Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited

4.16 avg rating
( 119,265 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780060776091: Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future - of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Huxley's most enduring masterpiece.

Following Brave New World is the nonfiction work Brave New World Revisited, first published in 1958. It is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with the prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

Aldous Huxley (1894–1963) is the author of the classic novels Brave New World, Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Perennial Philosophy and The Doors of Perception. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles, California.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Foreword

The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situation. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplifica­tion. Omission and simplification help us to understand — but help us, in many cases, to understand the wrong thing; for our comprehension may be only of the abbreviator’s neatly formulated notions, not of the vast, ramifying reality from which these notions have been so arbitrarily abstracted.

But life is short and information endless: nobody has time for everything. In practice we are generally forced to choose between an unduly brief exposition and no exposition at all. Abbreviation is a necessary evil and the abbreviator’s business is to make the best of a job which, though intrinsically bad, is still better than nothing. He must learn to simplify, but not to the point of falsification. He must learn to concentrate upon the essentials of a situation, but without ignoring too many of real­ity’s qualifying side-issues. In this way he may be able to tell not indeed the whole truth (for the whole truth about almost any important subject is incompatible with brevity), but considerably more than the dangerous quarter-truths and half-truths which have always been the current coin of thought.

The subject of freedom and its enemies is enormous, and what I have written is certainly too short to do it full justice; but at least I have touched on many aspects of the problem. Each aspect may have been somewhat over-simplified in the exposition; but these successive over-simplifications add up to a picture that, I hope, gives some hint of the vastness and com­plexity of the original.

Omitted from the picture (not as being unim­portant, but merely for convenience and because I have discussed them on earlier occasions) are the mechanical and military enemies of freedom — the weapons and gadgets which have so power-fully strengthened the hands of the world’s rulers against their subjects, and the ever more ruin­ously costly preparations for ever more senseless and suicidal wars. The chapters that follow should be read against a background of thoughts about the Hungarian uprising and its repression, about the H-bombs, about the cost of what every nation refers to as ‘defence’, about those endless columns of uniformed boys, white, black, brown, yellow, marching obediently towards the common grave.

Chapter I
Overpopulation

In 1931, when Brave New World was being written, I was convinced that there was still plenty of time. The completely organized society, the scientific caste system, the abolition of free will by methodi­cal conditioning, the servitude made acceptable by regular doses of chemically induced happiness, the orthodoxies drummed in by nightly courses of sleep-teaching — these things were coming all right, but not in my time, not even in the time of my grandchildren. I forget the exact date of the events recorded in Brave New World; but it was somewhere in the sixth or seventh century A.F. (after Ford). We who were living in the second quarter of the twentieth century A.D. were the inhabitants, admittedly, of a gruesome kind of universe; but the nightmare of those depression years was radically different from the nightmare of the future, described in Brave New World. Ours was a nightmare of too little order; theirs, in the seventh century A.F., of too much. In the process of passing from one extreme to the other, there would be a long interval, so I imagined, during which the more fortunate third of the human race would make the best of both worlds — the disorderly world of liberalism and the much too or­derly Brave New World where perfect efficiency left no room for freedom or personal initiative.

Twenty-seven years later, in this third quarter of the twentieth century A.D., and long before the end of the first century A.F., I feel a good deal less optimistic than I did when I was writing Brave New World. The prophecies made in 1931 are coming true much sooner than I thought they would. The blessed interval between too little order and the nightmare of too much has not begun and shows no sign of beginning. In the West, it is true, individual men and women still enjoy a large measure of freedom. But even in those countries that have a tradition of democra­tic government, this freedom and even the desire for this freedom seems to be on the wane. In the rest of the world freedom for individuals has already gone, or is manifestly about to go. The nightmare of total organization, which I had situated in the seventh century after Ford, has emerged from the safe, remote future and is now awaiting us, just around the next corner.

George Orwell’s 1984 was a magnified projec­tion into the future of a present that contained Stalinism and an immediate past that had witnes­sed the flowering of Nazism. Brave New World was written before the rise of Hitler to supreme power in Germany and when the Russian tyrant had not yet got into his stride. In 1931 systematic terrorism was not the obsessive contemporary fact which it had become in 1948, and the future dictatorship of my imaginary world was a good deal less brutal than the future dictatorship so brilliantly portrayed by Orwell. In the context of 1948, 1984 seemed dread­fully convincing. But tyrants, after all, are mortal and circumstances change. Recent developments in Russia, and recent advances in science and technology, have robbed Orwell’s book of some of its gruesome verisimilitude. A nuclear war will, of course, make nonsense of everybody’s predictions. But, assuming for the moment that the Great Powers can somehow refrain from destroying us, we can say that it now looks as though the odds were more in favour of something like Brave New World than of something like 1984.

In the light of what we have recently learned about animal behaviour in general, and human behaviour in particular, it has become clear that control through the punishment of undesirable behaviour is less effective, in the long run, than control through the reinforcement of desirable behaviour by rewards, and that government through terror works on the whole less well than government through the non-violent manipula­tion of the environment and of the thoughts and feelings of the individual men, women and chil­dren. Punish­ment temporarily puts a stop to undesirable behaviour, but does not permanently reduce the victim’s tendency to indulge in it. Moreover, the psycho-physical by-products of punish­ment may be just as undesirable as the behaviour for which an individual has been pu­nished. Psycho-therapy is largely concerned with the debilitating or anti-social conse­quences of past punishments.

The society described in 1984 is a society controlled almost exclusively by punishment and the fear of punish­ment. In the imaginary world of my own fables, punishment is infrequent and generally mild. The nearly perfect control exer­cised by the government is achieved by systematic reinforcement of desirable behaviour, by many kinds of nearly non-violent manipulation, both physical and psycho­logical, and by genetic stan­dardization. Babies in bottles and the centralized control of reproduction are not perhaps impossi­ble; but it is quite clear that for a long time to come we shall remain a viviparous species breed­ing at random. For practical purposes genetic standardization may be ruled out. Societies will continue to be controlled post-natally — by punishment, as in the past, and to an ever-increasing extent by the more effective methods of reward and scientific manipulation.

In Russia the old-fashioned, 1984-style dicta­torship of Stalin has begun to give way to a more up-to-date form of tyranny. In the upper levels of the Soviets’ hierarchical society the reinforcement of desirable behaviour has begun to replace the older methods of control through the punishment of undesirable behaviour. Engineers and scien­tists, teachers and administrators, are hand­somely paid for good work and so moderately taxed that they are under constant incentive to do better and so be more highly rewarded. In certain areas they are at liberty to think and do more or less what they like. Punishment awaits them only when they stray beyond their prescribed limits into the realms of ideology and politics. It is because they have been granted a measure of professional freedom that Russian teachers, scien­tists and technicians have achieved such remarkable successes. Those who live near the base of the Soviet pyramid enjoy none of the privileges accorded to the lucky or specially gifted minority. Their wages are meagre and they pay, in the form of high prices, a disproportionately large share of the taxes. The area in which they can do as they please is extremely restricted, and their rulers control them more by punishment and the threat of punishment than through non-violent manipu­lation or the reinforcement of desirable beha­viour by reward. The Soviet system combines elements of 1984 with elements that are prophetic of what went on among the higher castes in Brave New World.

Meanwhile impersonal forces over which we have almost no control seem to be pushing us all in the direction of the Brave New Worldian nightmare; and this impersonal pushing is being consciously accelerated by representatives of commercial and political organizations who have developed a number of new techniques for man­ipulating, in the interests of some minority, the thoughts and feelings of the masses. The techni­ques of manipulation will be discussed in later chapters. For the moment let us confine our attentions to those impersonal forces which are now making the world so extremely unsafe for democracy, so very inhospitable to individual freedom. What are these forces? And why has the nightmare which I had projected into the seventh century A.F., made so swift an advance in our direction? The answer to these questions must begin where the life of even the most highly civilized society has its beginnings — on the level of biology.

On the first Christmas Day the population of our planet was about two hundred and fifty millions — less than half the population of modern China. Sixteen centuries later, when the Pilgrim Fathers landed at Plymouth Rock, human num­bers had climbed to a little more than five hundred millions. By the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, world population had passed the seven hundred million mark. In 1931, when I was writing Brave New World, it stood at just under two billions. Today, only twenty-seven years later, there are two thousand eight hundred million of us. And tomorrow — what? Penicillin, DDT and clean water are cheap commodities, whose effects on public health are out of all proportion to their cost. Even the poorest govern­ment is rich enough to provide its subjects with a substantial measure of death control. Birth con­trol is a very different matter. Death control is something which can be provided for a whole people by a few technicians working in the pay of a benevolent government. Birth control depends on the co-operation of an entire people. It must be practised by countless individuals, from whom it demands more intelligence and will power than most of the world’s teeming illiterates possess, and (where chemical or mechanical methods of contraception are used) an expenditure of more money than most of these millions can now afford. Moreover, there are nowhere any religious tradi­tions in favour of unrestricted death, whereas religious and social traditions in favour of unre­stricted reproduction are widespread. For all these reasons, death control is achieved very easily, birth control is achieved with great dif­ficulty. Death rates have therefore fallen in recent years with startling suddenness. But birth rates have either remained at their old high level or, if they have fallen, have fallen very little and at a very slow rate. In consequence, human numbers are now increasing more rapidly than at any time in the history of the species.

Moreover, the yearly increases are themselves increasing. They increase regularly, according to the rules of compound interest; and they also increase irregularly with every application, by a technologically backward society, of the prin­ciples of Public Health. At the present time the annual increase in the world population runs to about forty-three millions. This means that every four years mankind adds to its numbers the equivalent of the present population of the United States, every eight and a half years the equivalent of the present population of India. At the rate of increase prevailing between the birth of Christ and the death of Queen Elizabeth 1 it took sixteen centuries for the population of the earth to dou­ble. At the present rate it will double in less than half a century. And this fantastically rapid doub­ling of our numbers will be taking place on a planet whose most desirable and productive areas are already densely populated, whose soils are being eroded by the frantic efforts of bad farmers to raise more food, and whose easily available mineral capital is being squandered with the reckless extrava­gance of a drunken sailor getting rid of his accumulated pay.

In the Brave New World of my fable, the problem of human numbers in their relation to natural resources had been effectively solved. An optimum figure for world population had been calculated and numbers were maintained at this figure (a little under two billions, if I remember rightly) generation after generation. In the real contemporary world, the population problem has not been solved. On the contrary it is becoming graver and more formidable with every passing year. It is against this grim biological background that all the political, economic, cultural and psychological dramas of our time are being played out. As the twentieth century wears on, as the new billions are added to the existing billions (there will be more than five and a half billions of us by the time my granddaughter is fifty), this biological background will advance, ever more insistently, ever more menacingly, towards the front and centre of the historical stage. The problem of rapidly increasing numbers in relation to natural resources, to social stability and to the well being of individuals — this is now the central problem of mankind; and it will remain the central problem certainly for another century, and perhaps for several centuries thereafter. A new age is supposed to have begun on October 4th, 1957. But actually, in the present context, all our exuberant post-Sputnik talk is irrelevant and even nonsensical. So far as the masses of mankind are concerned, the coming time will not be the Space Age; it will be the Age of Overpopulation. We can parody the words of the old song and ask,

Will the space that you’re so rich in
Light a fire in the kitchen,
Or the little god of space turn the spit, spit, spit?

The answer, it is obvious, is in the negative. A settlement on the moon may be of some military advantage to the nation that does the settling. But it will do nothing whatever to make life more tolerable, during the fifty years that it will take our present population to double, for the earth’s undernourished and proliferating billions. And even if, at some future date, emigration to Mars should become feasible, even if any considerable number of men and women were desperate enough to choose a new life under conditions comparable to those prevailing on a mountain twice as high as Mount Everest, what difference would that make?

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Other Popular Editions of the Same Title

9780060535261: Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited

Featured Edition

ISBN 10:  0060535261 ISBN 13:  9780060535261
Publisher: Harper, 2004
Hardcover

9780060901011: Brave New World & Brave New World Revisited

HarpPeren, 1965
Softcover

9780307356550: Brave New World Brave New World Revisited

Vintag..., 2007
Softcover

9780774032452: Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited (Coles Notes)

Coles ..., 2003
Softcover

9780701127695: Brave New World (A Chatto Twin)

Chatto..., 1984
Hardcover

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics 2005-07-05 (2005)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Ebooksweb
(Bensalem, PA, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial Modern Classics 2005-07-05, 2005. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. 0060776099. Seller Inventory # Z0060776099ZN

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 12.44
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

2.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Best Bates
(Bensalem, PA, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial Modern Classics. PAPERBACK. Condition: New. 0060776099. Seller Inventory # Z0060776099ZN

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 12.62
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

3.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Booklot
(Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial Modern Classics. PAPERBACK. Condition: New. 0060776099. Seller Inventory # Z0060776099ZN

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 12.62
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

4.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
Lakeside Books
(Benton Harbor, MI, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial Modern Classics. PAPERBACK. Condition: New. 0060776099 BRAND NEW, GIFT QUALITY! NOT OVERSTOCKS OR MARKED UP REMAINDERS! DIRECT FROM THE PUBLISHER!|VCF. Seller Inventory # OTF-S-9780060776091

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 9.47
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

5.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial 7/5/2005 (2005)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback or Softback Quantity Available: 5
Seller:
BargainBookStores
(Grand Rapids, MI, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial 7/5/2005, 2005. Paperback or Softback. Condition: New. Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited. Book. Seller Inventory # BBS-9780060776091

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 14.32
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

6.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Collins (2005)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback Quantity Available: 16
Seller:
BookOutlet
(Thorold, ON, Canada)

Book Description Harper Collins, 2005. Paperback. Condition: New. Paperback. Publisher overstock, may contain remainder mark on edge. Seller Inventory # 9780060776091B

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 8.34
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 6.00
From Canada to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

7.

Aldous Huxley
Published by HarperCollins Publishers Inc, United States (2007)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
Book Depository International
(London, United Kingdom)

Book Description HarperCollins Publishers Inc, United States, 2007. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English. Brand new Book. Now more than ever: Aldous Huxley's enduring "masterpiece . one of the most prophetic dystopian works of the 20th century" (Wall Street Journal) must be read and understood by anyone concerned with preserving the human spirit in the face of our "brave new world"Aldous Huxley's profoundly important classic of world literature, Brave New World is a searching vision of an unequal, technologically-advanced future where humans are genetically bred, socially indoctrinated, and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively uphold an authoritarian ruling order--all at the cost of our freedom, full humanity, and perhaps also our souls. "A genius [who] who spent his life decrying the onward march of the Machine" (The New Yorker), Huxley was a man of incomparable talents: equally an artist, a spiritual seeker, and one of history's keenest observers of human nature and civilization. Brave New World, his masterpiece, has enthralled and terrified millions of readers, and retains its urgent relevance to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying work of literature. Written in the shadow of the rise of fascism during the 1930s, Brave New World likewise speaks to a 21st-century world dominated by mass-entertainment, technology, medicine and pharmaceuticals, the arts of persuasion, and the hidden influence of elites. "Aldous Huxley is the greatest 20th century writer in English." --Chicago TribuneThis book also includes the full text of Brave New World Revisited, Huxley's 1958 nonfiction followup to Brave New World. Seller Inventory # AAC9780060776091

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 16.08
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

8.

Huxley, Aldous
Published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics July 2005 (2005)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Visible Voice Books
(Cleveland, OH, U.S.A.)

Book Description Harper Perennial Modern Classics July 2005, 2005. PAPERBACK. Condition: New. 0060776099 Harper Perennial Modern Classics July 2005 Used books show some shelf wear. Rarely contain notes/highlighting. Please contact seller for specific condition queries. Seller Inventory # 81266

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 12.74
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

9.

Aldous Huxley
Published by HarperCollins Publishers Inc, United States (2007)
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)

Book Description HarperCollins Publishers Inc, United States, 2007. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English. Brand new Book. Now more than ever: Aldous Huxley's enduring "masterpiece . one of the most prophetic dystopian works of the 20th century" (Wall Street Journal) must be read and understood by anyone concerned with preserving the human spirit in the face of our "brave new world"Aldous Huxley's profoundly important classic of world literature, Brave New World is a searching vision of an unequal, technologically-advanced future where humans are genetically bred, socially indoctrinated, and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively uphold an authoritarian ruling order--all at the cost of our freedom, full humanity, and perhaps also our souls. "A genius [who] who spent his life decrying the onward march of the Machine" (The New Yorker), Huxley was a man of incomparable talents: equally an artist, a spiritual seeker, and one of history's keenest observers of human nature and civilization. Brave New World, his masterpiece, has enthralled and terrified millions of readers, and retains its urgent relevance to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying work of literature. Written in the shadow of the rise of fascism during the 1930s, Brave New World likewise speaks to a 21st-century world dominated by mass-entertainment, technology, medicine and pharmaceuticals, the arts of persuasion, and the hidden influence of elites. "Aldous Huxley is the greatest 20th century writer in English." --Chicago TribuneThis book also includes the full text of Brave New World Revisited, Huxley's 1958 nonfiction followup to Brave New World. Seller Inventory # AAC9780060776091

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 16.78
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

10.

Aldous Huxley
ISBN 10: 0060776099 ISBN 13: 9780060776091
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Grand Eagle Retail
(Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.)

Book Description Paperback. Condition: New. Paperback. The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future ? of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient s.Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability. 340 pages. 0.380. Seller Inventory # 9780060776091

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 17.62
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

There are more copies of this book

View all search results for this book