The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas (A.C. Greene Series)

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9781574415346: The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas (A.C. Greene Series)
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The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. The blood feud continued into the 1890s when the final court case was settled with a governmental pardon. Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. The causes are still shrouded in mystery and legend, as both sides argued they were just and right. In April 1868 Charles Taylor and James Sharp were shot down in Bastrop County, alleged horse thieves attempting to escape. During this period many men were killed "while attempting to escape." The killing on Christmas Eve 1868 of Buck Taylor and Dick Chisholm was perhaps the final spark that turned hard feelings into fighting with bullets and knives. William Sutton was involved in both killings. "Who sheds a Taylor's blood, by a Taylor's hand must fall" became a fact of life in South Texas. Violent acts between the two groups now followed. The military reacted against the killing of two of their soldiers in Mason County by Taylors. The State Police committed acts that were not condoned by their superiors in Austin. Mobs formed in Comanche County in retaliation for John Wesley Hardin's killing of a Brown County deputy sheriff. One mob "liberated" three prisoners from the DeWitt County jail, thoughtfully hanging them close to the cemetery for the convenience of their relatives. An ambush party killed James Cox, slashing his throat from ear to ear—as if the buckshot in him was not sufficient. A doctor and his son were called from their home and brutally shot down. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. In this definitive study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud, Chuck Parsons demonstrates that the violence between the two sides was in the tradition of the family blood feud, similar to so many other nineteenth-century American feuds. His study is well augmented with numerous illustrations and appendices detailing the feudists, their attempts at treaties, and their victims.

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About the Author:

CHUCK PARSONS was born and raised in Iowa and Minnesota. His books include John B. Armstrong: Texas Ranger, Pioneer Rancher; Texas Ranger N. O. Reynolds; Captain L. H. McNelly, Texas Ranger; Bowen and Hardin; Clay Allison: Portrait of a Shootist; and The Capture of John Wesley Hardin. Parsons is editor of the Wild West History Association Saddlebag.

Review:

“Pistoleer John Wesley Hardin provided the star power for the fandango, but the horrific violence and terror engendered by the Suttons and Taylors gave the feud a near mythic status that lives even today.”—True West


“This is nothing less than the definitive study of this classic Texas feud, which spanned three decades and took eighty lives.”—Roundup Magazine


“The Suttons and Taylors were both victims and aggressors in a vicious cycle of violence and revenge. . . . Parsons no doubt tells a brilliant account of this historic, yet deadly time in Texas history.”—East Texas Historical Association Journal


“A fascinating, expertly researched chronicle of bloodshed on American soil long after the Civil War, The Sutton-Taylor Feud is a worthy addition to college library and Texas history shelves.”—Midwest Book Review


"Chuck Parsons is a true Texan whose writing of Texas history and the Texas Rangers is superb, always interesting and well researched so the reader gets the true facts."  -- H. Joaquin Jackson, coauthor of One Ranger A Texan by Choice (H. Joaquin Jackson)

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9781574412574: The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas (A.C. Greene Series)

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Publisher: University of North Texas Press, 2009
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Book Description University of North Texas Press,U.S., United States, 2013. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English. Brand new Book. The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. The blood feud continued into the 1890s when the final court case was settled with a governmental pardon. Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. The causes are still shrouded in mystery and legend, as both sides argued they were just and right. In April 1868 Charles Taylor and James Sharp were shot down in Bastrop County, alleged horse thieves attempting to escape. During this period many men were killed "while attempting to escape." The killing on Christmas Eve 1868 of Buck Taylor and Dick Chisholm was perhaps the final spark that turned hard feelings into fighting with bullets and knives. William Sutton was involved in both killings. "Who sheds a Taylor's blood, by a Taylor's hand must fall" became a fact of life in South Texas. Violent acts between the two groups now followed. The military reacted against the killing of two of their soldiers in Mason County by Taylors. The State Police committed acts that were not condoned by their superiors in Austin. Mobs formed in Comanche County in retaliation for John Wesley Hardin's killing of a Brown County deputy sheriff. One mob "liberated" three prisoners from the DeWitt County jail, thoughtfully hanging them close to the cemetery for the convenience of their relatives. An ambush party killed James Cox, slashing his throat from ear to ear-as if the buckshot in him was not sufficient. A doctor and his son were called from their home and brutally shot down. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. In this definitive study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud, Chuck Parsons demonstrates that the violence between the two sides was in the tradition of the family blood feud, similar to so many other nineteenth-century American feuds. His study is well augmented with numerous illustrations and appendices detailing the feudists, their attempts at treaties, and their victims. Seller Inventory # AAN9781574415346

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Book Description University of North Texas Press,U.S., United States, 2013. Paperback. Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English. Brand new Book. The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. The blood feud continued into the 1890s when the final court case was settled with a governmental pardon. Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. The causes are still shrouded in mystery and legend, as both sides argued they were just and right. In April 1868 Charles Taylor and James Sharp were shot down in Bastrop County, alleged horse thieves attempting to escape. During this period many men were killed "while attempting to escape." The killing on Christmas Eve 1868 of Buck Taylor and Dick Chisholm was perhaps the final spark that turned hard feelings into fighting with bullets and knives. William Sutton was involved in both killings. "Who sheds a Taylor's blood, by a Taylor's hand must fall" became a fact of life in South Texas. Violent acts between the two groups now followed. The military reacted against the killing of two of their soldiers in Mason County by Taylors. The State Police committed acts that were not condoned by their superiors in Austin. Mobs formed in Comanche County in retaliation for John Wesley Hardin's killing of a Brown County deputy sheriff. One mob "liberated" three prisoners from the DeWitt County jail, thoughtfully hanging them close to the cemetery for the convenience of their relatives. An ambush party killed James Cox, slashing his throat from ear to ear-as if the buckshot in him was not sufficient. A doctor and his son were called from their home and brutally shot down. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. In this definitive study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud, Chuck Parsons demonstrates that the violence between the two sides was in the tradition of the family blood feud, similar to so many other nineteenth-century American feuds. His study is well augmented with numerous illustrations and appendices detailing the feudists, their attempts at treaties, and their victims. Seller Inventory # AAN9781574415346

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