The Secret City: Woodlawn Cemetery and the Buried History of New York

3.32 avg rating
( 22 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780767906470: The Secret City: Woodlawn Cemetery and the Buried History of New York
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

In the spirit of Joseph Mitchell and E. L. Doctorow, a haunting and genre-defying portrait gallery of once-eminent, now half-forgotten New Yorkers buried in the city’s largest cemetery

Woodlawn Cemetery is a massive necropolis, four hundred immaculately and privately maintained acres in the north Bronx that serve as the final resting place for three hundred thousand New Yorkers. It is a place of startling serenity and architectural distinction as well as cultural and historical significance that nonetheless remains unknown to the majority of people who live in the city. Which is surprising when one learns that its (very) long-term inhabitants include Herman Melville, Duke Ellington, Robert Moses, Fiorello La Guardia, Miles Davis, and dozens of Gilded Age grandees—including Goulds and Astors—who were determined to spend eternity with opulence to match their residences while alive.

Writer Fred Goodman stumbled upon Woodlawn one day when he wandered off his bicycling path. The Secret City is the product of his frankly obsessive researches into the lives of many of the once famed, now forgotten men and women buried there. Featuring nine dramatic episodes, chronologically arranged, each story presents an exceptional individual caught up in a defining or historical moment of New York’s social, political, commercial, or artistic life. Readers meet phrenologist and publisher Orson Fowler, ASPCA founder Henry Bergh, Gilded Age railroad magnate Austin Corbin, political satirist Finley Peter Dunne, “Boy Mayor” John Purroy Mitchel, attorney Francis Garvan, sculptor Attilio Piccirilli, Harlem Renaissance poet Countee Cullen, leftist East Harlem Congressman Vito Marcantonio, and pioneering aviatrix Ruth Nichols.

Framing and tying together these novelistic tales is the first-person narrative of the author’s discovery of Woodlawn and his research. The Secret City is, then, an act of resurrection—a way of putting flesh on the anonymous dead, and humanizing and demystifying a city whose fabulous history is, too often, interred with its inhabitants.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

FRED GOODMAN is the author of The Mansion on the Hill: Dylan, Young, Geffen, Springsteen, and the Head-on Collision of Rock and Commerce, which received the Ralph J. Gleason Award for Best Music Book of 1997. He is a former editor of Rolling Stone, and is still a regular contributor to that publication and a variety of others. He lives with his wife and sons in White Plains, New York.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

1

I Call On Herman Melville

I first glimpsed Woodlawn through the window of a commuter express train. It was just another of the half-dozen Bronx stops I sped past twice each workday, and the concrete platforms and dull green signs of the Woodlawn station indicated nothing more than a disheveled collection of auto body shops, track yards, and overgrown lots framing an old, gray cemetery tucked against the city's northern border. It was, like so much of my native borough, just somewhere settled in some vague past and then left to its inevitable anonymous fade. If I happened to look up from my newspaper, I never gave the place a thought. And I certainly never imagined that some years later, in the wake of that terrible and inconceivable New York September, I would slip my moorings and drift out on the ocean of the city, floating without aim until the currents delivered me up to the ghosts of Woodlawn.

If I'm to be honest, I should say that I didn't even know I was drifting--just that I was suddenly having trouble sleeping. I live on a quiet street just beyond the fringe of the city these days and I'd never had a problem turning myself off before, even when I had an apartment across the street from the noisiest biker bar in Brooklyn. Back then, it fell to my girlfriend--bloodshot and bleary-eyed--to fill me in the next afternoon about the drag races which had shattered the sleep of everyone else at closing time. She would conjure malevolent chrome and black Harley choppers with glasspack-amplified exhaust systems roaring like rockets on a trajectory straight for either hell or Bay Ridge, whichever came first. For all I knew--blissful, unperturbed log that I was--she was making it up. Lately, however, I'd found myself dozing off earlier and earlier only to awaken at four, or two, or even midnight. The worst were the foggy or rainy nights when the nearby airport rerouted incoming jets right over my house. Then I'd snap awake with a sharp stab of panic at the ominous crescendo of enormous engines which, although actually high above, sounded as if they were about to crash through the roof and obliterate the house.

Nothing could lull me back to sleep, especially not the late-night news programs on the radio. If I went downstairs to reheat the coffee, just a glance at the day's spent grounds turned my stomach. The next morning on the train, exhausted and frazzled, I read my paper as I'd always done but without real comprehension, the words floating in the air before my red eyes like bits of disembodied ash that could never be put together again. And it wasn't just me. Everyone on the train, in the street, at work, lunch, or even just grabbing a smoke in front of the office buildings, was the same. That is, they were the same as they'd always been but different. Mourning hung like a gray cloud, yes, but it was more: a new uncertainty about things never questioned, a feeling of deep doubt akin to the first time you heard your father tell someone a lie. I don't know what others did, but I soon realized there were evenings when I needn't bother trying to get back to sleep. Instead, I surrendered and took to bicycling through the empty late-night streets of New York City.

Although my nocturnal sojourns were my own idea, I owed the original impetus for biking to my doctor. He's a nice guy, young and very low-key, and I like him despite the fact that he's conspicuously solemn in the manner of all modern doctors. As a kid I rode the bus with my grandmother for many of her frequent visits to a physician on the Grand Concourse--she had a heart condition--and I remember those appointments as something warm and congenial. After her exams, the doctor, a gray-haired man who favored vibrant silk ties and had a small pencil mustache like the urbane Manhattan gentlemen in Depression-era movies, would sit with her in his office and talk and laugh and share a smoke. Not something you'd want to see in your doctor today, of course. And perhaps as a seven-year-old I couldn't conceive of the approaching end that must have been the reason for all those exams, or decipher the subtle admonitions that I now suspect were the real meat of those seemingly casual conversations.

The tenor of my own trips to the doctor was all the proof I needed of how much times had changed, in general and for me. Somewhere along the line my annual physical had been magically transformed from the pro forma tests for infections and hernias that comprise back-to-school checkups into something a good deal more adult--and a great deal more anxiety-provoking. No more pencils, no more books: just stress tests, cardiograms, and the myriad nuances of the language of middle-aged blood with its lipids, glycerides, triglycerides, and omegas. "I know it seems a little humiliating," my nice doctor who doesn't smoke said sympathetically while snapping on the plastic glove for my first prostate exam. But I wasn't having any of his condescending crap. "Only one of us endured eight years of college to get to this moment," I shot back testily while exposing my best side, "and it wasn't me."

Maybe it was the glove, maybe it wasn't. But there's no doubt that there is a moment in midlife when you can feel death probing you and the inescapable fact of mortality finally comes to roost. No matter how good the rest of your day is it's always there when you get home, like the awful next door neighbor who will never move away. That's certainly not the way it is when you are younger, when the people who die are suitably old--like, forty or fifty--or the victim of some rare disease or catastrophic event. Don't misunderstand me: I am grateful for a life blessedly free of such heartaches, for healthy children and a home. Still, you don't have to be as wretched as John Cheever to understand why all those straight-arrows with nice families, big houses, and rewarding jobs suddenly take lovers or get serious about their drinking or waste the better part of their afternoons watching the breeze shake the leaves out beyond their office windows, daydreaming about drifting away from the facts of their lives as lightly as a milkweed seed. But I'm the kind of coward who likes to do all of his running away close to home. So I bought a bicycle.

Growing up in the Bronx, my brothers and my friends and I all rode Huffys and Royce Unions from the Korvette's on the Boston Post Road--a fancy bike was a Schwinn and usually reserved for an only child or someone whose parents were getting divorced--and I can vividly remember my dad assembling my red and white Japanese three-speed in the living room of our apartment while keeping one eye on the first Nixon-Kennedy debate. When I took up riding again it was an unpleasant surprise to discover six-thousand-dollar bicycles. My childhood recollection is that bicycles were toys and that when you went to a bike shop the only adult was the owner. And it's the same on the roads now: you don't see kids with baseball gloves hanging from the handlebars on their way to the ball field, or hear baseball cards clicking against the spokes--it's middle-aged men and women with heart monitors tricked out any sunny Sunday morning in padded shorts and moisture-wicking socks, heading for Starbucks on expensive hybrids with oversized, prostate-friendly seats.

Like anyone who gets on a bicycle for the first time in twenty years, I was encouraged by the truism that riding is one of those things you never forget. But my first couple of weeks made me wish I had. They were bad. Real bad. Forget leg strength--I didn't have any--the shock was how winded I became at the first hint of a hill. And not just the big, obvious ones, either, because I made it a point to stay away from those, but the gentle rises you never notice in a car, the modest but steady slope of neighborhood streets normally noticed only by the children who have to walk to and from school every day. When I recall that first week, I don't picture myself on the bicycle. Usually I'm walking. Or kneeling alongside it, fixing a jammed chain, my hands coated in thick, black grease. Still, I stuck it out and was soon proficient enough not to drop the chain whenever I downshifted for a hill. Within a month my wind and endurance were much improved, my rides increasingly ambitious. Another month and I was averaging fifteen to twenty miles with longer rides on the weekends. The gains came faster and faster and soon I was looking to extend my territory like a neighborhood dog. Inspired, I picked up the pace and rode daily. I also changed my diet, giving up meat. When that made me feel even better, I also dropped cheese and whole milk. I had discovered The Brutal Inverse Law of Midlife Fitness: If you want to feel good as a man, you've got to run around like a boy and eat like a girl.

Before long, it wasn't uncommon for me to ride fifty miles at a clip, and when I tried my hand at centuries, organized hundred-mile rides, I was pleased to discover that, while I certainly wasn't at the front of the pack, I could do them without difficulty. I also began to glimpse another level in the distance: I was meeting bikers who rode more than twenty thousand miles a year over the hilliest routes they could find, athletes training for triathlons, and riders who participated in double centuries--a particularly grueling kind of insanity requiring roughly fourteen hours of nearly nonstop riding over two hundred miles. I wasn't sure how I felt about taking it to the next step.

Then something unanticipated happened: my satisfaction proved short lived. It was that same feeling you have when you go to bed tired and happy after a hard day only to find yourself suddenly wide awake two hours later, an elusive but profoundly unsettling thought skipping quickly away along the far edge of your consciousness. I was kidding myself--no matter how far I rode, no matter how many sprints I did, it was never going to be enough. I gave up oils, fats, and nuts. Then white flour and white rice. I rode twice a day.

So I can't just blame my nice doctor who doesn't smoke. He was only doing his job responsi...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Fred Goodman
Published by Broadway (2004)
ISBN 10: 0767906470 ISBN 13: 9780767906470
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Broadway, 2004. Hardcover. Condition: New. Seller Inventory # DADAX0767906470

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 30.80
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

2.

Fred Goodman
Published by Broadway (2004)
ISBN 10: 0767906470 ISBN 13: 9780767906470
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Irish Booksellers
(Portland, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Broadway, 2004. Condition: New. book. Seller Inventory # M0767906470

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 34.77
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.27
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

3.

Goodman, Fred
Published by Broadway (2004)
ISBN 10: 0767906470 ISBN 13: 9780767906470
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 2
Seller:
Murray Media
(NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Broadway, 2004. Hardcover. Condition: New. Never used!. Seller Inventory # P110767906470

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 54.84
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

4.

Fred Goodman
ISBN 10: 0767906470 ISBN 13: 9780767906470
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
BennettBooksLtd
(San Diego, CA, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Condition: New. New. Seller Inventory # STRM-0767906470

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 77.35
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 4.95
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

5.

Fred Goodman
Published by Broadway (2004)
ISBN 10: 0767906470 ISBN 13: 9780767906470
New Hardcover First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Books Express
(Portsmouth, NH, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Broadway, 2004. Hardcover. Condition: New. First Edition. Ships with Tracking Number! INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE Shipping available. Buy with confidence, excellent customer service!. Seller Inventory # 0767906470n

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 107.70
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds