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BodyWorld (Signed First Edition)

Shaw, Dash

1,108 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 030737842X / ISBN 13: 9780307378422
Published by Pantheon, 2010
New Condition: New Hardcover
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Dan Pope Books
West Hartford, CT, U.S.A.

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AbeBooks Seller Since October 12, 2002

About this Item

New York: Pantheon [2010]. SIGNED first edition. First printing. Hardcover. New. A tight unread copy, opened only for author to SIGN on the title page, along with the date and an illustration in magic marker. The binding on the first page has creased and slightly started to break away. Common defect for this book, due to its vertical design. Shipped in well padded box. Originally serialized online, and revised for its print incarnation. Rave review, July 18, 2010, NY Times Sunday Book Review. Cool format, a vertical book, illustrated covers. Bookseller Inventory # Graphic-Novels-03

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Bibliographic Details

Title: BodyWorld (Signed First Edition)

Publisher: Pantheon

Publication Date: 2010

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition: New

Dust Jacket Condition: No Jacket

Signed: Signed by Author(s)

Edition: 1st Edition...

About this title

Synopsis:

From the astonishing imagination of Dash Shaw, visionary author of Bottomless Belly Button, comes a darkly fantastical graphic novel about a small town, a lowlife botanist, and a mysterious plant with strange powers.

It’s 2060, and a devastating civil war has left the country in shambles. Professor Paulie Panther–botanist, writer, and hopeless romantic–arrives in the experimental forest town of Boney Borough to research a strange plant growing behind the high school. As he conducts his research, he befriends some of the local residents: Miss Jem, the alluring science teacher; Billy Borg, Boney Borough’s star athlete; and Pearl Peach, the rebellious schoolgirl. Paulie soon discovers that the plant, when smoked, imparts telepathic powers. But when he shares this remarkable drug with his new friends, he finds that they’re not interested in mind-expansion. In fact, it appears that Paulie’s brash individualism might not be at all welcome in a town that prefers conformity to eccentricity.

Nominated for a 2009 Eisner Award and with a bold, innovative design, BodyWorld is a mind-blowing blend of science-fiction, classic high school drama, and futuristic what-if. It is at once funny and fearless–and sure to be the graphic novel event of the year.

Review:

Questions for Dash Shaw on Bodyworld

Q: Bodyworld is about people who smoke a mysterious plant and can then read and feel each others’ thoughts. Where did you dream up that concept? Was there one event in particular that inspired it?
A: When I was in college I was really into figure drawing, and kept being involved in it after I graduated. When you’re drawing someone, part of it is imagining what it’s like to be inside of the person. You imagine yourself in their body, or look for a psychology in the kinds of poses they make or their face. I was also thinking about how to express how people think in comics, in ways outside of the normal thought balloons (which are just words). If you’re doing a book about telepathy, you’re really doing a book about how people think, and what it’s like to be inside of another person. So of course that leads to a strange, confusing, and funny, often goofy, story.

Q: Which character from Bodyworld was your favorite to dream up? Are any of them based on people in your life?
A: The main character, Paulie Panther, was the most fun for me. I think that shows on the page, especially during his interactions with some of the other characters, like Billy Borg. I can’t say that anyone was based on a specific, real person. The characters in Bodyworld are very stylized, cartoony, and unrealistic. I think they come more from my sense of humor than anything else.

Q: Which step (pencils, colors, etc.) is your favorite part of the drawing process?
A: For Bodyworld, it was the colors. I had done a lot of color comics before Bodyworld, but they were printed in grays because I didn’t know what I was doing. Color really freed me up. It was very playful. I work more unself-consciously in color, probably because for many years I was only interested in line drawing and black-and-white comics. It started to feel like my drawings were just an amalgamation of other people’s drawings, how someone else drew a hand or tree, but I didn’t have that baggage with color. The colors then helped my drawing, too. It’s hard to separate the different steps in Bodyworld, since all of the stages were integrated. It wasn’t like I did all of the drawings and then colored it. A lot of the pages moved back and forth between the drawing and the coloring stages. Because I don’t work inside of a system where I have to submit pencils, or ink a drawing and then color it--since I do everything--it allows me not to separate the stages in my mind.

Q: When did you know that cartooning was something you wanted to do full-time?
A: I always wanted to be a cartoonist, and have been doing comics all of my life. I’ve had a lot of friends who wanted to be cartoonists in high school and then stopped in college, and others who stopped after college. A lot of super-talented people stop. It’s a tragedy. I don’t know why I haven’t quit, but I think it’s because I enjoy it so much, while to others the cartooning process seems to be painful. It’s still fun for me. Comics aren’t something that you should want to procrastinate from doing, and they’re more fun to make than they are to read. It’s like a noncompetitive nonspectator sport. You have to keep at it; otherwise you get out of practice.

Q: David Mazzucchelli has called you "the future of comics." Where do you see comics heading in the future?
A: Right now in bookstores, all of the comics are grouped together: the reprints are right next to the contemporary comics, next to Marvel and DC, next to a nonfiction comic, etc. It’s as if you went into the book store and everything, all of it, was organized alphabetically. So I think what’ll happen in comics is that it’ll become more like other books, in that a Web cartoonist doesn’t necessarily read print comics, in the same way that some romance author doesn’t necessarily read the latest science fiction works. That’s already happening. But that’s unusual in comics. It’s usually been a small community. But, at the same time, I think there will be people who are viewing everything as a whole. So someone will like Robert Crumb, Otto Soglow, and Suehiro Maruo and then make comics that they’d want to read. Everything will move farther apart and also come closer together at the same time.

Q: What are your favorite graphic novels/comics? If you could name five comics that should be required reading, which would they be?
A: Answering that is too much pressure for me. I’m just going to suggest five comics that I read sort of recently, or are fresh on my mind, that I can recommend:
Black Blizzard by Tatsumi
The Clover Omnibus by CLAMP
Color stories by Guido Crepax in Heavy Metal
The recent Art in Time collection, edited by Dan Nadel, especially the Kona comic reprinted in there
New comics by Yuichi Yokoyama

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