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About this Item: Folio Society, London, limited edition, 2004, 2004. Limited edition of 1010 numbered copies for the Folio Society. 2 vols, facsimile: full cream morocco with three false raised bands, decorated in brown and gold, with onlays of red morocco decorated in black, blue and gold, to designs by David Eccles, gilt edges; commentary volume: full green-blue buckram with a simpl From the publisher's description: "On Christmas Eve 1433, the young King Henry VI arrived at the abbey Bury St. Edmunds, one of the largest religious foundations in fifteenth-century England. He remained there until Easter and at the end of his stay was admitted to the abbey's confraternity. To cement the abbey's relationship with the king, Abbot William Curteys conceived the idea of commemorating Henry's visit with a 'life' of the Anglo-Saxon king, St. Edmund, the patron saint of the abbey. The man charged with the task of translating the 'life' of St. Edmund was John Lydgate, a monk at the abbey and the preeminent poet of the fifteenth century. It is hard to overstate the importance of the resulting manuscript, both as a monument to the development of the English language, and for its illustrations - 120 images, forming narrative sequences integrated to form a coherent visual parallel to the text and with a careful fidelity to detail. The completed manuscript that was presented to the young king remained in his library until after his deposition, and although it left royal hands for a time, it reappears in the inventories of the library of Henry VIII. It is now in The British Library." The bulk of the commentary volume consists of an annotated transcription of the manuscript [by Professor A.S.G. Edwards]. The facsimile faithfully captures the beauty of the Life, one of the most elaborately illustrated of 15th-century English poetic manuscripts. Every application of gold leaf has been carefully replicated and blocked in gold onto the printed sheets, giving just such a dazzling effect as the original manuscript. The binding, devised by David Eccles is appropriately grand, with red leather onlays onto cream goatskin, ornamented with coloured and gold foils to a design drawn entirely from elements within the manuscript itself - note the Plantagenet royal arms nestling within the illuminated T. All copies were hand-bound by the craftsmen of Smith Settle in Yorkshire. Copy no. 256. Minor scuffs to fore-edge gilding, otherwise as new in publisher's box. Seller Inventory # ABE-33891

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About this Item: Folio Society, London, limited edition, 2004, 2004. Limited edition of 1010 numbered copies for the Folio Society. 2 vols, facsimile: full cream morocco with three false raised bands, decorated in brown and gold, with onlays of red morocco decorated in black, blue and gold, to designs by David Eccles, gilt edges; commentary volume: full green-blue buckram with a simpl From the publisher's description: "On Christmas Eve 1433, the young King Henry VI arrived at the abbey Bury St. Edmunds, one of the largest religious foundations in fifteenth-century England. He remained there until Easter and at the end of his stay was admitted to the abbey's confraternity. To cement the abbey's relationship with the king, Abbot William Curteys conceived the idea of commemorating Henry's visit with a 'life' of the Anglo-Saxon king, St. Edmund, the patron saint of the abbey. The man charged with the task of translating the 'life' of St. Edmund was John Lydgate, a monk at the abbey and the preeminent poet of the fifteenth century. It is hard to overstate the importance of the resulting manuscript, both as a monument to the development of the English language, and for its illustrations - 120 images, forming narrative sequences integrated to form a coherent visual parallel to the text and with a careful fidelity to detail. The completed manuscript that was presented to the young king remained in his library until after his deposition, and although it left royal hands for a time, it reappears in the inventories of the library of Henry VIII. It is now in The British Library." The bulk of the commentary volume consists of an annotated transcription of the manuscript [by Professor A.S.G. Edwards]. The facsimile faithfully captures the beauty of the Life, one of the most elaborately illustrated of 15th-century English poetic manuscripts. Every application of gold leaf has been carefully replicated and blocked in gold onto the printed sheets, giving just such a dazzling effect as the original manuscript. The binding, devised by David Eccles is appropriately grand, with red leather onlays onto cream goatskin, ornamented with coloured and gold foils to a design drawn entirely from elements within the manuscript itself - note the Plantagenet royal arms nestling within the illuminated T. All copies were hand-bound by the craftsmen of Smith Settle in Yorkshire. Copy No. 607. As new in publisher's box. Seller Inventory # ABE-31219

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About this Item: Folio Society, London, limited edition, 2004, 2004. Limited edition of 1010 numbered copies for the Folio Society. 2 vols, facsimile: full cream morocco with three false raised bands, decorated in brown and gold, with onlays of red morocco decorated in black, blue and gold, to designs by David Eccles, gilt edges; commentary volume: full green-blue buckram with a simpl From the publisher's description: "On Christmas Eve 1433, the young King Henry VI arrived at the abbey Bury St. Edmunds, one of the largest religious foundations in fifteenth-century England. He remained there until Easter and at the end of his stay was admitted to the abbey's confraternity. To cement the abbey's relationship with the king, Abbot William Curteys conceived the idea of commemorating Henry's visit with a 'life' of the Anglo-Saxon king, St. Edmund, the patron saint of the abbey. The man charged with the task of translating the 'life' of St. Edmund was John Lydgate, a monk at the abbey and the preeminent poet of the fifteenth century. It is hard to overstate the importance of the resulting manuscript, both as a monument to the development of the English language, and for its illustrations - 120 images, forming narrative sequences integrated to form a coherent visual parallel to the text and with a careful fidelity to detail. The completed manuscript that was presented to the young king remained in his library until after his deposition, and although it left royal hands for a time, it reappears in the inventories of the library of Henry VIII. It is now in The British Library." The bulk of the commentary volume consists of an annotated transcription of the manuscript [by Professor A.S.G. Edwards]. The facsimile faithfully captures the beauty of the Life, one of the most elaborately illustrated of 15th-century English poetic manuscripts. Every application of gold leaf has been carefully replicated and blocked in gold onto the printed sheets, giving just such a dazzling effect as the original manuscript. The binding, devised by David Eccles is appropriately grand, with red leather onlays onto cream goatskin, ornamented with coloured and gold foils to a design drawn entirely from elements within the manuscript itself - note the Plantagenet royal arms nestling within the illuminated T. All copies were hand-bound by the craftsmen of Smith Settle in Yorkshire. Copy No. 671. As new in publisher's box. Seller Inventory # ABE-33031

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About this Item: Folio, London, England, 2004. Hardcover. Condition: Fine. Limited Edition. Limited edition, Number 535 of 1010 numbered copies for the Folio Society. 2 vols, Facsimile: full cream morocco with three false raised bands, decorated in brown and gold, with onlays of red morocco decorated in black, blue and gold, to designs by David Eccles, gilt edges; commentary volume: full green-blue buckram with a simpl From the publisher's description: "On Christmas Eve 1433, the young King Henry VI arrived at the abbey Bury St. Edmunds, one of the largest religious foundations in fifteenth-century England. He remained there until Easter and at the end of his stay was admitted to the abbey's confraternity. To cement the abbey's relationship with the king, Abbot William Curteys conceived the idea of commemorating Henry's visit with a 'life' of the Anglo-Saxon king, St. Edmund, the patron saint of the abbey. The man charged with the task of translating the 'life' of St. Edmund was John Lydgate, a monk at the abbey and the preeminent poet of the fifteenth century. It is hard to overstate the importance of the resulting manuscript, both as a monument to the development of the English language, and for its illustrations - 120 images, forming narrative sequences integrated to form a coherent visual parallel to the text and with a careful fidelity to detail. The completed manuscript that was presented to the young king remained in his library until after his deposition, and although it left royal hands for a time, it reappears in the inventories of the library of Henry VIII. It is now in The British Library." The bulk of the commentary volume consists of an annotated transcription of the manuscript. The facsimile faithfully captures the beauty of the Life, one of the most elaborately illustrated of 15th-century English poetic manuscripts. Every application of gold leaf has been carefully replicated and blocked in gold onto the printed sheets, giving just such a dazzling effect as the original manuscript. The binding, devised by David Eccles is appropriately grand, with red leather onlays onto cream goatskin, ornamented with coloured and gold foils to a design drawn entirely from elements within the manuscript itself - note the Plantagenet royal arms nestling within the illuminated T. All copies were hand-bound by the craftsmen of Smith Settle in Yorkshire. As new in publisher's box. Seller Inventory # 046004

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