On the conversion of electric oscillations into continuous currents by means of a vacuum valve: ...

On the conversion of electric oscillations into continuous currents by means of a vacuum valve

Fleming, John Ambrose

Published by London, 1905
Hardcover
From Jeremy Norman's historyofscience (Novato, CA, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since January 9, 1999 Seller Rating 2-star rating

Association Member: ABAA

Quantity Available: 1

Buy Used
Price: US$ 1,650.00 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 7.50 Within U.S.A. Destination, rates & speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

The Beginning of Electronics Fleming, John Ambrose (1849-1945). On the conversion of electric oscillations into continuous currents by means of a vacuum valve. In Proceedings of the Royal Society. 74 (1905): 476-487. Whole volume, 8vo. [66, variously paginated], 580pp. Plates, text illustrations. Later library buckram, very minor rubbing and wear. Book-label and stamps of the Liverpool Athenaeum. First Edition. Fleming's paper introducing the basic principle of the two-electrode vacuum tube or diode marked the beginning of electronics. Before the development of the transistor the vacuum tube became the first switch used in the earliest electronic computers. Using vacuum tubes as switches, the first general purpose electronic computer, the ENIAC, operated 10,000 times the speed of a human computer. By comparison, the Harvard Mark 1, which used electromechnical relays as switches, computed 100 times the speed of a human computer. An electrical engineer and physicist who had worked with Thomas Edison's company in London, and a consultant to Guglielmo Marconi, Fleming invented and patented the two-electrode vacuum-tube rectifier, which he called the oscillation valve. This was called a thermionic valve, vacuum diode, kenotron, thermionic tube, or Fleming valve. Fleming' diode was an essential step in the development of radio, In 1906 Lee de Forest introduced a third electrode called the grid into the vacuum tube. The resulting triode could be used both as an amplifier and a switch. In this form the vacuum tube was used in radio receivers and radar until it was superseded by solid state electronics more than 50 years later. The first electronic computer, the ENIAC, used 18,000 vacuum tubes as switches. Vacuum tubes were used in electronic computers until the late 1950s, and they are still manufactured today for specialty analogue Hi-Fi equipment. Printing and the Mind of Man 396. Bookseller Inventory # 40296

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: On the conversion of electric oscillations ...

Publisher: London

Publication Date: 1905

Binding: Hardcover

Edition: First edition.

Store Description

Visit Seller's Storefront

Association Member Members of these associations are committed to maintaining the highest standards. They vouch for the authenticity of all items offered for sale. They provide expert and detailed descriptions, disclose all significant defects and/or restorations, provide clear and accurate pricing, and operate with fairness and honesty during the purchase experience.
Terms of Sale:

Shipping charges will be applied to all orders. All items are guaranteed as described and all purchases may
be returned for any reason within two weeks of receipt. Please notify us in advance if you are making a
return.
Legal entity: Jeremy Norman & Co., Inc.
Business address: 936-B Seventh St., PMB 238, Novato, CA 94945-3000
Email address: orders@jnorman.com
Phone: 415-892-3181
Federal Tax ID Number:94-2261335
Authorized representative: Jeremy M. Norman


Shipping Terms:

Orders usually ship within 2 business days. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping cost is required.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express

Money Order PayPal Bank Draft Bank/Wire Transfer