Results (1 - 10) of 10

Show results for

Product Type


Refine by

Condition

Binding

Collectible Attributes

Bookseller Location

  • All Locations

Bookseller Rating

Cyril Clemens (1902-1999), President, International Mark Twain Society, Missouri.

Used

Quantity Available: 1

From: Richard M. Ford Ltd (London, United Kingdom)

Bookseller Rating: 4-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 238.67
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 5.79
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: 1932. ALS, on his presidential letterhead; 14 July 1932, 2pp., 8vo, good condition, with enclosure. His 'Little Visits to the Great' is 'almost ready to go to press, but we are holding things up for the Chapter on "Robert and Sylvia Lynd." If you and Mrs Lynd could glance it over and scratch out any thing that I remembered inaccurately, [.]'. With a mimeographed typewritten copy (1 p, fol.), transcribing three 1937 letters to Clemens, two from Douglas Hyde and the last from W. B. Yeats. They involve the presentation to Hyde and Yeats of the 'triennial Gregory Medal' of the 'Irish Academy of Letters' . Hyde presents Yeats with his medal at the dinner in Hyde's honour: 'I presented your pretty medal to Mr. Yeats after the dinner, and he donned it at once, and it looked very well on him!' On 2 June 1937 Yeats expresses his gratitude to Clemens: 'I am very grateful and will pass it on as an heirloom to my children.'. Bookseller Inventory # 15823

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 1.

Twain, Mark (aka Samuel Clemens).

Published by np nd

Used Signed

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 2,875.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 4.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: np nd. One page, 6.25 x 4, on plain lined paper, boldly written to (Noah) Brooks, dated May 19: "Very much obliged. Will you please endorse this check over to Tommy or cash it & pay him? It is 15 folios -- for long jobs I have always paid 8 & 10 cents -- am paying Tommy something more per folio as it is a short job. Truly yrs" AND SIGNED "MARK" BY MARK TWAIN. Couple of ink smudges, small ink identification at top of page, affixed to slightly larger, stiff card. A bit sloppy, with a couple of cross-outs. Bookseller Inventory # 97-8691

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 2.

Twain, Mark (Samuel L. Clemens)

Published by Toronto (1885)

Used

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 2,875.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 4.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: Toronto, 1885. Two sheets of off-white laid paper, 9 x 5.5, written in pencil, each sheet partly mounted on reverse (from old autograph album?), folds else a nice example of a friendly letter to his friend "Brooks". The letter reads: "My Dear Brooks -- The both of us thank you most heartily for your kind offer, but to our great regret we have got to lose the opportunity. Business matters will keep me in New York till the latest moment; & besides, the platform is an exacting damned institution, & does not permit me to eat anything aftr 2 o'clock p.m. -- have to talk on an empty stomach always. But I hope you will give me a chance to look at you that night & have a shake of your hand for old friendship's sake. Sincerely yours S.L. Clemens." COA: R&R. Bookseller Inventory # 97-9788

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 3.

TWAIN, Mark] CLEMENS, S. L.

Published by Nov. 27 / '81., Windsor Hotel, Montreal,

Used

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 3,500.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 4.50
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: Nov. 27 / '81., Windsor Hotel, Montreal, One page. 8-1/2 x 6 inches. Horizontal creases where folded; small void, about 1/4" in diameter, falls between two lines of writing and barely touches two pen strokes. Ink very slightly faded; perfectly legible. Regarding foreign publication on various dates in December (England, Germany, Denmark and Canada) to secure copyright of The [unnamed] Prince and the Pauper. Bookseller Inventory # 63768

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 4.

TWAIN, Mark.

Used Signed

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 3,750.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 7.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. ("SLC") in black fountain pen ink on the verso of a letter sent to him, London, England, July 5, 1897. 5 1/8" x 8 1/8", 1 page. Very good (minor signs of handling; ). The letter is written on the back of a letter addressed to Twain from his Realtor, Ridout & Co., acknowledging the arrangements have been made "to continue the tenancy for a week from today. . ." Twain writes to his British publishers Chatto and Windus: "Dear C + W: We leave England early in the morning the 9th. Will you please have our inventory man come day after tomorrow (6th Tuesday) - & have him notify Ridout's inventory man to come out at the same time. . .The rest of the book is now ready. Let your messenger come toward noon tomorrow (Monday) & I will deliver it - both the original, for you, & the typed copy to be sent to H.[enry] H.[uttleston] Rogers, 26 Broadway, New York." The aforementioned book is his travel work "Following the Equator," which he had originally delivered in May but had difficulty completing until this time in July. The book would finally be published in November 1897. Twain first met Henry Huttleston Rogers in 1893. Rogers, a successful businessman and principal in Standard Oil, took the financially challenged Twain under his wind and provided sound business advice and direction. It was Rogers who suggested that Twain file for bankruptcy and transfer ownership of his copyrights to his wife in order to protect the family's interests. "Following the Equator" was an immediate success, selling more than 30,000 copies initially. The financial success of the book made it possible for Rogers, who also served as Twain's benefactor, to settle all of Twain's debts and invest on his behalf. See BAL 3453 "There is a possibility that this London edition was issued a few days prior to the American edition but the record is not clear. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 609302

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 5.

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 3,812.03
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 10.31
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: Asking Stead to have the Review of Reviews sent to Chatto & Windus's London address 'as soon as you get the world's peace secured to your satisfaction', and announcing an impending stay in London ('for I'm a coming'). Twain alludes in this letter to Stead's influential coverage of the major international peace conference instigated by Czar Nicolas II and held at The Hague from May to July 1899. Stead had toured Europe in the autumn of 1898 to promote the Russian initiative and speak to politicians and diplomats; he had spoken confidentially to the czar himself ('emperor of peace') during his visit to Livadia. Gleaning information about the secret talks from friendly delegates, he published reports in the Review of Reviews (which he had founded in 1890) and other British and Dutch newspapers; he also wrote to the czar about the proceedings. Keenly read by the delegates themselves, his reports proved to be a major source of information about the conference.Earlier that year Twain had composed a lengthy reply to Stead's request for his views on the czar's proposed plan for world disarmament: ". Peace by compulsion. That seems a better idea than the other. Peace by persuasion has a pleasant sound, but I think we should not be able to work it. We should have to tame the human race first, and history seems to show that that cannot be done ." (The Selected Letters of Mark Twain, ed. C. Neider, 1982, pages254-5). In the present letter Twain could be referring to an issue of the Review of Reviews in which his views on disarmament may have been published."[Stead] was best remembered by his contemporaries not only for his devotion to the international peace movement but also for his advocacy of women's rights, defence of civil liberties, and concern for the deprived and oppressed . Above all Stead was influential in demonstrating how the press could be used to influence public opinion and government policy, for his skilful use of investigative journalism, and for his use of the interview to revitalize British journalism" (ODNB).Stead was due to speak on world peace at a conference in New York in April 1912; he was last seen helping women and children onto the Titanic's lifeboats. Bookseller Inventory # 26335

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 6.

TWAIN, Mark.

Used Soft cover First Edition Signed

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 6,500.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 7.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. 8vo. 2 pages (two separate leaves, on laid paper watermarked "Keyston Linen"; traces of mounting on versos). Enclosed in a 1/2 brown morocco slipcase and folding chemise. To William Dean Howells: "G. Grist' is George Iles. It is a good squib, but I don't know whether it is suitable or not. You will know. I suppose you pigeon-hole a thing sometimes against the final day of publication - a day most unlikely in our lifetime, I do assure you. Come to think, I am in an odd position for a valuable author. If I should write a book, I couldn't publish it in under ten years, It ever." Clemems then goes on to report that he had seen Mrs. Howells and Howells' daughter and almost accompanied them down to Boston for a visit. At this point in his career, Clemens had immersed himself in business matters (most notably the ill-fated backing of the Paige typsetter) to the exclusion of most literary activities. One relative minor endeavor was his assistance in the completion of the much-delayed anthology "Mark Twain's Library Humor," anonymously edited by Howells and published by Webster in 1888. It is to this work which he no doubt alludes with his suggestion for the inclusion of Iles' sketch. An apparently unpublished letter, unrecorded in the Union Catalogue of Mark Twain Letters. Howells (1837-1920), American novelist, editor, critic, poet, and long-time friend of Mark Twain. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 601291

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 7.

Autograph Letter, Signed: Clemens, Samuel L.

Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain)

Published by N.p., (Hartford) (1889)

Used Signed

Quantity Available: 1

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 7,500.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 10.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: N.p., (Hartford), 1889. (3)pp., rectos only. Dated July 15, 1889, from Clemens to his daughter, Clara, signed "Papa," about a train disaster in Virginia. An update about the wreck arrived in a letter while Clemens was dining with his friend, Charles Dudley Warner, a fellow American writer. Clemens's vivid description of the event brings alive the immediacy of the disaster. He writes, ". that late accident still grows & grows. There had been a washout; several hundred feet of the road were gone; two hours after midnight that sleeping-car train dashed in to that vacant space in a pouring rain, & mingled its wreckage with the chaos of rocks, weeds, rails & freshet-rubbish contributed by the washout; the crushed passengers woke up & wailed out in that rainy thick darkness; then the cheerful car-stove came to their help; & gave them light, & burnt them up." He goes on to describe how a young girl (Miss Patty Carrington) was killed in the fire, and how the girl's adoptive mother, Mrs. Judge Thompson, who survived the crash, lost all of her clothing and baggage containing two centuries-worth of family heirlooms as well. The accident to which he refers happened on July 2, 1889, on the Norfolk & Western Railroad line near Thaxton, VA. It was the most serious accident in the railroad's history: seventeen people were killed and many more were injured. Clemens closes the letter on a lighter note, describing a piece by Beethoven performed by his neice: "the one where, all along & all along, half a dozen of the bass notes keep rolling back down stairs a little way - only to the first landing; & get up again & roll down again & are the darling of the piece & the charm of it." He signs the letter, "Goodbye dear heart - write me again. Papa. P.S. I don't mean this letter as an answer to your letter, it is merely a response." With the original envelope addressed to Clara in Elmira, NY, where Clemens and his family kept a summer home. A dramatic and historical letter that captures Clemens's instinct for storytelling. Fine. Bookseller Inventory # 24731

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 8.

Autograph letter signed ("Mark Twain").: Mark Twain (d.

Mark Twain (d. i. Samuel Langhorne Clemens), writer, writer (1835-1910).

Published by Riverdale-on-Hudson, 1 November 1901 (1901)

Used

Quantity Available: 1

From: Kotte Autographs GmbH (Roßhaupten, Germany)

Bookseller Rating: 4-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 10,292.58
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 11.71
From Germany to U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: Riverdale-on-Hudson, 1 November 1901, 1901. 3 pages. 8vo. On black-edged mourning paper. With envelope. To Miss Helen Ingleby "& the other friends", of Heacham Hall, Norfolk, describing how his family and friends would play the Meisterschaft to audiences of hundred friends (".not ten of whom knew the German tongue, but they always had an enjoyable time just the same, for we played it with tremendous spirit. I think I appeared in only one scene. it was between papa & the German boarding-house Frau, & these parts were done in English, & were not written down, but made up as we went along as a convenience for us incapables, as I was not able to memorize a part."). 'IT IS A PLEASANTLY ASTONISHING THING TO BE GREETED WITH SALUTATIONS FROM THE BLOOD OF POCAHONTAS' Mark Twain writes to a descendant of John Rolfe and Pocahontas at Heacham Hall, Norfolk; this being the Rolfe family seat, which the princess and her son, Thomas Rolfe, visited in 1618, a year before her death; Twain adding that "it is a long time since anything less expected has happened to me. It makes me feel pretty recent, as to American origin". His three-act Meisterschaft (1888) was described as a 'Patent Universally-Applicable Automatically-Adjustable Language Drama. adjustable to any tongue, and performable in any tongue'. Bookseller Inventory # 60583

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 9.

Autograph letter signed ("From your well-wishing friend: Twain, Mark (d.

Twain, Mark (d. i. Samuel Langhorne Clemens), writer, writer (1835-1910).

Published by At Sea, 28 August 1895 (1895)

Used

Quantity Available: 1

From: Kotte Autographs GmbH (Roßhaupten, Germany)

Bookseller Rating: 4-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 19,979.71
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 11.71
From Germany to U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Item Description: At Sea, 28 August 1895, 1895. 3 pages. 8vo. To "Jack", promising to celebrate his birthday that evening, making "all the noise the captain will allow", describing him as a naturalist and explaining that the enclosed poem ('Invocation') is for those interested in the fauna of Australia, as he is, and therefore sending "privately & confidentially" a copy of his "great work" as it stands, mentioning that he has not yet worked in the moa, emu or dodo ("but I am after them"). 'COME, KANGAROO, THE GOOD & TRUE/FORESHORTENED AS TO LEGS/AND BODY TAPERED LIKE A CHURN': The poem was first published in The Mercury in Australia on 2 November 1895. Clemens himself printed it in Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World, 1897, and explained that an English naturalist [presumably the addressee 'Jack'] on board had told him much about the animals of Australia and their origins, particularly the platypus and kangaroo. The Mercury reported that at a lecture Clemens had stated: 'I have a poem. I have written a poem only once in 30 years. I have now written one of four stanzas.I always have an inspiration to write a poem -- once every 30 years.First I thought of Sydney Harbour.Then I thought of the fauna of Australia.I made a list of them and began.I can say now that the most difficult thing in the world to do is to write poetry when you don't know how.'. Bookseller Inventory # 60582

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question 10.

Results (1 - 10) of 10