The Impact of Military Desegregation on Segregation Patterns in American Cities: A Case Study of Colorado Springs, New London and Fayetteville

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9780773454019: The Impact of Military Desegregation on Segregation Patterns in American Cities: A Case Study of Colorado Springs, New London and Fayetteville

This study investigates the significance of military institutions and their impact on metropolitan level racial and ethnic segregation. Military bases are institutions that draw large numbers of outsiders, namely young males, aged 18-24. By examining the level of segregation, racial composition, and neighborhood characteristics, in neighborhoods considered to be highly impacted by a military institution, the objectives are (1) to demonstrate an institutional effect on segregation at the metropolitan-level; and (2) to assess the social and geographic impact of military institutions in locations where they are dominant. To achieve these objectives, U.S. census data, institutional policy, and community housing market analyses are examined to illustrate the impact of military and institutional policies on metropolitan level segregation and other socioeconomic characteristics

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About the Author:

Dr. Polly J. Smith is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Utica College. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University at Albany. Dr. Smith s research focuses on urban issues and rural communities.

Review:

"Dr Smith discusses a specific problem in urban sociology: the segregation of American neighborhoods according to race and ethnicity. She reviews the theories that have been proposed to explain segregation, each with its own advantages and problems. She shows that cities with a high military presence are unique because they tend to have lower levels of segregation, positing that the desegregation of the military by Harry Truman in 1948 had perhaps set the stage for lower segregation... The ramifications are profound: by finding that the military has impacted segregation primarily in cities where the military presence has grown since the desegregation of the military, the question for urban sociology becomes, 'could other institutions in our past, such as textile mills and automotive plants, have had an influence in segregating other cities?" - Dr. Alexander R. Thomas Chair - Sociology Department S.U.N.Y. College at Oneonta"

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