Results (1 - 5) of 5

Show results for

Product Type

  • All Product Types
  • Books (5)
  • Magazines & Periodicals
  • Comics
  • Sheet Music
  • Art, Prints & Posters
  • Photographs
  • Maps
  • Manuscripts &
    Paper Collectibles

Refine by

Condition

Binding

Collectible Attributes

Seller Location

  • All Locations

Seller Rating

Kenneth Rexroth.

Used Signed

Quantity Available: 1

From: Anacapa Books (Carmel, CA, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 3-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 150.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 5.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

About this Item: 1937. The form letter solicits manuscripts, on behalf of the Writers' Congress, for its magazine, Pacific Weekley. Printed on one side. On the reverse of the letter is a holographic note from Rexroth inquiring after Saroyan and commenting: "SWince you have become a publisher - how about publishing Rexroth or Bob McAlmon" and goes on toe give McAlmon's address and a few good words. A small strip of paper has been torn off one side of the letter effecting a few lettes of Rexroth's note. Old folds, else a nice copy. Signed by Author. Seller Inventory # 002422

More Information About This Seller | Contact this Seller 1.

Saroyan, William

Published by Fresno, Califronia (1966)

Used

Quantity Available: 1

From: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

Seller Rating: 4-star rating

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 1,500.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 10.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

About this Item: Fresno, Califronia, 1966. 5 pp in all, typed rectos only. 4to (11 x 8-1/2 inches); two sheets cropped. Saroyan, still bitter about the treatment he received from M.G.M. during the production of his screenplay THE HUMAN COMEDY, warily discusses the possibility working in Hollywood again on new works POINTY SHOES and MAMA GIRL, I LOVE YOU: "Now, Metro phoned me and wanted to make a deal but I drove them off, because Mayer cheated me on The Human Comedy, and because the new mob there refused to release TV rights in the book to me, and so on and so forth. Drove them off by saying I wanted a percentage and a quarter of a million dollars. O.K., the hell with it: now, though, may just be the time to make a deal on this novel." Unfortunately, the project stalls. From a later letter, included here: " . I am presuming POINTY SHOES is dead, and good enough."In other letters, Saroyan investigates the logistics of making a film documenting his native town: "I have got to make me a little 5-hour movie about Fresno before the best part of it is torn down and forgotten, and that's happening right now." He discusses current and upcoming projects, mulls over various film and TV possibilities, but is still rankled by his old troubles with M.G.M.-" . that stupid M.G.M. somehow legally got its sticky fingers on The Human Comedy TV rights, too, and has prevented me from making all kind of excellent deals on the property."Written in an easy, chatty style, these letters reveal a writer frustrated by past injustice but nevertheless determined to maintain his prodigious output while pushing for a new break. Faint creases; secretarial marks in red ink. Corrections, cancellations, and annotations in Saroyan's hand 5 pp in all, typed rectos only. 4to (11 x 8-1/2 inches); two sheets cropped. Seller Inventory # 235750

More Information About This Seller | Contact this Seller 2.

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 5,000.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 10.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

About this Item: [New York], 1950. In all, 29 pp. 1 vols. 4to. In all, 29 pp. 1 vols. 4to. The William Saroyan - Al Capp - Carol Marcus Affair. A Saroyan archive of essential biographical importance. In 1943, Armenian-American author William Saroyan, at the peak of his success and fame, married the 17-year-old socialite Carol Marcus. They had two children, Aram (b. 1943) and Lucy (b. 1946), but by 1949, as this archive painfully documents, the marriage was clearly breaking up. In July 1949, the couple agreed to separate; in September of that year they divorced; and Marcus, as a letter here reveals, began an affair with the cartoonist Al Capp. Eventually, Saroyan and Marcus remarried in 1951, but they quickly divorced again in 1952. This archive contains the following letters and documents relating to the marriage and its break-up:1. Several typed and carbon drafts of Saroyan's request for annulment of the marriage, with several autograph corrections and insertions by Saroyan. The essential ground of the complaint was Saroyan's assertion that Marcus deceived him as to her origins, and pretended to be the daughter of a Catholic couple from Long Island, of Scottish, and French-Russian descent, rather than the illegitimate daughter of a Jewish mother, as she later admitted. 14 pages in all2. Carbon copy of the separation agreement of July 1949. 6 pages.3. Draft Typed Letter signed to Al Capp, Jan. 8, 1950. 3pp., with several autograph corrections.4. Draft of the same letter. 1 page5. Another draft of the same letter. 1 page.6. Carbon copy of the final letter to Capp, Jan 8, 1950. 4 pages. A painful and moving letter to Capp regarding Capp's affair with Marcus, a warning to Capp that Marcus had a psychopathic personality ("she tells lies and believes them, makes false accusations, and lives in a world of fantasy"); and his belief that Capp is "wittingly or unwittingly helping this woman to plunge deeper and deeper into a life of fantasy which must eventually bring her to the urgent need of hospitalization, and to her children terrible suffering and heartache ?"Carol Marcus later married the actor Walter Matthau; Aram Saroyan became a writer in his own right; and Lucy Saroyan became an actress. Light creasing to some leaves from prior folding, else fine. Seller Inventory # 36630

More Information About This Seller | Contact this Seller 3.

Unique William Saroyan Collection. 25 Items: Manuscripts,: Saroyan, William; and

About this Item: Condition: vg. 1. Essay:Seven-Page Typed Essay on George Bernard Shaw, written by William Saroyan in London on "October 4, 1944, 12:15 A.M." With the author's holograph corrections (both additions and deletions) throughout. Unpublished.Manuscript preceded by a cover sheet on which Saroyan has typed, "This piece will cost The New York Times one thousand dollars because it took me three hours to write it and I like to get three hundred thirty three dollars thirty three and a third cents per hour, because I think it's worth it, because I think The New York Times can afford it, and because that's how much I want for it."The essay, which details a brief meeting with Shaw ("All told I don't suppose I spent more than forty five minutes with Shaw"), rambles from Saroyan's musings on his own life to an appraisal of the older playwright. Over the course of some 2500 words Saroyan carries on a stream-of-consciousness conversation on Shaw's politics, spirituality and outspokenness, concluding, "It is no good expecting great men to be great. That exertion they reserve for God. Consequently I did not expect to find George Bernard Shaw great. I was not disappointed. He was not great." 2. Two Letters:Four-Page Typed Letter to Whit Wellman at the Five Star Weekly in San Francisco dated April 16, 1937. Author's corrections throughout. Signed by Saroyan. The letter is in response to a previous letter from Wellman that requested material for a piece on "How They Write." Saroyan discusses his fourth book (Little Children), the hundreds of stories he has written and the publications that have printed his stories. He goes on about how and when he writes, noting, "I spend most of my time loafing."Letter from Whit Wellman to Saroyan, dated June 15, 2937, on Five Star Weekly letterhead apologizing for not using more of the material Saroyan sent him. Both letters have rusty paper clip marks, otherwise fine. 3. Telegram, Two Notes and a Letter: Telegram from Saroyan to Arnold Gingrich, founder and editor of Esquire Magazine, dated November 26, 1937. Saroyan rejects Esquire's offer of $150 for one of his stories suggesting it is "either charity or highway robbery" and asks for $500 for a story. One correction in Saroyan's hand. Telegram has small brown stain at upper left.Note from Saroyan to Gingrich, dated December 24, 1937, in which Saroyan again asks for $500 a story or $200 if they want one per month or at least 8 a year. Signed by Saroyan. A note written vertically along the side states "What you need is an alienist," with the initials A.G. In envelope with Saroyan's address in San Francisco but no postmark. Paper clip mark and light brown spot on envelope.Note from Gingrich to Saroyan with envelope postmarked December 28, 1937. Gingrich asks Saroyan to keep sending him scripts. On 3.5X6" note paper with Esquire letterhead.Two-Page Letter from Saroyan to Gingrich dated December 31, 1937. There are two drafts of the letter arguing about Gingrich's offers and Saroyan's prices for his stories. The first letter, marked "Final" in pen at the top of page one is signed "Bill." The second draft is signed "Bill Saroyan."4. Two Letters:Letter from Saroyan to the editor of the New Yorker, dated August 29, 1938 and date stamped August 31, 1938. In this letter Saroyan asks for bad writings by good writers because he is editing An Anthology of Lousy Writing. In Saroyan's funny stream-of-consciousness style, he lays out the project that will be of "far-reaching importance." Signed William Saroyan. Some paper clip marks and creases.Letter to Saroyan from William Maxwell, author and fiction editor of the New Yorker for forty years (1936-1975) dated August 31, 1938. Maxwell tells Saroyan that Mr. Ross (Harold Ross, founder and editor of the New Yorker) doesn't think the letters to the editor department is the place for Saroyan's letter, but they would like more of Saroyan's stories. On New Yorker letterhead. Some creasing and paper clip marks. 5. Two Notes: Note to Saroyan from Lou. Seller Inventory # 32082

More Information About This Seller | Contact this Seller 4.

Add Book to Shopping Basket
Price: US$ 12,000.00
Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 5.00
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

About this Item: NP n/d. Softcover. Condition: vg. Essays and Correspondence: 1. 7-Page Typed Essay on George Bernard Shaw, written in London on "October 4, 1944, 12:15 A.M." With the author's holograph corrections (both additions and deletions) throughout. Unpublished.The manuscript is preceded by a cover sheet on which Saroyan has typed, "This piece will cost The New York Times one thousand dollars because it took me three hours to write it and I like to get three hundred thirty three dollars thirty three and a third cents per hour, because I think it's worth it, because I think The New York Times can afford it, and because that's how much I want for it."The essay, which details a brief meeting with Shaw ("All told I don't suppose I spent more than forty five minutes with Shaw"), rambles from Saroyan's musings on his own life to an appraisal of the older playwright. Over the course of some 2500 words Saroyan carries on a stream-of-consciousness conversation on Shaw's politics, spirituality and outspokenness, concluding, "It is no good expecting great men to be great. That exertion they reserve for God. Consequently I did not expect to find George Bernard Shaw great. I was not disappointed. He was not great." 2. 4-Page Typed Letter to Whit Wellman at the Five Star Weekly in San Francisco dated April 16, 1937. Author's corrections throughout. Signed by Saroyan. The letter is in response to a previous letter from Wellman that requested material for a piece on "How They Write." Saroyan discusses his fourth book, Little Children, the hundreds of stories he has written and the publications that have printed his stories. He goes on about how and when writes, noting, "I spend most of my time loafing."Letter from Whit Wellman to Saroyan, dated June 15, 2937, on Five Star Weekly letterhead apologizing for not using more of the material Saroyan sent him. Both letters have rusty paper clip marks, otherwise fine. Two items.3. Telegram from Saroyan to Arnold Gingrich, founder and editor of Esquire Magazine, dated November 26, 1937. Saroyan rejects Esquire's offer of $150 for one of his stories suggesting it is "either charity or highway robbery" and asks for $500 for a story. One correction in Saroyan's hand. Telegram has small brown stain at upper left.Note from Saroyan to Gingrich, dated December 24, 1937, in which Saroyan again asks for $500 a story or $200 if they want one per month or at least 8 a year. Signed by Saroyan. A note written vertically along the side states "What you need is an alienist," with the initials A.G. In envelope with Saroyan's address in San Francisco but no postmark. Paper clip mark and light brown spot on envelope.Note from Gingrich to Saroyan with envelope postmarked December 28, 1937. Gingrich asks Saroyan to keep sending him scripts. On 3.5X6" note paper with Esquire letterhead.2-Page Letter from Saroyan to Gingrich dated December 31, 1937. There are two drafts of the letter arguing about Gingrich's offers and Saroyan's prices for his stories. The first letter, marked Final in pen at the top of page 1 is signed "Bill." The second draft is signed Bill Saroyan. Four items.4. Letter from Saroyan to the editor of the New Yorker, dated August 29, 1938 and time stamped August 31, 1938. In this letter Saroyan asks for bad writings by good writers because he is editing An Anthology of Lousy Writing. In Saroyan's funny stream-of-consciousness style, he lays out the project that will be of "far-reaching importance." Signed William Saroyan. Some paper clip marks and creases.Letter to Saroyan from William Maxwell, author and fiction editor of the New Yorker for forty years (1936-1975) dated August 31, 1938. Maxwell tells Saroyan that Mr. Ross (Harold Ross, founder and editor of the New Yorker) doesn't think the letters to the editor department is the place for Saroyan's letter, but they would like more of Saroyan's stories. On New Yorker letterhead. Some creasing and paper clip marks. Two items.5. Note to Saroyan from Louis Adamic, author and editor of Common Ground m. Seller Inventory # 25754

More Information About This Seller | Contact this Seller 5.

Results (1 - 5) of 5