare and important account of the Portuguese conquests in India and especially the East Indies. Seller Inventory # J3RB0L9S1CM2

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ARRIAGA, Pablo José

Published by Geronymo de Contreras, Lima (1621)

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About this Item: Geronymo de Contreras, Lima, 1621. Hardcover. Condition: Near Fine. (8) ff., 142 (ie 137) pp., (3) ff. Elaborate woodcut tailpiece on fol. **3v. With pastedowns and endleaves from a contemporary 4to liturgical service book printed in red and black. Bound in contemporary flexible vellum. Early ownership inscription of the second Jesuit college in the Americas, ¿El Collegio de S. P[edr]o y S. Pablo¿ on title page, and personal ownership inscription in an early hand of a Jesuit father, Padre Diego de Lacios [?] on the front cover. Vellum somewhat shrunken due to age, exposing margin of a few leaves to minor soiling, otherwise an extremely crisp copy, excellent. A fine and very genuine copy of the rare first edition of Pablo José de Arriaga¿s rich account of the Indians of Peru at the turn of the 17th century. Intended as a manual to help clerics identify native ¿superstitions¿, the work is filled with minute details describing Indian ceremonies, medicines, and beliefs. Thanks to the all too effective execution of Arriaga¿s duties, the Extirpacion de la Idolatria del Piru ironically remains the original go-to source for much ethnographic and anthropological information on the very cultures he was trying to eradicate. Recorded by an eye-witness on the eve of the final cultural obliteration of Incan and pre-Incan civilizations in the 17th century, Arriaga¿s account is one of the earliest ethnographic records of post-Conquest Peru and an essential source for the historical reconstruction of now-lost Peruvian cultures. ¿In spite of its brutality, the book is a rich trove of Andean ethnography.¿ (JCB, ¿Sources of Peru¿) Because of their ¿simplicity and poor understanding¿ and their all too recent introduction to the faith, the Indians of the New World were not subject to the authority of the Holy Inquisition. The task of stamping out heresy instead fell to independent contractors ¿ local bishops and religious leaders ¿ who established a system in Peru modeled in essence on the Inquisition, but subject to far less regulation (cf. Griffiths, ¿The Inquisitorial Model and the Repression of Andean Religion in Seventeenth-Century Peru¿). Arriving from Spain and distressed to find native heresies thriving after one hundred years of evangelization, figures such as the Archbishop of Lima Bartolomé Lobo Guerrero, the Spanish Viceroy Francisco de Borja, and the Jesuit Provincial Pablo José de Arriaga all spearheaded vicious and concerted campaigns during the early 17th century to wipe out all traces of native religion and superstition. Only Arriaga, however, produced a written record of his work. . A sought-after Americanum, the Extirpacion de la Idolatria del Piru has not appeared at Anglo-American auction in more than half a century. The present copy is in an unusually fine contemporary state, bearing an early exlibris of the missionary training College of San Pedro y San Pablo in Mexico City where, presumably, it was used to equip missionaries before heading into the field. OCLC shows copies at Cornell, Arizona, the Newberry, Bryn Mawr, the Rosenbach Museum, SMU, and the JCB. * Sabin 2106; Adventures in Americana, 82; Palau I, 119; not in Church. Cf also Medina, La Imprenta en Lima, Vol 1 no. 92 (devoting 77 pages to this book); The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas, p. 850; Dorsey, A Bibliography of the Anthropology of Peru, p. 66 (¿relates native religious beliefs and practices in minute detail¿); and Mills¿ monograph, Idolatry and Its Enemies: Colonial Andean Religion and Extirpation, 1640-1750 (Princeton University Press, 1997). Seller Inventory # 5149

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Epistola potentissimi ac invictissimi Emanuelis Regis Portugaliae: MANUEL (King of

MANUEL (King of Portugal).

Published by Rome Jacob Mazochius 9th August (1513)

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About this Item: Rome Jacob Mazochius 9th August, 1513. Small 4to (20 x 14.5 cm), 4 pp., modern full morocco gilt, a fine example. Rare. The highly important letter from King Manuel to Pope Leo X, announcing the capture of Malacca by Albuquerque, a victory which gave Portugal control of the trade routes to South-east Asia, and thus access to the wealth of the Spice Islands and the sea route to China. Our copy appears to be from an unrecorded edition. It has the same colophon as the first edition but is printed in smaller type on two, rather than six, leaves. It is possibly a pirate edition from the same time. Later editions appeared in Vienna and Stassbourg. After the capture of Malacca by the Portuguese under Albuquerque in 1511 (which became known in Europe in 1513), King Manuel dispatched letters to Rome informing the Papacy of Portugal's progress. This mattered greatly to Manuel as there was a perceived need to settle the question of demarcation between Spain and Portugal in this area which was important for control of the Spice Islands. Pope Leo X, newly elected that Spring, was the son of Lorenzo the Magnificent and effectively the leading Medici and ruler of Florence, who represented the traditional favourable disposition to Portugal of Florentine merchants. In addition, Portugal had a good record in defeating Muslims and thus advancing Christianity. It was no surprise therefore that public celebrations of thanksgiving were held in Rome shortly after news of Albuquerque's victory in Malacca was announced. Lach I, 166-167; Streit IV, 380-382. Seller Inventory # 97381

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The West-India Islands; From Actual Survey and: JEFFERYS, Thomas ((1719-1771),

JEFFERYS, Thomas ((1719-1771), et al.

Published by London: Robert Laurie and James Whittle, 1796. (1796)

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About this Item: London: Robert Laurie and James Whittle, 1796., 1796. JEFFERYS, Thomas (1719-1771), et al. The West-India Islands; From Actual Survey and Observations: Eighteen Correct Maps: With Plans of Most of the Distinguished Harbours. London: Robert Laurie and James Whittle, 1796. Folio (21 x 15 2/8 inches). Letterpress title-page, 12 leaves of letterpress text (first page of text a bit spotted). 18 EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved maps with MAGNFICENT CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLOUR, WITH PERFECT OXIDIZATION OF THE GREEN PIGMENT by Jefferys, Robert Wilkinson, one by Faden (Granada), two by John Byres, and one each by D'Anville, James Waring, Robert Baker, Daniel Paterson and Van Keulen, all but two double-page, extra-illustrated with an additional map: "Plan of the Isle of Trinidad from the actual Surveys made in the Year 1797," (London: Laurie and Whittle, 1800), engraved vignette head-piece (some occasional pale spotting and offsetting, a few short splits along folds). Modern half calf antique, marbled boards, by Michael Wilcox. Provenance: with the small library label of Wolfgang A. Herz, on the front pastedown, his sale "Important Voyages and Travels", 9th December 2009, lot 289. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE collection of maps of the islands of the West Indies, prefaced by the 24-page "General View of the West Indies" from Jefferys's "West India Atlas" first published London: Sayer and Bennett, 1775. 16 of the maps were published by Laurie and Whittle; 14 of them are dated 1794, one is dated 1795, and the additional map of Trinidad is dated 1800. Described on the title-page as a "New Edition", first published with this title, but with "Seventeen Correct Maps" by Sayer and Bennett in 1775. A New and Complete Map of the West Indies. Comprehending all the Coasts and Islands known by that name. By Mons.r D'Anville; with Several Emendations and Improvements. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. Double-page and folding. Jamaica from the Latest Surveys; Improved and Engraved by Thomas Jefferys. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. With two insets: The Harbour of Bluefields; The Harbours of Kingston and Port Royal. Double-page. Ruatan or Ratan, surveyed by Lieutenant Henry Barnsley, with improvements by Thomas Jefferys. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. With two insets of Old Providence and Sta Catalina; New Port-Royal Harbour as Surveyed by Lieutenant Barnsley. Double-page. The Windward Passage, with the Several Passages, from the East End of Cuba, and the North part of St. Domingo. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. Double-page and folding. The Virgin Islands from English and Danish Surveys, by Thomas Jefferys, corrected and Improved by Captain James Waring. London: Laurie & Whittle, [no date]. With two insets: Plan of Peters Island; Harbour or Road of Tortola. Double-page. St. Christophers, or St. Kitts, surveyed by Anthony Ravell Esq, London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. With an inset: Nevis. Double-page. Antigua, surveyed by Robert Baker, Surveyor General of that Island. Engraved and Improved by Thomas Jefferys. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. With an inset of English Harbour. Double-page. Guadeloupe, Done from Actual Surveys and Observations of the English, whilst the Island was in their Possession, with material Improvements added since the Conquest in 1794 to those made by Thomas Jefferys. London: Laurie & Whittle, 1st Jan.y, 1795. Double-page. Dominica from an Actual Survey Compleated in the Year 1773. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. Double-page. Martinico, Done from Actual Surveys and Observations, made by English Engineers whilst the Island was in the Possession by Thomas Jefferys, Lately improved by an Officer. London: Laurie & Whittle, 1st Sept.r, 1798. With two insets: Cul de Sac Royal; Gallion Harbour. Double-page. St. Lucia; Done from Surveys and Observations made by the English whilst in their Possession by Thomas Jefferys. London: Laurie & Whittle, 12th May, 1794. With an inset Plan of the Carenage. Double-page. Barbadoes, survey. Seller Inventory # 002451

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Twenty-Four Views in St. Helena, the Cape,: SALT, Henry.

SALT, Henry.

Published by London: William Miller, 1 May 1809 (1809)

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About this Item: London: William Miller, 1 May 1809, 1809. Large folio (751 × 534 mm). Original marbled boards, with red morocco patch title label to the front cover, rebacked and recornered in red morocco to style, title gilt direct to spine, wide, flat bands with geometric panels, compartments ornately gilt with foliate arabesque rolls and roundels. Sides lightly rubbed, light toning and a few trivial marks chiefly in fore-edge margins, a very good copy with fine hand-colouring throughout. Uncoloured sepia aquatint title incorporating dedication, and 24 aquatint views by D. Havell, J. Hill and J. Buck under the supervision of Robert Havell, with fine, original hand-colour. on thick paper watermarked J. Whatman 1824. Bookplate of Thomas Swinnerton Armiger, one of the founders of the Hunterian Society, to front pastedown. First edition, with plates watermarked 1824. Having failed in his original ambition to be a portrait painter, Salt set out on an eastern tour in June 1802 as secretary and draughtsman to Viscount Valentia. "He visited India, Ceylon, and the Red Sea, and in 1805 was sent by Valentia on a mission into Abyssinia, to the ras of Tigré, whose affection and respect he gained, and with whom he left one of his party, Nathaniel Pearce. The return to England in 1806 was made by way of Egypt, where he first met the pasha, Mehmet Ali. Lord Valentia's Travels in India (1809) was partly written and completely illustrated by Salt, who published his own 24 Views in St Helena, India and Egypt in the same year" (ODNB). In emulation of a successfully proven format, the work was published "in the same size and style as Daniell's Series of Oriental Scenery", according to an advertisement in the text which is very occasionally found with this work but which, Tooley opined, "is not important and the work is usually to be found without it." Very often the two Egyptian plates, offering fine views of Cairo and the Pyramids, being rather larger in image size than the other subjects, are found trimmed with slight loss of image. This is not the case here. Abbey Travel 515; Howgego, I, S6; Tooley 440. Seller Inventory # 71620

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Yang, Anand A.

Published by University of California Press

ISBN 10: 0520210999 ISBN 13: 9780520210998

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About this Item: University of California Press. Hardcover. Condition: Good. 0520210999 This book is shelved in the Business & Economics section of our retail store and may require extra shipping time - Crisp clean unmarked and unread hardcover with light shelfwear to the boards (no dust jacket) remainder mark to one edge - NICE!. Seller Inventory # Z0520210999Z3

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Lopes de Castanheda, Fernao:

Published by London: Thomas East, 1582. (1582)

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About this Item: London: Thomas East, 1582., 1582. 170 leaves. Titlepage with woodcut border device, woodcut initials throughout the text. Small quarto. 19th-century calf, ruled in blind, gilt Pegasus device on front board, spine gilt, leather labels. Binding lightly rubbed and shelfworn. Small closed tear in upper margin of titlepage. Ex- Inner Temple Library, with their bookplate on front pastedown, two ink stamps on titlepage (below ornamental border), one on first page of text and another on verso of colophon. Very good. The first English edition of one of the most important historical works of the first great age of discovery, translating the first book of Castanheda's work, originally published in Coimbra in 1551. Translated by Nicholas Lichefield, this edition is appropriately dedicated to Sir Francis Drake. Most of the .HISTORIE. is devoted to the great Portuguese thrust into Asia in the early 16th century, chronicling their epic expansion to India, the East Indies, and China between 1497 and 1525. Castanheda himself spent some two decades in the Portuguese colonies in the East, and so was well equipped to write this account. It is one of the primary sources for the early Portuguese trading empire, a model the British were beginning to emulate at the time of publication. Penrose says of the author: ".he wrote an impartial book of outspoken sincerity which was the fruit of years of residence in the East." "A most interesting and rare book" - Sabin. This work is equally important for its American content, being the first to describe in detail the voyage of Cabral and his discovery of Brazil in 1500, while on his way to the East Indies. Cabral's landing is the first recorded there, recounted in chapters 29-31 of the present work. "This English edition is very rare" - Hill. Not in Church. This work has become difficult to find. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 582/54. HILL 1035. BORBA DE MORAES, pp.166-67. Penrose, TRAVEL AND DISCOVERY IN THE RENAISSANCE, pp.274- 79. STC 16806. SABIN 11391. STREETER SALE 26. Seller Inventory # WRCAM 41698

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About this Item: paperback. Condition: Good. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.Paperback. Pub Date :1988-12 Publisher: Rong Bao Zhai editing. publishing Rongbaozhai edit. publish. published in December 1988. large 16 Paperback. 9.5 Goods. The Total exhibition 222 works. by experts. not a fake (see catalog descriptions). these works have a lot of shot in the major auction. : Any Bonian. Qi Baishi. Xu Beihong. Wu Changshuo. Huang. Fu Baoshi. Pan Tianshou. Wu Zuoren. Li Keran. Qian Songyan. Song Wenzhi. Chen Banding. Wu Guanzhong. Benjamin. Cheng Shifa. Fan Zeng. Guan Liang. Lu Yanshao WANG. Li Yan. Xie Zhiliu. Huang Zhou. Shi Lu. Zhao Wangyun all famous for!Four Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back. Seller Inventory # RL076207

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BEN SHE.YI MING

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From: liu xing (JiangSu, JS, China)

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About this Item: paperback. Condition: New. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.India studying history (manuscripts)Four Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back. Seller Inventory # AY008680

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Twenty four views taken in St. Helena,: SALT, Henry

SALT, Henry

Published by London William Miller (1809)

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About this Item: London William Miller, 1809. First edition. Landscape folio (80 x 57 cm.), pictorial aquatint title, 24 fine hand-coloured aquatint plates, engraved by D. Havell after Henry Salt, all without the slightest foxing, early watermarks all pre-publication, on Whatman paper ranging from 1794 to 1806. Originally bound in portrait format now re- arranged in landscape, rebacked and edged in leather retaining the original marbled boards, with a new morocco label. A remarkable example of one of the most attractive of all colour-plate books, intended by its publisher to be a continuation of the Daniells' Oriental Scenery, being uniform in size, style, and execution. The copy of the Governor of Bengal, with early watermarks, which is rare. The colouring in these early copies is distinctly superior, a more muted and subtle palette being employed. George Annesley, Viscount Valentia, left England in June 1802 on the Minerva, for a Grand Tour of the East with Henry Salt. They were antiquarians and avid collectors. Salt had earlier finished his training with the topographical draughtsman and diarist, Joseph Farrington, and Valentia appointed him to be his official artist and secretary for the tour. The plates include fine views of Chowringhee; the fort of Jaunpur; 2 aquatints of Lucknow including the mosque in the Great Imambara; the great Temple at Tanjore; Poona; the Chaitya Cave; 2 fine aquatints of Cairo; Cape Town, etc. Valentia and Salt returned to England in 1806. Salt eventually became British Consul-General in Egypt, where he died aged 47. Abbey, Travel, 515; Tooley 440. Seller Inventory # 92098

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COMENTARIVS DE REBVS IN INDIA: TEIVE, Diogo de.

TEIVE, Diogo de.

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About this Item: Hard Cover. Condition: Good. APVD DIVM GESTIS ANNO SALVTIS NOSTRAE M . D. XLVI. [1546] Iacobo Teuio Lusitani Autore. [Escudo Real Português Armoriado]. CONIMBRICAE. M. D. XLVIII. [1548]. [Colofon:] EXCVDEBANT IOANNES BARREIVS & Ioannes Aluarus Typographi Regij. In 4º (de 19x13 cm) com [viii], 92 pags. Encadernação artística da época, inteira de pele com ferros rolados a seco sobre as pastas e nas esquadrias das mesmas com motivos florais. Exemplar com assinatura de posse (datada de 1970) na follha de guarda. Primeira edição rarissima de uma obra com um comentário à história dos portugueses na Índia e às conquistas dos Vice-Reis, escrita pelo um famoso humanista português Diogo de Teive (ca. 1514-ca. 1565). Um dos mais importantes relatos do segundo cerco de Diu que constituiu um dos mais celebrados feitos heróicos dos portugueses no Oriente. O Segundo Cerco à fortaleza portuguesa de Diu pelas forças do sultanato do Guzerate, capitaneadas por Coge Sofar, mercador e senhor de Surrate, teve lugar entre Abril e Novembro de 1546. Este acontecimento, de incontestável importância para o "Estado da Índia", definiu a governação do Vice-Rei D. João de Castro (1545-1548) e representou a derradeira tentativa guzerate para retomar a fortaleza de Diu, anteriormente entregue aos portugueses em 1535. Inocencio II, 176. [não refere esta obra] 'DIOGO DE TEIVE, natural da cidade de Braga, e Doutor em Direito Civil pela Univ. de París. Chamado por el rei D. João III da Univ. de Bordeaux (onde regentava uma cadeira de Humanidades) para a de Coimbra, então novamente reformada, ahi começou a ler em 1548 a segunda classe de latim e grego. Foi depois nomeado Reitor do collegio das Artes, que em 1555 por ordem do mesmo rei teve de entregar aos jesuitas. (V. a Deducção Chron. e Anal., parte I, pag. 25 e 26 da edição de 8.º) Sendo depois movido em um canonicato na se de Miranda, consta que ainda vivia em 1565, sem que haja sido possivel verificar a epocha certa do seu obito, nem tão pouco a do seu nascimento, que provavelmente teria logar nos principios do seculo XVI. Este insigne humanista dá honra á sua patria, e tem sido dignamente apreciado por naturaes e estranhos.' Barbosa Machado I, 720. «DIOGO DE TEYVE natural da Augusta Cidade de Braga, e hum dos mais celébres professores de letras humanas, que floresceu neste Reino. Para se instruir nas Ciências assim amenas, como severas passou à Corte de Paris onde pela natural viveza do engenho, e penetrante compreensão de juízo se adiantou com tal excesso a todos os seus condiscípulos, que recebido o grau de Doutor na Faculdade do Direito Cesáreo regeu uma Cadeira de Humanidades na Universidade de Bordeaux competindo na Ciência da língua Latina, afluência Poética, e facúndia Oratória com Jorge Buchanan, e Marco António Moreto, que no ano de 1526 eram respeitados como Oráculos destas faculdades que ensinavam na mesma Universidade. Querendo a Majestade delRey D. João o III Prover de Mestres a Universidade de Coimbra novamente por ele edificada o mandou convidar para tão nobre ministério com largo estipendio. Obedeceu prontamente à insinuação do seu Príncipe como se fora preceito, e acompanhado de André de Gouveia, e seu irmão Marçal de Gouveia, chegou a Coimbra no ano de 1547 onde foi provido na segunda Cadeira de Humanidades sendo Mestre da primeira Jorge Buchanan de nação Escocês. Tendo exercitado alguns anos o magistério com igual gloria do seu talento, como interesse da mocidade estudiosa subiu a ser Reitor do Colégio das Artes, onde era Mestre a tempo que ElRey D. João o III por carta escrita a 10. De Setembro de 1555 lhe ordenou entregasse o governo daquele Colégio aos Padres Jesuítas, o que executou no princípio do mês de Outubro. Para remunerar este Príncipe os seus grandes merecimentos lhe deu hum Canonicato na Catedral de Miranda, onde vivia pelos anos de 1565 aumentando a fama do seu nome com a excelência dos seus escritos. Foi insigne na língua Latina, ou fosse escrevendo em Oração solta, ou ligada merecendo aplausos a sua el. Seller Inventory # 1604NM024

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