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About this Item: Bln.: Suhrkamp, 2014, 2014. Tb. Okart. 308 S. Mit Textnachweisen. (Hint. Buchd. m. Buchhändleretikett, sonst wie neu). (= edition suhrkamp, es 2678). Seller Inventory # B75116

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About this Item: Condition: New. New. Seller Inventory # STR-0198237030

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About this Item: Condition: New. New. Seller Inventory # STR-0199243158

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About this Item: Oxford Clarendon Press, 1956, 1955, 1958 bzw. 1962., 1956. 8° Oln. Condition: Gut. Nachdrucke der jeweils 2. Aufl. Aufl.. xvi + 515; x + 747; xvi + 541; xiv + 829 S. Mit einer Karte in Bd. I u. einer beiliegenden Karte in Bd.II Sehr guter Zustand; bei Band IV der Einband etwas angebleicht Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 550. Seller Inventory # 7610

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CROCE, Benedetto

Published by Oxford at the Clarendon Press, Oxford (1927)

Used
First Edition
Hardcover

Quantity Available: 1

From: C.P. Collins Booksellers (Leichhardt, NSW, Australia)

Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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About this Item: Oxford at the Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1927. Boards. Condition: Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: Fine. First UK Edition. (116pp). Dust jacket mylar-protected. Nicely preserved copy. RARE Size: Small Octavo. Hardcover. Seller Inventory # 042702

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About this Item: Petersburg., 2002. Hardcover. Condition: Good. n/a. Please contact us for details on condition of available copies of the book. We have thousands of titles and often several copies of each title may be available. SKUALB041860799393 Language: Russian (unless indicated otherwise by the description). Seller Inventory # ALB041860799393

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About this Item: Petersburg, 2002. Hardcover. Condition: Good. n/a. Please contact us for details on condition of available copies of the book. We have thousands of titles and often several copies of each title may be available. SKUALB042610581077 Language: Russian (unless indicated otherwise by the description). Seller Inventory # ALB042610581077

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About this Item: ALL CONCERNING CAPTAIN BATHURST’S CALL TO BE A WITNESS AT THE COURT-MARTIAL IN 1815 OF LIEUTENANT GENERAL SIR JOHN MURRAY, EIGHTH BARONET, WHOSE CONDUCT IN 1813 WAS CONDEMNED BY WELLINGTON AND ADMIRAL BENJAMIN HALLOWELL. 2 ALSs (Autograph Letter, Signed) & 2 LSs (Letter, Signed). (1) : Manners-Sutton, L.S., folio, 28/12/1814. 1 side, with subject & date in Bathurst’s hand on verso. (2) : Oldham, A.L.S., 23 x 18cm. 31/12/1814. 1 side, with subject & date in Bathurst’s hand on verso. (3) : Northesk, A.L.S., 24 x 19cm. N.D. "Rec’d. 1815" (Bathurst). 1 side, 2 blank sides, + address panel, Bathurst’s note, & part of Northesk’s seal. (4) : Palmerston, L.S., folio. 27/3/1815. 1 ½ sides + Bathurst’s note. ALL : 2 closed tears (Northesk & Palmerston) without loss, o/w fox-free (except for very slight browning around a couple of edges) ;fresh, crisp & V.G. +. Sir John Murray (1768?-1827) was an army officer with extensive service behind him by 1813. He had commanded the 84th foot at the capture of the Cape in 1796, saw service in India and the Red Sea, and while in Aden in 1800 he was appointed quartermaster-general of the Indian army and proceeded to Egypt, crossing the desert to Cairo and descending the Nile. He served under Wellesley at Poona in 1803 but his superior found he lacked self-confidence and was inefficient. After service with Sir John Moore, he again joined Wellesley’s army in Portugal in 1809. Wellington rejected Murray’s application to join the Peninsular army, and in 1812 was appointed to the army in Sicily under Lord William Bentinck. In late February 1813 Murray arrived at Alicante and took command of a motley force of British, Sicilians, and others. Wellington suggested he recapture Tarragona but Murray delayed indecisively. The French attacked Murray at Castalla and Murray defeated them but failed to take advantage of his victory. On 31st May he disembarked his force of some 12,000, chiefly Spaniards (only 4,500 were British and German) before reaching Tarragona. He displayed nervous indecision before hastily re-embarking his troops on 12th June, leaving some guns and stores behind. Instead of obeying instructions to proceed to Valencia to support the Spaniards, he landed his men at the Col de Balaguer where Bentinck arrived four days later and assumed command. Wellington (and the public back home) was furious with Murray’s disregard of his instructions, and with his sacrifice of guns and stores. Admiral Hallowell, who commanded naval forces at Tarragona, also complained of Murray’s conduct, and government ordered a court-martial and Murray was sent home. After a long delay Murray was arraigned at Winchester on the 16th January 1815 before a number of distinguished officers. He was charged with alleged unmilitary conduct, neglect of duty and disobedience to Wellington’s written instructions, and neglect of proper preparations for re-embarking his troops. Murray tried to lie his way out of it and to blame others. After sitting for 15 days, Murray’s falsehoods, apparently paralysing his accusers, he was acquitted on all charges except for abandoning the guns and stores, for which he was sentenced to be admonished. The Prince Regent, however, dispensed with the admonition and in 1816 Murray was awarded a GCH and he demanded a medal for Castalla and a red riband ‘to cancel former injuries’. Sir John Fortescue (in his British Army) suggests that from the start, Murray had been under the protection of the Court, and confirms the verdict of contemporary critics : ‘He (Murray) must be pilloried by history without mercy as a cowardly and dishonourable man, unworthy to hold his Sovereign’s commission, or to wear the red coat of a British soldier.’ To this piece of theatre, Captain Walter Bathurst, RN (1764?-1827) was called as a witness. Bathurst had a long and distinguished naval career (see his ODNB entry) and, under Codrington at Navarino in 1827, his ship in the heart of the battle, sustained considerably more dead and. Seller Inventory # C147V451

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WORLD WAR I MANUSCRIPT DIARY KEPT BY: Platten, J[ohn] R[ussell]

About this Item: 4to.16 leaves, ruled, pencil manuscript in legible cursive hand on rectos only. Bound in blue paper wrappers with marbled spine [light wear], paper label affixed to front cover. On each of the last three leaves, a bottom tear costs 4-8 lines of text. Good+. This is a first hand-account of the Siege of Antwerp written by John Russell Platten of the Collingwood Battalion. The Battalion was named after Lord Cuthbert Collingwood, Vice Admiral, and composed primarily of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. The Diary's abrupt change of tone, from pre-combat innocence to the horrors of war, is striking. The Battalion left Dover on Sunday, October 4, 1914, and landed at Dunkirk. They were sent to relieve the Belgians at Whybreck. On October 5th the Collingwood men occupied trenches beyond Antwerp. Bombarded for three days, they remained under fire through the night of October 8, with part of Antwerp ablaze. On October 9 the remaining garrison surrendered. Of the 700 seamen, only 22 reportedly got back to England; the rest were killed, or captured and interned in Holland or Germany. The October 4 entry describes the soldiers' jubilation upon learning that they would be "leaving for the continent." They marched to Dover, Patten's father and brother accompanying him until they reached the pier and said their goodbyes. On their way to Dunkirk the next day, they attacked their tins of "bully beef" with their bayonets and met a French torpedo boat, tossing halfpennies to the French soldiers as mementos and laughing as the soldiers scrambled after them. The excitement lasted into the next day as they were "pressed mug after mug of lager to drink as they wished;" ladies brought them aprons filled with cigarettes. After more cheer the Collingwood Battalion was assigned "the first blood" and headed to the trenches. Here the tone of the diary quickly changes. The morning of October 7th an "aeroplane sailed over"; a "German Taube machine," it dropped four bombs on them. They built "bomb proof shelters," raiding a nearby home for supplies. Platten describes the fallen faces of the farmer and his wife as they watched the men tear down doors, smash wardrobes, and knock the bottoms out of drawers. The men returned to the trenches and hunkered down while projectiles shrieked overhead. They expected an attack around dawn; Platten calls it the longest night he had ever experienced. On the morning of the 8th, news reached them that the Colonel had been killed, that they needed to hold the trenches "at all costs" until the following night, and that General Lawlinson would then try to relieve them. "We number something under eight thousand, they on the safe side of a hundred thousand. Major Cooreman is done & his mind seems to be giving way." The men attempted to retreat, but were ordered back. "The whole of Antwerp seems to be in flames. The trenches are falling in now owing to the shells and several men have been buried alive." A further entry: "My mind is almost a blank & I walk as if in a dream. Another man has gone mad and I don't think any of us can go much further." The British Naval Archives lists John Russell Platten with Service Number 4/2670, a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve at London; date of birth December 12, 1892; ranks of Ordinary Seaman, Able Seaman (undated), and Acting Leading Seaman Royal Naval Division. He joined the 4th Battalion a/k/a Collingwood Battalion at the outbreak of war, about August 2, 1914. He was later reported as being interned in Holland on October 8, 1914. Seller Inventory # 33756

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