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Vaucelle de Ravigny, Louis de.

Published by Egypt, 1826. (1826)

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About this Item: Egypt, 1826., 1826. 4to (235 x 185 mm). 177 pp. Contemporary wrappers (wanting spine). Ms. title and name on front cover. An early 19th century egyptologist's fascinating travel notes documenting his journey through the Nile valley, profusely illustrated with more than 230 sketches showing hieroglyphs and Greek and Coptic inscriptions. At the age of 27, Louis Vaucelle (1798-1851) undertook an expedition to Egypt to explore the banks of the Nile from Cairo to Aswan. He set out from Marseille on 27 January 1826 and reached the second cataract on 27 May. In his journal he accurately reproduces all cartouches and inscriptions of the temples, tombs and palaces visited up to the first cataract south of Aswan. He gives the condition of monuments (sometimes mere ruins), identifies traces of Christian chapels and churches, translates hieroglyphs dedicated both to pharaohs and Roman emperors, indicates (in cursive script) several Arabic words and names, and mentions the orientalists who preceded him: his mentor Champollion as well as Denon, Maillé, Belzoni, and Niebuhr. Among the temples and sites he describes are Ipsamboul, Edfu, Dakka ("un des mieux conservés"), Thèbes ("Louqsor"), Karnak, Denderah Assouan, Elephantine and Philae as well as the pyramids of Giza, Cleopatra's Needle, the Sphinx (the head of which is said to be "extrêmement mutilée"), Alexandria, and the Nile Delta. The final fifty-odd pages are devoted to contemporary Egyptian cities, their people, and their Arab, Jewish and Coptic traditions. As Vaucelle notes, Coptic Christians are free to practice their religion due to the unrivalled tolerance of the Muslim faith ("tant il est vrai qu’il n’y a pas de religion plus tolérante que la religion mahométane"). He also provides details of medical operations such as castration, circumcision, and excision, as well as of the "Kalisch" festivities held in Cairo at the time of the opening of the dikes. - Louis de Vaucelles de Ravigny was trained by Jean-François Champollion, who in 1824 published his "Précis du système hiéroglyphique des anciens Égyptiens". Apart from the present travel journal he also produced a "Chronologie des monuments antiques de la Nubie" (1829), based on the interpretation of the royal legends contained in the hieroglyphic reliefs, a book in which he pays tribute to the German egyptologist François-Christian Gau. - Slight fraying to edges; wants wrappers' spine. A fine survival. Seller Inventory # 45624

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A Journal of a Voyage round the: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

COOK: FIRST VOYAGE] [MAGRA, James, attributed]

Published by Becket & De Hondt, London (1771)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: Becket & De Hondt, London, 1771. Quarto, with the 2 pp. dedication to Banks and Solander; half brown morocco, marbled sides and endpapers. First edition of the earliest published account of Cook's first voyage to the Pacific: the rare first issue, with the leaf of dedication to 'The Right Honourable Lords of the Admiralty, and to Mr. Banks and Dr. Solander' inserted by the publisher to add authenticity, although it didn't succeed in winning either gentleman's favour. This was the first of a series of so-called "surreptitious accounts" of Cook's various voyages to appear in print: the Admiralty found it practically impossible to enforce their ruling that no unofficial publications should pre-empt the official and lengthier accounts of the voyages, naturally much slower in the press. In this case, however, legal action was taken against the publisher for using an unauthorised dedication, forcing removal of the leaf during publication. 'It is accordingly of the greatest rarity, and copies of the book containing the dedication are far more valuable than those without it?' (Davidson).Published anonymously some two months after their return, and nearly two years before Hawkesworth's official account, the American sailor James Magra (now more commonly "Matra") is the most likely author (Beaglehole, Journals, I, pp. cclvi-cclxiv). If Magra was indeed the author, his illicit sale of his journal to the publishers might well have confirmed Cook's opinion of him: 'one of those gentlemen, frequently found on board Kings Ships, that can very well be spared, or to speake more planer good for nothing?'. He was a New Yorker and a loyalist.Whatever his skipper and the authorities may have thought of him, it was Magra who got the first description of the voyage into print -- the earliest printed account of the east coast of Australia, published even before acceptance of the name Botany Bay, here called Sting-ray Bay as Cook originally christened it.The publication of the book has a further claim on our attention for, as Alan Frost has argued, Magra used his experiences on the east coast of Australia to draft his 1783 proposal for a penal colony at Botany Bay (never shy in self-promotion, Magra even announced his hope of being made Governor). His plan, like Sir Joseph Banks' before and George Young's after him, was shelved, but does appear to have been in the back of the minds of the planners of the First Fleet. Magra was even called as an expert witness to the committee in charge of solving the question of transportation (Alan Frost, James Mario Matra, pp. 113-122). Provenance: This copy has an interesting provenance. An early owner has left pencil and ink notes throughout, while the title-page has the stamp of the "Northern Protector of Aboriginals"; it is likely therefore that this copy belonged to the influential ethnographer and notable collector who held that office, Walter E. Roth. His administration of the post from 1898 to 1906 was marked for its sympathetic advocacy of Aboriginal rights. In this context the pencil notes which remark on various aspects of native behaviours, including New Zealand cannibalism, are especially interesting. An excellent copy in an old binding. Seller Inventory # 4504706

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Morse, Edward George.

Published by Mostly at sea, on board the barque "Sarah" of London, April 1831-14 March 1833 (with additions to 1835). (1835)

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About this Item: Mostly at sea, on board the barque "Sarah" of London, April 1831-14 March 1833 (with additions to 1835)., 1835. 4to (195 x 165 mm). (191) ff., including paste-downs and about 55 blanks. The journal with an engraved view as frontispiece, 15 full-page, 1 nearly full-page and 1 smaller manuscript maps and coastal profiles, plus a small engraved view mounted on 1 page. The lecture notes with a matching pair of engravings of a scull on and facing the title-page, and 27 pencil and/or ink anatomical drawings (including 2 full-page), some also with red. - Including: [Anatomical manuscript]. Morse, Edward George. Lecture Book [notes on anatomical lectures by Joseph Constantine Carpue]. [London], November-December 1828. Contemp, sheepskin parchment. A manuscript ship's journal kept by Edward George Morse (Bromyard 1805?-Deal post 1850?), who no doubt served, among other functions, as the ship's surgeon. Morse reflects on Arabian navigation and Arabian explorers, including the deservedly famous Ibn Battuta. "The Arabians like the Chinese are said to have employed the compass to guide them through the trackless sands of the desert or to enable them at the hours of prayer to direct their faces with precision towards the city of Mecca and tomb of the prophet. In the sixteenth century moreover when the Portuguese first visited the Indian seas they found that the Arabians are the chief navigators of those seas [.]". - Morse made his earliest dated entries in April 1831 at the island Mauritius in the Indian Ocean and others at Madagascar and its surrounding islands from May to August 1831. Those around Madagascar indicate he was on the barque Manchester, but from at least 11 December 1831 to his arrival back in England on 14 March 1833 he was on the barque Sarah, a 600 ton ship sailing out of London. In it he spent a year in the Seychelles 11 December 1831-15 December 1832, including Make Island, Bird Island, Praslin Island and La Digue. - In very good condition. The binding is soiled and rubbed, and the boards slightly warped, but it remains structurally sound. A fascinating and unusual ship's journal with numerous maps, kept in the unused leaves of the author's illustrated anatomical lecture notes of a few years earlier. Seller Inventory # 32457

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A Journal of a Voyage round the: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

About this Item: Becket and De Hondt, London, 1771. Quarto, complete with the rare dedication leaf; trimmed to a square octavo size, with pages cut close to the text; an unusual copy but in fact most attractive, bound in contemporary polished half calf over sprinkled paper boards, with the gilt cipher of George III to both boards; quarter calf box. First edition of the earliest published account of Cook's first voyage to the Pacific: the rare first issue, with the leaf of dedication to 'The Right Honourable Lords of the Admiralty, and to Mr. Banks and Dr. Solander' inserted by the publisher to add authenticity. The binding is unusual in that the binder has taken advantage of the small text block to trim the book to a small square-octavo scale, while the covers have the royal cipher of King George III in gilt.This was the first of a series of so-called "surreptitious accounts" of Cook's various voyages to appear in print: the Admiralty found it practically impossible to enforce their ruling that no unofficial publications should pre-empt the official and lengthier accounts of the voyages, naturally much slower in the press. In this case, however, legal action was taken against the publisher for using an unauthorised dedication, forcing removal of the leaf during publication. 'It is accordingly of the greatest rarity, and copies of the book containing the dedication are far more valuable than those without it?' (Davidson). Published anonymously some two months after the return of Endeavour and nearly two years before Hawkesworth's official account, its author remained unknown, though the great Cook scholar Beaglehole demonstrated that the American sailor James Magra is the likeliest candidate. If Magra was indeed the author, his illicit sale of his journal to the publishers might well have confirmed Cook's opinion of him: 'one of those gentlemen, frequently found on board Kings Ships, that can very well be spared, or to speake more planer good for nothing?'. He was a New Yorker and a loyalist.Whatever his skipper and the authorities may have thought of him, it was Magra who got the first description of the voyage into print - and incidentally the earliest printed account of the east coast of Australia, published even before acceptance of the name Botany Bay, here called Sting-ray Bay as Cook originally christened it. Provenance: This intriguing copy has a remarkable provenance, with the arms of George III on both boards, but apparently released as a duplicate; later in the Victorian-era collection of Thomas Harman Brenchley (armorial bookplate); more recently Commander Ingleton (who noted that the boards have the "royal cipher of King George III on both sides in gilt"). Seller Inventory # 4503929

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Nachricht von den Neuesten Entdeckungen der Engländer: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

About this Item: Haude & Spener, Berlin, 1772. Small octavo, xvi, 232 pp.; single woodcut illustration (p.215); early nineteenth century speckled paper boards with original label, bookplates to front pastedown endpaper. The extremely scarce first German account of Cook's first voyage, translated from Magra's surreptitious English original with an additional postscript that is almost certainly the work of George or Johann Forster. This book is remarkable for a number of reasons: the evidently unique postscript includes a woodblock illustration of a Maori ornament, the first known depiction of a Polynesian artefact in a printed book (also the first such image from Cook's voyage to Australia and New Zealand). Furthermore, the lengthy postscript -- unique to this publication -- describes preparations for Cook's second voyage, with details of Banks' ambitious plans for the voyage, discussions of New Holland and the question of longitude, and other matters of then pressing importance. Curiously, it also contains the first scientific description of the kangaroo, based on the specimen that returned on the Endeavour, and notes prepared by Daniel Solander.The original London printing of Magra's anonymously published account of Cook's first voyage, on which this German edition is based, was first published in London in 1771. It was the earliest printed book on the voyage, predating the official narrative by more than two years, and thus the first publication of Cook's discovery and charting of the east coast of Australia and the end of the search for a "Southern Continent". Given its methodical detail and distinctive prose style, the postscript is widely assumed to have been contributed by Georg Forster or his father Johann. Rolf Du Rietz states 'the anonymous author was probably Georg Forster, one of Spener's correspondents' (Kroepelien catalogue 217). However, the text is just as likely to be the work of his father Johann (note, for instance, the reference to translating Bougainville, a task completed by both Forsters around this time). The postscript is dated 24 Hornung (i.e. February) 1772, and thus dates from the period during which Cook's second voyage was being planned. This was when Joseph Banks still fully intended to sail, and when the Forsters were regular visitors at Soho Square. Indeed, Johann had made it very clear that he was eager to join them on any second voyage. Ultimately he would be Banks' replacement.Forster's contribution provides an intriguing glimpse of Banks' aspirations, including a detailed commentary on his planned retinue at a time when people such as artist Johann Zoffany and Dr. James Lind were still planning to sail. It is full of interesting asides, such as a commentary on the natural history painting of Sydney Parkinson, the plans to take Harrison's chronometers aboard (with a discussion of their mechanism), Anson's discovery of the breadfruit tree on Tinian, and the properties of New Zealand flax. There is also much of note regarding Australia. A plan to take on board the parts for two small schooners so that they may be reassembled in New Holland is particularly interesting, as is the assertion that one of the planned outcomes of the voyage is to ascertain whether a strait exists between New Holland and Van Diemen's Land (Furneaux, of course, was later criticised for not settling this question). Perhaps most interesting of all is Forster's lengthy scientific description of the kangaroo: evidently based on Solander's work, this must be the first scientific notice of the kangaroo ever published.Another fascinating and unexplored aspect of this edition is the woodcut illustrating a Maori ear ornament (p. 215), an integral part of the Forster postscript. The ornament illustrated is a greenstone ear-ring or pounamu kuru, and is the first published depiction of a Polynesian ethnographic artefact. It is also the first printed depiction of any object brought back to England from James Cook's first voyage. It is likely that Forster handled the kuru when vi. Seller Inventory # 4504214

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A Journal of Captain Cook's last voyage: Ledyard, John

Ledyard, John

Published by Nathaniel Patten, Hartford (1783)

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From: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Nathaniel Patten, Hartford, 1783. First edition. First edition. Lacking the map as usual. 208 pp. 8vo. THE FIRST AMERICAN BOOK ON HAWAII. Rare. "This is not only the first American book on the Northwest Coast, but also the first American book on Hawaii" (Streeter). Ledyard is distinguished in many respects, he was the only American to sail on Cook's third voyage which explored Alaska and discovered Hawaii. He was also in the boat that carried Cook ashore on the morning of his death. Indeed this work contains a detailed account of Cook's death "distinguished by its evident authority" (Hill).The purpose of Cook's third voyage was twofold. Ostensibly, it was to return Omai to his homeland in French Polynesia, but the main purpose was to search for the Northwest Passage. The Resolution and Discovery departed Plymouth in 1776 and made their way via the Cape to New Zealand and Tahiti. It was from there that Cook discovered Hawaii, which he regarded as his greatest achievement. The boats then proceeded to the Pacific Northwest and commenced their search for a route to the Atlantic. They returned to Hawaii for the winter of 1778-9. Their initial warm welcome soon wore off and tensions between the Hawaiians and the British resulted in Cook being killed on the shore of Kealakekua Bay on February 14, 1779. Charles Clerke assumed command of the expedition and proceeded north once again to pursue the voyage's objective. The two ships returned to England in 1780.A Connecticut native, after the voyage, Ledyard remained in England until 1782 when he was posted to the North American station - the Revolutionary War was ongoing. He promptly deserted and returned to Hartford where this account was published. This work preceded Rickman's by a matter of months, though in fact Ledyard made "liberal use of [the first English edition of] Rickman's account in his own narrative" (Hill). This is not to deride Ledyard unnecessarily, in addition to his account of Cook's death, his keen observations on the fur trade in the Pacific northwest are of great value.Ledyard's account is one of the rarest works on Cook's third's voyage and Hill confirms that "[o]nly a few copies still have the map." It was wanting in both the Streeter and Brooke-Hitching copies. This copy is further distinguished in being presented by Isaiah Thomas, eminent printer and founder of the American Antiquarian Society. He performed the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence and as a printer was responsible for the Massachusetts Spy (which supported Washington), the Royal American Magazine and the New England Almanac. His 1810 work History of Printing in America remains a benchmark in scholarship on the trade. Beddie, 1603; Evans 17998; Sabin 39691; Forbes 52; Hill 991; Howes L-181 "d"; Lada-Mocarski 36; Smith 5797; Streeter, Sale VI:3477 Contemporary sheep, extremities rubbed, boards a little scuffed, some minor dampstaining to the first few leaves, some light toning throughout. An unsophisticated copy and typical of American books of the era. In a custom green morocco-backed slipcase and chemise Lacking the map as usual. 208 pp. 8vo. Seller Inventory # 301431

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A Journal of a Voyage to the: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

COOK: FIRST VOYAGE] PARKINSON, Sydney

Published by Printed for Stanfield Parkinson, the Editor, London (1773)

Used Softcover First Edition

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About this Item: Printed for Stanfield Parkinson, the Editor, London, 1773. Large quarto, with frontispiece portrait, a map and 26 plates; completely uncut and partly unopened; an exceptionally large copy in its original binding of blue-grey paper boards, plain paper spine carefully renewed; in a folding cloth case. A really exceptional copy of the first edition of the most handsome of the unofficial accounts of Cook's first voyage. Copies of the first edition of Parkinson are invariably quite large with generous margins (and are often misleadingly catalogued as "Large paper" - in fact there were no "small paper" copies, only copies cut down by the binder), but the book is virtually never seen as here, completely uncut in its simple original binding. The spine has been replaced with appropriate plain paper. For the record, this copy measures 380 x 95 mm (binding) and 362 x 292 mm (bookblock).Parkinson, the son of a Quaker brewer of Edinburgh, was apprenticed to a draper when his ability for drawing 'flowers, fruits and other objects of natural history' first attracted the attention of Sir Joseph Banks. Banks engaged him as botanical artist on Cook's first voyage, and he went on to produce an important series of magnificent botanical and natural history drawings, and was the first professional artist to set foot on Australian soil. He died at the end of the voyage, en route from Batavia to the Cape of Good Hope.Parkinson was responsible for the original drawings for twenty-three of the twenty-seven plates here. His original artwork and these splendid engravings made from it represent one of the chief visual sources for Cook's first voyage, and one of the first views European observers had of such South Pacific scenes. Parkinson's journal of the voyage is plain and unaffected, and in the words of its editor 'its only ornament is truth, and its best recommendation characteristic of himself, its genuine simplicity'. Curiously, as the botanical drawings were retained by Banks, none of his botanical drawings appear in his own account, and not until recent years has the world at large learned of Parkinson's genius as a botanical artist.The book contains extensive accounts of New Zealand and Australia, and has some of the earliest natural history observations on the region. Parkinson's image of the natives of New Holland, as well as his depiction of the kangaroo, form fine engravings in this publication. His journal also has some of the earliest natural history observations on the region, and in fact contains the first published use of the word kangaroo (as "kangooroo", p. 149). When Parkinson drew the kangaroo he noted that 'In gathering plants today I myself had the good fortune to see the beast so much talked of, tho but imperfectly; he was not only like a grey hound in size and running but had a long tail? what to liken him to I could not tell?' (Endeavour River, 27 June, 1770). Six weeks later, on 4 August while still at Endeavour River, Cook recorded that '?the Animal which I have before mentioned is called by the natives Kangooroo or Kanguru'.At the end of the voyage, en route from Batavia to the Cape of Good Hope, Parkinson died of a fever, still only a young man in his mid-twenties (his exact birth-date is not known). When the expedition returned to England his manuscripts and drawings became a matter of dispute. Banks, as his employer, considered that they were his, while Parkinson's brother Stanfield claimed them under the provisions of his brother's will. When Hawkesworth learned of the impending publication of this work, he got an injunction to delay its appearance until some time after his official account of the first voyage. He further retaliated by deliberately omitting Parkinson's name from the narrative and even the botanical illustrations in the official account of Cook's first voyage to the Pacific give no credit to the artist. Provenance: Early continental bookseller's label on front board; Private collection (Sydney). Light offsetting from the plates as usual; corner torn from one leaf. Seller Inventory # 4504475

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A New Voyage, Round the World, In: COOK, Captain James

COOK, Captain James [1728-1779]) - John HAWKESWORTH (1715-1773)

Published by printed by James Rivington, New York (1774)

Used 2 volumes, octavo First Edition

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About this Item: printed by James Rivington, New York, 1774. 2 volumes, octavo. (7 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches). [2],17,4,[2],260; [2],250pp. 2 folding engraved frontispieces (one engraved by Paul Revere), 1 folding world map engraved by Bernard Romans. Contemporary speckled calf, rebacked, gilt leather label Rare first American edition of Cook's First Voyage, with a plate engraved by Paul Revere and the first world map to be published in America. The first American edition of any of Cook's voyages, issued in New York on the eve of the American Revolution by the Loyalist printer, James Rivington. The work contains one of Paul Revere's more exotic copper plate engravings and the first world map printed in the Americas. Hawkesworth's account of Capt. James Cook's first voyage to the Pacific first appeared in 1773. One of the most important publications in all of the literature of exploration and voyages, it describes Cook's important explorations of Australia, discovery of New Zealand, adventures on Tahiti, and a wealth of other material. The tremendous interest in the voyage is reflected in this American edition, only the second work devoted to Pacific exploration to be published in an American edition. "The frontispiece by Paul Revere and the Romans map make this a distinguished book" (Streeter). The publisher, Rivington, later famous as the New York Loyalist printer of the Revolution, made every effort to make this product of the British colonial press as elegant as possible. The folding frontispiece to the first volume is by the Revolutionary hero, silversmith and engraver, Paul Revere. It is a version of plate 7 by F. Bartolozzi that is usually found facing p.265 in vol.II of the first English edition. According to Clarence Brigham, Revere worked from a reduced reversed version of this plate published in The Town and Country Magazine (June, 1773, vol.V, p.313), a copy of which was sent to him by the publisher Rivington (via Henry Knox of Boston) in April 1774. Rivington asked that Revere engrave the image "with all the ability in his power and let it be done as soon as possible" (letter to Knox, dated 8 April 1774). The final result (about fifty per cent smaller than Bartolozzi's original) amply demonstrates the charming naïveté that is such a hallmark of Paul Revere's work. Revere's day book shows that he charged £4-0-0 for the plate (see 3 May 1774 entry). Importantly, the plate is the first visual image of the South Seas to be printed in America. The folding frontispiece to the second volume is unsigned, but is a composite of two images that both originate with drawings by Sydney Parkinson, the official draughtsman/artist on the voyage. The image is divided in two vertically: the left side of the plate is of a New Zealander. The original of this image was eventually engraved by T. Charles and published in Parkinson's A Journal of a Voyage (London: 1784) facing p.88. The right side is of two Australian aboriginals. The original of this image was also engraved by T. Charles and in Parkinson's work opposite p.134. The untitled map is the first map of the world to be published in the Americas. A Mercator projection designed to show the track of Cook's voyage, it also shows the course charted by Bougainville as well. It was designed and engraved by the famous American mapmaker, Bernard Romans, best known for his work as a naturalist and cartographer in Florida, as well as his sailing directions of the East Coast and an engraved map of Connecticut. A rare American cartographic landmark, found as originally published in the first American edition of any of Cook's voyages, itself a significant issue of the late British colonial press. Beddie 656; Brigham Paul Revere's Engravings pp 102-105; L. Diamant Bernard Romans pp.29-30; Evans 13324; Holmes 9; Sabin 30936; Streeter Sale 2407; Wheat & Brun Maps and Charts Published in America before 1800 1. Seller Inventory # 28258

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About this Item: Paris Chez Estienne Robinot, 1713. A Superb Copy in a Contemporary Binding, with the Folding Map of Louisiana in Fine Condition JOUTEL, [Henri]. Journal historique du dernier voyage que feu M. de la Sale fit dans le Golfe de Mexique, pour trouver l’embouchure, & le cours de la Riviere de Missicipi, nommée à present la Riviere de Saint Loüis, que traverse la Louisiane. Où l’on voit l’Histoire tragique de sa mort, & plusieurs choses curieuses du nouveau monde. Par Monsieur Joutel, l’un des Compagnons de ce Voyage, redigé & mis en ordre par Monsieur De Michel. Paris: Chez Estienne Robinot, 1713. First edition of this important account of La Salle’s ill-fated expedition. Twelvemo. xxxiv, 386 pp. Folding engraved map ("Carte Nouvelle de la Louisiane, et de la Riviere de Missisipi, découverte par feu Mr. de la Salle") after Joutel. Contemporary French sprinkled calf. Spine decoratively tooled in gilt with brown morocco gilt lettering label. Board edges decoratively tooled in gilt. Edges sprinkled red. Small wormtrack in the lower blank corner throughout. A few small stains. Early ink markings on pp. 360 and 361. Early ink stamp of the Pères Dominicains Poitiers on title and on verso of folding map. Booklabel on front pastedown. Two early ink signatures crossed out on front free endpaper. A spectacular copy of this extremely rare account, with the folding map fine, fresh, and untouched. In 1684 La Salle received royal approval for his plans to establish a French colony in newly named Louisiana, at the mouth of the Mississippi. Unfortunately, his ship from France went off course and he landed in present Texas. A colony was established but eventually failed, and La Salle was assassinated by his own men. Henri Joutel survived and his account is the best description available of La Salle’s last expedition to Louisiana and Texas. "The map which accompanies the work was designed by Joutel, and is the first to give the results of the last two voyages of La Salle. It gives a very correct representation of the course of the Mississippi as far as its mouth" (Church). The map includes portions of the area from the Gulf of Mexico to the headwaters of the Mississippi, also showing a view of Niagara Falls. Church 855. Graff 2251. Harrisse 750. Howes J266. Phillips, Maps of America, p. 367. Wagner, Spanish Southwest, 79. HBS 65301. $22,500. Seller Inventory # 65301

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Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, in 1772,: MARRA, John]

About this Item: London, 1775. Octavo. (8 1/4 x 4 7/8 inches). 1 folding engraved map, 5 engraved plates, extra-illustrated with 1 folding engraved map "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774" Contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments with raised bands, morocco lettering-piece "The first printed account of man's entry into the region south of the Antarctic circle" (Spence) and the earliest published complete account of Cook's second voyage, issued at least eighteen months prior to the official version. "A rare work . contain[ing] details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item." (Davidson). The second voyage included the first crossing of the Antarctic circle, making Marra's narrative the earliest firsthand account of the Antarctic, and the engraved plates are the first depictions of that region. Due to the strict regulations against private publications, the work was published anonymously, but the identity of the author did not remain a mystery for long. "Correspondence between Cook and the Admiralty shows that the author was John Marra, one of the gunners' mates in the Resolution. He was an Irishman whom Cook had picked up at Batavia during the first voyage. He made an abortive attempt to desert at Tahiti on 14 May 1774, an escapade of which Cook took so lenient a view that he says - 'I know not if he might have obtained my consent, if he had applied for it in proper time.' This did not, however, as Marra states at p. 241, prevent his being put in irons." (Holmes). This copy contains the extremely rare extra folded map, "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774," which is noted by Beddie and Rosove, but which is not called for in most of the references. This map has been present in only three of the twenty-five copies of the first edition sold at auction in the last thirty or so years. The chart appears opposite the first page of text and shows New Caledonia and the Great Cyclades islands to the north and Norfolk island to the south. It is a most interesting production, and is to be found in two states: first, as here with the engraver's name and with the position of Norfolk Island incorrectly placed 4° too far south; and second, with the engraver's name erased (but just visible), with Norfolk Island's latitude corrected. The chart follows two of the Gilbert manuscript charts (see David 2.225/6/) in spelling Ballabeah Isle with a final "h," unlike all the other manuscript charts. We have a definite date for the corrected issue of this chart, as it accompanied the article, "Late Voyages of the Resolution and Adventure," published in the Gentleman's Magazine , Vol. XLVI, 1776 (edited by David Henry), opposite page 120 in the March issue. Therefore, it seems probable that the uncorrected chart found its way into copies of Marra issued during the last two or three months of 1775. Bagnall 630; Beaglehole II, pp.cliii-clv; Beddie 1270; Conrad p.13; Davidson p.60; Hill (2004) 1087; Hocken, p.14; Holmes 16; Kroepelien 809; O'Reilly-Reitman 379; Rosove 214.A1b; Sabin 16247; Spence 758; Streeter Sale 2408. Seller Inventory # 19445

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Journal of a Voyage to New South: WHITE, John

WHITE, John

Published by J. Debrett, London (1790)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: J. Debrett, London, 1790. Quarto, engraved title and 65 handcoloured plates; bound with the list of subscribers, early owner's inscription on first page of text; a remarkably large copy with wide margins, completely uncut; in a good modern calf binding. A superb and very large untrimmed copy of the rare coloured issue. This is the deluxe issue of the first edition of this famous First Fleet book in which the plates were coloured by hand. Especially in this form, White's Journal is one of the most beautiful of Australian colour-plate books, and one of the most attractive, as well as one of the earliest, Australian bird books. The book was an immediate success on publication, with subscribers alone accounting for seven hundred copies. It is a travel and ornithological classic by a medical voyager: John White was chief surgeon of the First Fleet, and was particularly successful in that he overcame serious medical problems in appalling conditions both on the voyage out and when the settlement was founded. He was also a keen amateur naturalist and after arriving at Port Jackson found time to accompany Phillip on two journeys of exploration. On joining the First Fleet he had begun to keep a journal in which he made notes about birds in the new colony. It was this manuscript which formed the nucleus of his journal.The natural history content makes White's particularly noteworthy amongst the First Fleet journals. Many of the plates were drawn in England by leading natural history artists of the day, such as Sarah Stone and Frederick Nodder, from original sketches done in the colony. White's interest in natural history continued until he left New South Wales in December 1794. When the convict artist Thomas Watling arrived in the colony in October 1792 he was assigned to White and in the next two years made many drawings of birds for him. It is possible that White himself had some skill as an artist and that he was responsible for the original sketches of some of the engravings here.White's journal also contains a good description of the voyage from London, with long, detailed accounts of the stops at Rio de Janeiro, Cape Town and of the colonial voyages to Norfolk Island.As Wantrup points out in a lengthy discussion in Australian Rare Books, the number of "points" that have interested collectors in the past are really rather pointless now that many copies have been properly described. However in the interest of completeness, we note that this copy: 1) has the standard form of the List of Plates; 2) has the List of Subscribers, which is not always present; 3) has the draughtsmen's names somewhat faintly printed (as we know to be normal) but certainly not deteriorated; and 4) has the earlier uncancelled state of the Wattled Merops text on p.240, no longer thought to be the great rarity that it once was. This copy does not contain 4 pp. advertisements sometimes found but by no means present in all copies. Provenance: Caroline Grevis (1774-1818), inscription on first page of text dated 30 December 1815; Alan Wambeek, modern bookplate. The uncut edges just a little dusted, otherwise absolutely fine. Seller Inventory # 4504411

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Journal of the Last Voyage Perform'd by: JOUTEL, HENRI

JOUTEL, HENRI

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Joseph J. Felcone Inc., ABAA (Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: 1714. JOUTEL, HENRI. A Journal of the Last Voyage Perform'd by Monsr. de la Sale, to the Gulph of Mexico, to Find Out the Mouth of the Missisipi River. London: For A. Bell, B. Lintott, and J. Baker, 1714. 8vo. [2], xxi, [9], 191, 194-205, [5] p. Engraved folding map (short closed tear). Contemporary calf. Extremities rubbed, top of spine a bit worn, else a lovely untouched copy, the text clean and fresh and entirely unfoxed. Peter A. Porter bookplate and Wolfgang Herz label. First edition in English; originally published in Paris the previous year. The map is entitled "A New Map of the Country of Louisiana and of Ye River Missisipi in North America." and depicts the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana, parts of Texas, and the eastern coast of America. In the upper corner is a lovely vignette of Niagara Falls. Joutel's journal is one of the best accounts of La Salle's ill-fated expedition to establish a settlement at the mouth of the Mississippi River and the short-lived colony in Texas which the party used for two years as a base for further exploration. La Salle was eventually assassinated by some of his own men, and Joutel and others succeeded in returning to Canada. European Americana 714/40; Church 859; Howes J-266(b); Wagner, Spanish Southwest, 79b; Streeter Sale 112. Seller Inventory # 13613

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A Journal of a Voyage to the: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

COOK: FIRST VOYAGE] PARKINSON, Sydney

Published by S. Parkinson, London (1773)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: S. Parkinson, London, 1773. Quarto, with frontispiece portrait, a map and 26 plates; a large and attractive copy, top edge gilt, others completely uncut, finely bound in full speckled tan calf. First edition: a large, uncut copy. This is the most handsome of the unofficial accounts of Cook's first voyage. Engaged by Joseph Banks as botanical artist on the Endeavour, Parkinson produced an enormous number of magnificent botanical and natural history drawings of Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia. At the end of the voyage, en route from Batavia to the Cape of Good Hope, he died of a fever.His manuscripts and drawings became a matter of dispute: Banks considered that they were his, while Parkinson's brother Stanfield claimed them under the provisions of his brother's will. When Hawkesworth learned of the impending publication of this work, he got an injunction to delay its appearance until some time after his official account, and retaliated by deliberately omitting Parkinson's name from the narrative: even the botanical illustrations in the official account have no credit to the artist.Parkinson himself was responsible for the original drawings for twenty-three of the twenty-seven plates here. His original artwork and these engravings made from it are one of the chief visual sources for Cook's first voyage, and one of the first views European observers had of such South Pacific scenes. Parkinson's journal also has some of the earliest natural history observations on the region, and contains the first published use of the word kangaroo (as "kangooroo", p. 149). Provenance: William Charles De Mefun, Earl Fitzwilliam, with bookplate. A good copy with large margins. Seller Inventory # 4210131

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Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, in 1772,: MARRA, John]

About this Item: London, 1775. Octavo. 1 folding engraved map, 5 engraved plates, extra-illustrated with 1 folding engraved map "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774" Light dampstaining to a few leaves, some minor foxing. Modern paneled calf, gilt leather label "The first printed account of man's entry into the region south of the Antarctic circle" (Spence) and the earliest published complete account of Cook's second voyage, issued at least eighteen months prior to the official version. "A rare work . contain[ing] details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item." (Davidson). The second voyage included the first crossing of the Antarctic circle, making Marra's narrative the earliest firsthand account of the Antarctic, and the engraved plates are the first depictions of that region. Due to the strict regulations against private publications, the work was published anonymously, but the identity of the author did not remain a mystery for long. "Correspondence between Cook and the Admiralty shows that the author was John Marra, one of the gunners' mates in the Resolution. He was an Irishman whom Cook had picked up at Batavia during the first voyage. He made an abortive attempt to desert at Tahiti on 14 May 1774, an escapade of which Cook took so lenient a view that he says - 'I know not if he might have obtained my consent, if he had applied for it in proper time.' This did not, however, as Marra states at p. 241, prevent his being put in irons." (Holmes). This copy contains the extremely rare extra folded map, "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774," which is noted by Beddie and Rosove, but which is not called for in most of the references. This map has been present in only three of the twenty-five copies of the first edition sold at auction in the last thirty or so years. The chart appears opposite the first page of text and shows New Caledonia and the Great Cyclades islands to the north and Norfolk island to the south. It is a most interesting production, and is to be found in two states: first, as here with the engraver's name and with the position of Norfolk Island incorrectly placed 4° too far south; and second, with the engraver's name erased (but just visible), with Norfolk Island's latitude corrected. The chart follows two of the Gilbert manuscript charts (see David 2.225/6/) in spelling Ballabeah Isle with a final "h," unlike all the other manuscript charts. We have a definite date for the corrected issue of this chart, as it accompanied the article, "Late Voyages of the Resolution and Adventure," published in the Gentleman's Magazine , Vol. XLVI, 1776 (edited by David Henry), opposite page 120 in the March issue. Therefore, it seems probable that the uncorrected chart found its way into copies of Marra issued during the last two or three months of 1775. Bagnall 630; Beaglehole II, pp.cliii-clv; Beddie 1270; Conrad p.13; Davidson p.60; Hill (2004) 1087; Hocken, p.14; Holmes 16; Kroepelien 809; O'Reilly-Reitman 379; Rosove 214.A1b; Sabin 16247; Spence 758; Streeter Sale 2408. Seller Inventory # 28616

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A Journal of the Voyages and Travels: GASS, Patrick (1771-1870)
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About this Item: Printed by Zadok Cramer, for David M'Keehan, Publisher and Proprietor, Pittsburgh, 1807. 12mo. (6 1/2 x 4 inches). 262pp. Contemporary tree sheep, flat spine divided into compartments with blind rules, lettering in gilt in the second Provenance: John Statesir (inscription dated 1823) A rare unsophisticated copy in the original binding of the first edition of the earliest published firsthand account of the Lewis and Clark expedition: "one of the essential books for an Americana collection" (Streeter). The origins of Gass's journal is explained in a 7 April 1805 letter from Meriwether Lewis to President Thomas Jefferson: "We have encouraged our men to keep journals, and seven of them do so, to whom in this respect we give every assistance in our power." Because of the delay in the publication of the official account, Gass' journal became the first to appear in print, and as such was eagerly taken up by readers starved for information about the discoveries. "Patrick Gass was a rough reliable frontier soldier when he joined the Lewis and Clark expedition. He was made a sergeant when Sergeant Floyd died. He writes a terse soldier's narrative with rugged honesty. For seven years his story offered the only real information the nation had of the Oregon country and of the Louisiana Purchase. It is a work of primary importance" (Webster A. Jones). First editions of Gass's journal have become scarce, particularly in good condition. Besides being unsophisticated and in its original binding, this copy is also particularly tall, with most extant copies trimmed down considerably. Graff 1516; Hill (2004) 685; Howes G77 'b'; Literature of the Lewis & Clark Expedition 3.1; Sabin 26741; Shaw & Shoemaker 12646; Smith 3465; Streeter Sale 3120; Wagner-Camp 6:1. Seller Inventory # 35013

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A Journal of a Voyage to the: PARKINSON, Sydney (1745?-1771)

PARKINSON, Sydney (1745?-1771)

Published by Printed for Stanfield Parkinson, London (1773)

Used Quarto

Quantity Available: 1

From: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA) (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: Printed for Stanfield Parkinson, London, 1773. Quarto. (12 5/8 x 10 5/8 inches). xxiii,212,[2]pp. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Parkinson by James Newton, 26 engraved plates (1 plate after Alexander Buchan, 2 plates after S.H. Grimm and 24 after Parkinson). Contemporary marbled boards with vellum corners, rebacked in calf, retaining original red morocco lettering piece Large-paper copy of Parkinson's important illustrated account of Cook's first voyage: "Parkinson was engaged by Sir Joseph Banks to accompany him and Captain Cook in the Endeavour to the South Seas, as natural history draughtsman . After exploring Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia, and the Great Barrier Reef, the expedition reached Batavia. On leaving for the Cape of Good Hope, Parkinson succumbed to fever and dysentery and was buried at sea. Banks spoke highly of his 'unbounded industry' in making for him a much larger collection of drawings than he had anticipated. His observations, too, were valuable, and the vocabularies of South Sea languages given in his journals are of great interest. Upon Banks' return to England, Stanfield Parkinson, Sydney's brother, claimed all the drawings made by his brother in his spare hours, as well as journals and collections, under a will made before Sydney Parkinson left England. Following the dispute, his writings were lent to Stanfield Parkinson, who transcribed them and prepared them for publication, but an injunction was obtained . to restrain him from publishing until after the appearance of . Hawkesworth's official account" (Hill). Parkinson's drawings stand as one of the chief visual sources for the voyage: he produced a large number of magnificent botanical, natural history and ethnographical drawings of Tierra del Fuego, Tahiti, New Zealand, and Australia. At the time, these drawings offered Europe its first view of life in the South Pacific. The work contains extensive descriptions of Australia and New Zealand, and is the first work to properly identify the kangaroo by name. A major journal for Cook's first voyage. Beddie 712; Hill 1308; Holmes 7; Sabin 58787; Davidson, A Book Collector's Notes, pp. 54-6; NMM I:564; O'Reilly & Reitman 371; Kroepelien 944; Cox I, p.58. Seller Inventory # 28619

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Journal of the Resolution's voyage, in 1772,: MARRA, John].
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About this Item: London F. Newbery:, 1775. First edition. 8vo., xiii,[1],328pp., folding map, 5 engraved plates, contemporary sprinkled calf, gilt lettered "5" on spine, neat repairs to extremities, modern cloth box, red morocco label, an excellent copy. the first published account of Cook's second voyage and the first printed account of the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle. Appearing anonymously eighteen months before the official account, Marra's Journal records many incidents omitted by Cook and gives the reasons which caused Sir Joseph Bankand his twelve assistants to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Marra was a gunner's mate of Irish descent aboard the Resolution. He attempted to desert, unsuccessfully, at Tahiti, prompting Cook to remark later: "I know not if he might not have obtained my consent if he had applied for it in proper time." Marra himself recounts his punishment in irons. This edition was apparently intended to form vol.5 of A historical account of all the voyages round the world, performed by English navigators, volumes1-4 of which, by David Henry (who edited the present account), were published in 1773-74. Hence the number "5" on the spine. Hill 1087; Holmes 16; Rosove 214.A1; Sabin 16247. Seller Inventory # 90840

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Journal du voyage de Mr Collier resident: COLLIER (COLJER), Justin
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About this Item: l'Argus du livre de collection, 1992, p. 153; Barbier, Anon. et pseud. 9040; Ferweda I, p. 304; SUDOC 085070254. Second French edition of the journal of Justin(us) Collier (also Coljer or Colier) (ca. 1624-1682) giving a detailed account of his first months in Constantinople (Istanbul), Smyrna (Izmir) and Adrianople (Edirne) in 1668, the year he succeeded Levinus Warner (1618/19-1665) as Dutch ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. After the journal itself follow two letters to the Dutch States General, one from the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed IV (1642-1693) and one from the governor (Caïmacam or Kaymakam).With a few faint and mostly marginal stains, but otherwise in very good condition. Binding also very good. A detailed eye-witness account of the Ottoman Empire in 1668, by the Dutch ambassador there. Seller Inventory # F76CUO01U79O

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About this Item: 1813. Autograph(?) manuscript, written in a highly legible hand. 68pp incl. paper cover (65 written pages). Dated entries from 17 November 1812 to 27 February The Church Missionary Society was founded in 1799 and first entered West Africa in 1804. Various records show that Leopold Butscher was active as a missionary there from as early as 1806, and was invited to England in the spring of 1812, to give a report on his work. While there he married Miss Catharine Wilson: the author of the journal in question, which records their journey back to Africa, along with seven other members of the society. Mrs Butscher?s journal is a remarkable first person account of the voyage; describing the Brig. Charles? passage from Falmouth Harbour on 11 December 1812 to where it was wrecked some 20 miles south of the Gambia River on 5 January 1813. Although the voyage began precariously, as Capt. Graham insisted that the Charles leave Falmouth in the midst of a gale, they enjoyed largely clement weather until an incident on the night of the 5th. The journal captures the moment when the Charles hit a rock in full sail, with Mrs Butscher writing that the resultant noise ?will never I think be forgotten by me? She recorded the nervous days following the collision, detailing encounters with Mandingo-speaking natives and an attempt to free the ship from the rocks. With the Charles wrecked, the CMS members were taken to Goree on a native vessel, anchoring on the 16th. While the women stayed ashore to recuperate, Mr Butscher, along with other members of the crew, set out on the Brig. Neptune, to reclaim cargo from the wreck. Upon his return on the 27th Mrs Butscher made an eight-page transcription of her husband?s account of the journey: including vivid descriptions of Capt. Graham?s murder by the natives and an unsuccessful attempt to retake the Charles. The remaining entries can be broadly separated into two types. The first describe life on Goree and yield insight into the native cultures of West Africa. In one example Mrs Butscher fails to overcome the culture shock aggravated by a touring dance from the mainland (Senegal), made in celebration of killing a wolf. The second type of entry regards the Butschers? struggle to reclaim their possessions. Of these passages, those that tell the tale of Catharine?s piano are the most interesting, as it was held by the King of Combo, who ?daily amused himself ? by drawing a stick across the wires? When it was finally returned, it was ?fit for nothing but fire wood? The journal ends somewhat abruptly on 27 February 1813, with the Butschers putting their luggage aboard a Spanish bark, headed for their original destination: Rio Pongo. Although they arrived there safely, the Butschers, along with five other members of the original missionary group, would die of fever in Sierra Leone: Catharine on 19 May 1815 and Leopold on 17 July 1817. We cannot find anything to suggest that the journal was ever published. A number of letters from Leopold Butscher (a few of which were forwarded by Catherine) to various correspondents are present in the Church Missionary Society Archive at the University of Birmingham, UK. Seller Inventory # 221681

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About this Item: 1855. First English edition. Two volumes. Frontispiece portrait. 8vo. Original brown publisher's cloth, stamped in blind and gilt, light shelf wear, book society label on rear pastedown of first volume, light toning and soiling in text but a very good copy. vii, 391, [5]; [2], 403, [24]pp. London, Translated from the French edition of the previous year (both published posthumously). The journal of Joseph Bellot (1826-53), detailing his time with an expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, serving as second in command under Capt. William Kennedy on the Prince Albert. The expedition, which extended through 1851 and 1852, included a substantial overland sledging journey. Though they failed to find Franklin's lost ships, they did make significant discoveries in the Canadian Arctic, returning to England with the entirety of the crew safely intact. Bellot was not as lucky on his next Franklin search expedition the following year: he fell through the ice while crossing Wellington Channel and disappeared from sight. His crew mates erected a memorial grave on Beechey Island, next to three graves from the lost Franklin Expedition.Arctic Bibliography, 1305; Sabin, 4566. Seller Inventory # 224055

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Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, In 1772,: COOK: SECOND VOYAGE]

COOK: SECOND VOYAGE] [MARRA, John]

Published by F. Newbery, London (1775)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: F. Newbery, London, 1775. Condition: Very good. Octavo, folding frontispiece map and five plates, leaf D2 a cancel as usual; in later polished light tan calf. First edition: the first full account of Cook's second voyage to have been published, and the earliest account of any Antarctic exploration. This surreptitious narrative of the voyage preceded the official account by some eighteen months. Although published anonymously, it is known to have been the work of John Marra, a Cook regular who was also to be an Australian First Fleeter. As early as September 1775 Cook was aware of the authorship: he had asked the gunner Anderson whether he had written the journal, and Anderson had convinced Marra to come forward. Amazingly, Johann Forster, the controversial naturalist of the second voyage, assisted in getting the book ready for the press (see Kroepelien, 809).The second voyage marked the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle, and John Marra's book thus contains the earliest first-hand account of the Antarctic regions, while the engravings include the earliest Antarctic landscape. Thirty-eight pages of text deal with the Antarctic visit, and the main map shows the passage of Cook's two ships to the high southern latitudes. Marra (sometimes Mara), an Irish sailor who had first sailed with Cook on the last leg of the Endeavour voyage, joined the Resolution in Batavia. A recidivist would-be deserter under Cook, Marra would reappear in history as a First Fleeter, failing again in an attempt to desert when he went bush for three days in Port Jackson in 1789. He twice attempted to jump ship during the second voyage, the second time swimming desperately for shore as the Resolution left Tahiti. This latter unsuccessful attempt was only lightly punished by Cook, who mused in his journal that any man without 'friends or connections to confine him to any part of the world' could not 'spend his days better than at one of those isles where he can injoy all the necessaries and some of the luxuries of life in ease and Plenty.' (Beaglehole, Journals, II, p. 404). He did however go on to be a gunner's mate on HMS Sirius, flagship of the First Fleet.Although Marra was aboard the Resolution on the Cook voyage, he also gives an account of the voyage of the Adventure during the period when the two ships were separated, including mention of the time the Adventure spent on the Tasmanian coast. 'A rare work? it contains details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item?' (Davidson). Provenance: Private collection (Sydney). Seller Inventory # 4503923

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The Journal of a Voyage from Calcutta: PRINSEP, Mrs Augustus

PRINSEP, Mrs Augustus and Captain Thomas PRINSEP

Published by Smith & Elder, London (1833)

Used Softcover

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: Smith & Elder, London, 1833. Complete set in fine original condition, comprising: Text, duodecimo, folding map, very good in the original cloth with paper label to front, the label rather worn; and Views, two parts quarto, the fine India paper issue of the ten views, the eleventh plate the engraved plan of Hobart, folding plate a little creased at the folds, but generally very good indeed in the original illustrated titling-wrappers. Views housed in cloth folder. One of the scarcer Australian view-books and a famous Tasmanian rarity. This is a most attractive set, with the text in the original green cloth, and the accompanying plates in the finer India paper issue and retaining the original titling wrappers."Mr and Mrs Augustus Prinsep were members of a large English merchant family living in Calcutta. After an extended visit to Van Diemen's Land between 1829 and 1830 Augustus Prinsep died unexpectedly. Mrs Prinsep published a short account of their travels under the title The Journal of a Voyage from Calcutta to Van Diemen's Land in London in 1833 as a memorial of their last trip together. In a note at the end of that slim duodecimo volume she advised that a set of illustrations to the voyage would be published if there was any public interest. Clearly there was, since that same year a set of ten fine lithographs was issued in two parts, quarto, to accompany the text. The illustrations are after her own sketches and others made by Captain Thomas Prinsep, her brother-in-law. Seven of the plates are of Van Diemen's Land and three are of Penang and Angir" (Australian Rare Books). Seller Inventory # 3712432

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The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany: PHILLIP, Governor Arthur

About this Item: Stockdale, London, 1790. Quarto, portrait and engraved title, seven folding engraved charts and 46 engraved plates; some light offsetting from the plates as is to be expected; a splendid copy, with wide margins, in contemporary polished marbled calf, flat spine banded in gilt, red leather label. A beautiful copy of the very scarce well revised and re-organised second edition of the classic account of Australian first settlement. The publisher, Stockdale, had been unhappy with the slightly disorganised nature of his 1789 first edition of this official account; he discarded the first edition sheets within a few months, issuing this new version both in parts and in volume form (a single copy of the parts version is known today, in the Mitchell Library). A clever publisher, he neatly makes a virtue of both the new and the old editions: 'Nothing seems to be required', he writes, 'in sending out this second edition, but to give assurance, that the alterations made in it, are such only as, while they raise in some degree the value of the present publication, cannot materially depreciate the former'.This should properly be seen as the "best edition" of the work, at any rate in its uncoloured form. Apart from the re-arrangement and general improvement, Stockdale adds a really substantial and significant appendix, largely reprinting his own publication, the anonymous 1787 History of New Holland. It is accompanied by the fine "New Chart of New Holland", coloured in outline and with an inset map of Botany Bay, that he had prepared for that 1787 publication. The new sub-title for the Appendix reads 'Appendix Continued. The History of New Holland, from its first discovery in MDCXVI, to the present time. And a Discourse on Banishment, by the Right Honourable Lord Aukland [sic]. Illustrated with a chart of New Holland, and a plan of Botany Bay. MCCCXC'.This edition is very much scarcer than the first. It has its own List of Subscribers which is fairly modest, numerous booksellers making single-digit orders - apart from Symonds, presumably H.D. Symonds the radical and opportunistic operator, early publisher of Barrington, who orders a staggering 400 copies. This may well be an indication that the publication had largely been pre-sold to Symonds who, as Nathan Garvey points out (private correspondence), 'had lashed out for 12 copies of Hunter's Historical Journal in 1793? One contemporary reference to Symonds refers to his "extensive country trade" and alludes to wholesale dealings, which might help explain this?'. Garvey points out that Stockdale was issuing teasing advertisements for the second edition, and soliciting subscribers, from early August 1789 but by the time the second edition actually appeared in March of 1790 dedicated advertising for it quickly ceased suggesting that it had largely sold out. Within three months Stockdale was advertising an octavo, later "third", edition. Provenance: R.D. Steedman, Nescastle-upon-Tyne bookseller; R. David Parsons, with booklabel;private collection (Sydney). In lovely condition: a superb copy. Seller Inventory # 4504400

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Journal du Voyage de Siam fait en: CHOISY, François-Timoléon de,

CHOISY, François-Timoléon de, (L'Abbe de).

Published by Paris Sebastien Mabre-Cramoisy (1687)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Shapero Rare Books (London, United Kingdom)

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About this Item: Paris Sebastien Mabre-Cramoisy, 1687. First edition. 4to., [iv], 416 pp., Title with woodcut vignette; some occasional browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, sides with the gilt arms, spine in six compartments, gilt-lettered red morocco lettering-piece in one, others gilt, neat repairs to extremities, a very handsome example. Rare first edition account of the journal of the Chaumont embassy (1685-1686) sent by Louis XIV to Siam. Choisy was a missionary sent to try to convert King Narai. This mission failed, but Choisy's book, compiled from the experiences of Abbe de Choisy, Father Guy Tachard and the Chevalier de Chaumont, was of great interest and was republished as recently as 1930. Narai was king of Siam from 1656-88, and his credited with producing the first 'golden age' of Thai literature. Encouraged by his foreign minister Constantine Phaulkon the famed Greek adventurer who became a prominent figure in Narai's court, Narai hoped to develop trade relations with the French in order to break the domination of the Dutch East India Company. Embassies were exchanged between Siam and France throughout his reign. Choisy was a colourful character: "De Choisy was born in Paris. His father was attached to the household of the duke of Orléans, and his mother, who was on intimate terms with Anne of Austria, was regularly called upon to amuse Louis XIV. By a whim of his mother, the boy was dressed like a girl until he was eighteen, and, after appearing for a short time in man's costume, he resumed woman's dress on the advice—doubtless satirical—of Madame de La Fayette. He delighted in the most extravagant toilettes until he was publicly rebuked by the duc de Montausier, when he retired for some time to the provinces, using his disguise to assist his numerous intrigues". Chadenat 2582 ('Relation tres curieuse, devenue rare'); Cioranescu XVII, 19372; Cordier, Indosinica, 941. Seller Inventory # 94122

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An Historical Journal of the Transactions at: HUNTER, John

About this Item: John Stockdale, London, 1793. Quarto, with 17 engraved plates, folding maps and charts, list of subscribers; period-style calf, spine gilt in compartments between raised bands. First edition of John Hunter's Journal: a foundation book of Australian coastal exploration which, together with Phillip's account, gives the first charting of Sydney Harbour. Hunter's account is a primary source for the early settlement of Norfolk Island, whose first settlement had also been named Sydney (or Sidney) Town in honour of the Home Secretary.Captain Hunter was appointed second captain of HMS Sirius under Phillip for the voyage to Botany Bay. Once in New South Wales he was actively engaged in surveying and exploration, and only left for England in late 1791 after an enforced stay of eleven months on Norfolk Island following the shipwreck of the Sirius there. In England he published this account, and was later recalled to New South Wales in February of 1795 to replace Captain William Paterson as commander in September of that year.Of particular note is the plate View of the settlement on Sydney Cove, after a sketch by Hunter which is the earliest depiction of the town of Sydney and that of A family of New South Wales after a drawing by Philip Gidley King and given particular beauty by William Blake as engraver. The lower margin of the title cut close with loss of date, as is often the case; otherwise an excellent copy. Seller Inventory # 4107632

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About this Item: 1785. Second edition. Folding map repaired without loss, & 10 engraved plates (one folding). 8vo. Contemporary calf, rebacked. [viii], lvii, 376pp. London, E. Newbery, Rickman, second lieutenant of the Resolution, but for the greater part of the voyage on the Discovery, was the first to publish an account of Cook's Third Voyage. The work was, however, wrongly attributed to Ledyard until 1930 when Judge Howay demonstrated that Ledyard had simply copied whole sections of Rickman's book. The publisher, Newbery, recognised the potential of Rickman's anonymous journal, correctly assuming that it would be as successful as Marra's account of the Second Voyage, which he had also published. The folding plate is of some importance being the first representation in print of Hawaii: ?Representation of the Murder of Capt Cook at O-Why-ee? Forbes 106; Hill, p.253; Holmes 53; Howes R276; Streeter 3474. Seller Inventory # 210333

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Captain Cook's Journal during his First Voyage: COOK: FIRST VOYAGE]

COOK: FIRST VOYAGE] COOK, James. WHARTON, Captain W.J.L., (editor)

Published by Elliot Stock, London (1893)

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: Elliot Stock, London, 1893. Quarto, with portrait frontispiece, four maps and plates bound in as well as three large folding charts in rear endpaper sleeve; in the original polished wooden boards, morocco spine lettered in gilt. A wonderful Cook relic: one of just fifty copies of this special version of the first publication of Cook's "Corner Journal", a very limited edition of a book published in several other forms. This special version is bound with wooden sides made from timber taken from "Cook's Tree" - an elm tree on Clapham Common which, according to local legend, was planted by Cook himself: the tree blew down in 1893. As Holmes notes, the tradition was 'no doubt apocryphal', but one should of course allow relics a life and value of their own. There are after all many more bones of St Catherine of Siena preserved in the cathedrals of Europe than a single skeleton might require. And as for Cook's Cottage in Melbourne? This edition of Cook's Journal, whether in this exotic timbered form or in the more regular versions, was a significant publication anyway, as the first full publication of his journal of the Endeavour voyage, transcribed from the so-called "Corner Journal" in the Mitchell Library (State Library of New South Wales) with additions from the Admiralty journal. 'For the first time one of Cook's journals is presented to the public unmutilated by any editor?' (Holmes). The wooden sides slightly splayed as often seen; a little toning of the edges, a very good copy overall. Seller Inventory # 4303378

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Voyage autour du Monde [and] Journal d'un: BOUGAINVILLE, Louis Antoine

BOUGAINVILLE, Louis Antoine de and James MAGRA

Published by de l'Imprimerie de la Société Typographique, Neuchatel (1773)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: de l'Imprimerie de la Société Typographique, Neuchatel, 1773. Condition: Fine condition. Three volumes, octavo; contemporary French tortoiseshell calf, flat spines gilt in compartments with floral decoration, double labels. The two earliest works on Tahiti brought together to form a complete work: the first French account of Cook's first voyage and the revised edition of Bougainville's narrative: a beautiful set in original French bindings. The two works in three volumes were published as a coherent set, and the three volumes here have clearly always formed a set. These are the second editions of two major books that had first appeared as separate publications in quarto size (Bougainville in French and Magra in English) just two years earlier. The two works are also significant as jointly providing one of the earliest continental sources for early knowledge of the eastern coast of Australia: the Magra text is obviously the more important in that respect, but it is often forgotten that Bougainville reached the Great Barrier Reef, and would probably have come ashore at Cooktown had the reef not prevented him.The first two volumes (Voyage autour du Monde, par la Fregate du Roi La Boudeuse, et la Flute l'Etoile, en 1766, 1767, 1768 & 1769) contain the revised and augmented version of Bougainville's narrative of his circumnavigation, which had been published in its quarto format in 1771. Often considered to be the "best" edition, this second version adds a 'Discours préliminaire' on discoveries in the Pacific since Magellan which takes Cook's First Voyage (1768-71) into account.The Magra account, though the title reads "supplement", is complete in itself (Supplement au Voyage de M. De Bougainville, ou Journal d'un Voyage Autour du Monde, fait par MM. Banks & Solander, Anglois, en 1768, 1769, 1770, 1771. Traduit de l'Anglois, par M. de Freville). This is the second French edition of the earliest published account of Cook's first voyage, and was printed only a year after the first Paris edition. This French edition contains in addition to the Cook voyage narrative a French-Tahitian vocabulary, and adds an extensive 'Lettre de M. de Commerson à M. de La Lande. De l'île de Bourbon, le 18 avril 1771' about Madagascar, and a piece by "M. le B. de G." on the North West Passage (1771), as well as Condamine's "Observations" on Tahiti.As Du Rietz points out in the Kroepelien catalogue, while there were two issues of this publication, one (as here) describing itself as the supplement to Bougainville's account, there is no evident priority between the two which should rather be seen as simultaneous issues.Magra's narrative of the Endeavour voyage, published first in London in 1771, was the first of a series of so-called "surreptitious accounts" of Cook's various voyages to appear in print, published anonymously some two months after the return of Endeavour and nearly two years before Hawkesworth's official account. Provenance: Private collection (Japan). Seller Inventory # 3712564

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Journal of a Voyage to New South: WHITE, John

WHITE, John

Published by J. Debrett, London (1790)

Used Softcover First Edition

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About this Item: J. Debrett, London, 1790. Quarto, with an engraved title page and 65 engraved plates; old full speckled calf. First edition: the foundation of natural history of the new colony, John White's Journal is a travel and ornithological classic by a medical voyager. The handsome volume is "graced by sixty-five engraved plates, all but one of which illustrate the natural history of New South Wales" (Australian Rare Books).John White was chief surgeon of the First Fleet, and was particularly successful in managing both the difficult conditions on the voyage out and the early years of the settlement. He was also a keen amateur naturalist and after arriving at Port Jackson found time to accompany Phillip on two journeys of exploration.The natural history content of the published account makes White's particularly noteworthy amongst the First Fleet journals. Many of the plates were drawn in England by leading natural history artists of the day, such as Sarah Stone, from original sketches done in the colony. White's journal also contains an interesting and valuable account of the voyage from London, with long, detailed accounts of the stops at Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town and of the colonial voyages to Norfolk Island. The book was an immediate success, with subscribers alone accounting for seven hundred copies.There has been much discussion over the years regarding variations in the printing of the first edition of this work, but this copy is a typical example of the standard configuration most often seen, with the earlier errors of the list of subscribers corrected, and the text describing the female wattled Wattled Bee-eater (for a full discussion see Ferguson, 97; Matthews, Birds of Australia, Supplement; and Wantrup, Australian Rare Books, pp. 75-7).An interesting note about this copy is that the front endpaper includes the ownership inscription of a surgeon named Richard Wright dated November 29th 1804; it is perhaps not surprising to see a surgeon's account of the First Fleet owned by another member of the profession. Some intermittent foxing; overall a good copy in old full speckled calf, rebacked. Seller Inventory # 4403136

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About this Item: Printed for Matthew Carey, Philadelphia, 1810. Second edition. 262pp. Sextodecimo [18 cm] Rebound in 1/2 leather over marbled boards. New endsheets and pastedowns. Tissue repair to frontispiece. Includes all six engravings The Patrick Gass Journal was the first published account of the Lewis & Clark expedition, and the 1810 Carey printing, is the first to contain these six illustrations. Wagner/Camp 6:5. Graff 1518. Howes G77. Streeter 3123. Sabin 26741. Seller Inventory # 42800

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