The Reform Advocate: Jews of Richmond (Classic Reprint)

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9781330353998: The Reform Advocate: Jews of Richmond (Classic Reprint)

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These early papers were unfortunately destroyed in 1865, when the Confederates evacuated Richmond and the city was set on fire. As evidence of the existence of a communial organization, prior to 1791, the address of the Hebrew Congregations of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and Richmond, in 1790, to George Washington may be cited. This congratulatory address to the Father of His Country and General Washington's reply are herewith appended:

"The address of the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Richmond and Charleston, to the President of the United States:

"Sir - It is reserved for you to unite in affection for your character and person every political and religious denomination of men, and in this will the Hebrew Congregations aforesaid yield to no class of their fellow-citizens.

"We have hitherto been prevented by various circumstances peculiar to our situation from adding our congratulations to those which the rest of America have offered on your elevation to the chair of the federal government. Deign, then, illustrious sir, to accept this our homage.

"The wonders which the Lord of Hosts hath worked in the days of our forefathers have taught us to observe the greatness of His wisdom and His might through the events of the late glorious revolution; and, while we humble ourselves at His footstool in thanksgiving and praise for the blessing of His deliverance, we acknowledge you, the leader of American armies, as His chosen and beloved servant. But not to your sword alone is present happiness to be ascribed; that, indeed, opened the way to freedom, but never was it perfectly secure until your hand gave birth to the Federal Constitution and you renounced the joys of retirement to seal by your administration in peace what you had achieved in war.

"To the eternal God, who is thy refuge, we commit in our prayers the care of thy precious life; and when, full of years, thou shalt be gathered unto thy people, thy righteousness shall go before thee, that the Lord hath set apart the godly for Himself, whilst thy name and thy virtues will remain an indelible memorial on our minds.

"For and in behalf and under the authority of the several congregations aforesaid.

"Manuel Josephson."

"Philadelphia, December 13, 1790."

To this address the President was pleased to reply as follows:

"Answer: To the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and Richmond:

"Gentlemen - The liberality of sentiment toward each other, which marks every political and religious denomination of men in this country, stands unparalleled in the history of nations.

"The affection of such a people is a treasure beyond the reach, of calculation, and the repeated proofs which my fellow citizens have given of their attachment to me and approbation of my doings, form the purest source of my temporal felicity. The affectionate expressions of your address again excite my gratitude and receive my warmest acknowledgement.

"The power and goodness of the Almighty, so strongly manifested in the events of the late glorious Revolution, and his kind interposition in our behalf, have been no less visible in the establishment of our present equal government. In war He directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our councils. My agency in both has been guided by the best intentions and a sense of duty I owe to my country.

"And as my exertions have hitherto been amply rewarded by the approbation of my fellow-citizens, I shall endeavor to deserve a continuance of it by my future conduct.

"May the same temporal and eternal blessings which you implore for me rest upon your congregations.

"G. Washington."

This reply was preserved in the archives of Beth Shalome. The most valued probably, of many valuable documents, it shared the fate of the others in th

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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Reform Advocate: Jews of Richmond These early papers were unfortunately destroyed in 1865, when the Confederates evacuated Richmond and the city was set on fire. As evidence of the existence of a communial organization, prior to 1791, the address of the Hebrew Congregations of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and Richmond, in 1790, to George Washington may be cited. This congratulatory address to the Father of His Country and General Washington s reply are herewith appended: The address of the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Richmond and Charleston, to the President of the United States: Sir - It is reserved for you to unite in affection for your character and person every political and religious denomination of men, and in this will the Hebrew Congregations aforesaid yield to no class of their fellow-citizens. We have hitherto been prevented by various circumstances peculiar to our situation from adding our congratulations to those which the rest of America have offered on your elevation to the chair of the federal government. Deign, then, illustrious sir, to accept this our homage. The wonders which the Lord of Hosts hath worked in the days of our forefathers have taught us to observe the greatness of His wisdom and His might through the events of the late glorious revolution; and, while we humble ourselves at His footstool in thanksgiving and praise for the blessing of His deliverance, we acknowledge you, the leader of American armies, as His chosen and beloved servant. But not to your sword alone is present happiness to be ascribed; that, indeed, opened the way to freedom, but never was it perfectly secure until your hand gave birth to the Federal Constitution and you renounced the joys of retirement to seal by your administration in peace what you had achieved in war. To the eternal God, who is thy refuge, we commit in our prayers the care of thy precious life; and when, full of years, thou shalt be gathered unto thy people, thy righteousness shall go before thee, that the Lord hath set apart the godly for Himself, whilst thy name and thy virtues will remain an indelible memorial on our minds. For and in behalf and under the authority of the several congregations aforesaid. Manuel Josephson. Philadelphia, December 13, 1790. To this address the President was pleased to reply as follows: Answer: To the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and Richmond: Gentlemen - The liberality of sentiment toward each other, which marks every political and religious denomination of men in this country, stands unparalleled in the history of nations. The affection of such a people is a treasure beyond the reach, of calculation, and the repeated proofs which my fellow citizens have given of their attachment to me and approbation of my doings, form the purest source of my temporal felicity. The affectionate expressions of your address again excite my gratitude and receive my warmest acknowledgement. The power and goodness of the Almighty, so strongly manifested in the events of the late glorious Revolution, and his kind interposition in our behalf, have been no less visible in the establishment of our present equal government. In war He directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our councils. My agency in both has been guided by the best intentions and a sense of duty I owe to my country. And as my exertions have hitherto been amply rewarded by the approbation of my fellow-citizens, I shall endeavor to deserve a continuance of it by my future conduct. May the same temporal and eternal blessings which you implore for me rest upon your congregations. G. Washington. This reply was preserved in the archives of Beth Shalome. The most valued probably, of many valuable documents, it shared the fate of the others in th. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330353998

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Book Description Forgotten Books. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 38 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.1in.Excerpt from The Reform Advocate: Jews of RichmondThese early papers were unfortunately destroyed in 1865, when the Confederates evacuated Richmond and the city was set on fire. As evidence of the existence of a communial organization, prior to 1791, the address of the Hebrew Congregations of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and Richmond, in 1790, to George Washington may be cited. This congratulatory address to the Father of His Country and General Washingtons reply are herewith appended: The address of the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Richmond and Charleston, to the President of the United States: Sir - It is reserved for you to unite in affection for your character and person every political and religious denomination of men, and in this will the Hebrew Congregations aforesaid yield to no class of their fellow-citizens. We have hitherto been prevented by various circumstances peculiar to our situation from adding our congratulations to those which the rest of America have offered on your elevation to the chair of the federal government. Deign, then, illustrious sir, to accept this our homage. The wonders which the Lord of Hosts hath worked in the days of our forefathers have taught us to observe the greatness of His wisdom and His might through the events of the late glorious revolution; and, while we humble ourselves at His footstool in thanksgiving and praise for the blessing of His deliverance, we acknowledge you, the leader of American armies, as His chosen and beloved servant. But not to your sword alone is present happiness to be ascribed; that, indeed, opened the way to freedom, but never was it perfectly secure until your hand gave birth to the Federal Constitution and you renounced the joys of retirement to seal by your administration in peace what you had achieved in war. To the eternal God, who is thy refuge, we commit in our prayers the care of thy precious life; and when, full of years, thou shalt be gathered unto thy people, thy righteousness shall go before thee, that the Lord hath set apart the godly for Himself, whilst thy name and thy virtues will remain an indelible memorial on our minds. For and in behalf and under the authority of the several congregations aforesaid. Manuel Josephson. Philadelphia, December 13, 1790. To this address the President was pleased to reply as follows: Answer: To the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and Richmond: Gentlemen - The liberality of sentiment toward each other, which marks every political and religious denomination of men in this country, stands unparalleled in the history of nations. The affection of such a people is a treasure beyond the reach, of calculation, and the repeated proofs which my fellow citizens have given of their attachment to me and approbation of my doings, form the purest source of my temporal felicity. The affectionate expressions of your address again excite my gratitude and receive my warmest acknowledgement. The power and goodness of the Almighty, so strongly manifested in the events of the late glorious Revolution, and his kind interposition in our behalf, have been no less visible in the establishment of our present equal government. In war He directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our councils. My agency in both has been guided by the best intentions and a sense of duty I owe to my country. And as my exertions have hitherto been amply rewarded by the approbation of my fellow-citizens, I shall endeavor to deserve a continuance of it by my future conduct. May the same temporal and eternal blessings which you implore for me rest upon your congregations. G. Washington. This reply was preserved in the archives of Beth Shalome. The most valued probably, of many valuable documents, it shared the fate of the others in th. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781330353998

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Gaston Lichtenstein
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Reform Advocate: Jews of Richmond These early papers were unfortunately destroyed in 1865, when the Confederates evacuated Richmond and the city was set on fire. As evidence of the existence of a communial organization, prior to 1791, the address of the Hebrew Congregations of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and Richmond, in 1790, to George Washington may be cited. This congratulatory address to the Father of His Country and General Washington s reply are herewith appended: The address of the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Richmond and Charleston, to the President of the United States: Sir - It is reserved for you to unite in affection for your character and person every political and religious denomination of men, and in this will the Hebrew Congregations aforesaid yield to no class of their fellow-citizens. We have hitherto been prevented by various circumstances peculiar to our situation from adding our congratulations to those which the rest of America have offered on your elevation to the chair of the federal government. Deign, then, illustrious sir, to accept this our homage. The wonders which the Lord of Hosts hath worked in the days of our forefathers have taught us to observe the greatness of His wisdom and His might through the events of the late glorious revolution; and, while we humble ourselves at His footstool in thanksgiving and praise for the blessing of His deliverance, we acknowledge you, the leader of American armies, as His chosen and beloved servant. But not to your sword alone is present happiness to be ascribed; that, indeed, opened the way to freedom, but never was it perfectly secure until your hand gave birth to the Federal Constitution and you renounced the joys of retirement to seal by your administration in peace what you had achieved in war. To the eternal God, who is thy refuge, we commit in our prayers the care of thy precious life; and when, full of years, thou shalt be gathered unto thy people, thy righteousness shall go before thee, that the Lord hath set apart the godly for Himself, whilst thy name and thy virtues will remain an indelible memorial on our minds. For and in behalf and under the authority of the several congregations aforesaid. Manuel Josephson. Philadelphia, December 13, 1790. To this address the President was pleased to reply as follows: Answer: To the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and Richmond: Gentlemen - The liberality of sentiment toward each other, which marks every political and religious denomination of men in this country, stands unparalleled in the history of nations. The affection of such a people is a treasure beyond the reach, of calculation, and the repeated proofs which my fellow citizens have given of their attachment to me and approbation of my doings, form the purest source of my temporal felicity. The affectionate expressions of your address again excite my gratitude and receive my warmest acknowledgement. The power and goodness of the Almighty, so strongly manifested in the events of the late glorious Revolution, and his kind interposition in our behalf, have been no less visible in the establishment of our present equal government. In war He directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our councils. My agency in both has been guided by the best intentions and a sense of duty I owe to my country. And as my exertions have hitherto been amply rewarded by the approbation of my fellow-citizens, I shall endeavor to deserve a continuance of it by my future conduct. May the same temporal and eternal blessings which you implore for me rest upon your congregations. G. Washington. This reply was preserved in the archives of Beth Shalome. The most valued probably, of many valuable documents, it shared the fate of the others in th. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330353998

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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Reform Advocate: Jews of Richmond These early papers were unfortunately destroyed in 1865, when the Confederates evacuated Richmond and the city was set on fire. As evidence of the existence of a communial organization, prior to 1791, the address of the Hebrew Congregations of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston and Richmond, in 1790, to George Washington may be cited. This congratulatory address to the Father of His Country and General Washington s reply are herewith appended: The address of the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Richmond and Charleston, to the President of the United States: Sir - It is reserved for you to unite in affection for your character and person every political and religious denomination of men, and in this will the Hebrew Congregations aforesaid yield to no class of their fellow-citizens. We have hitherto been prevented by various circumstances peculiar to our situation from adding our congratulations to those which the rest of America have offered on your elevation to the chair of the federal government. Deign, then, illustrious sir, to accept this our homage. The wonders which the Lord of Hosts hath worked in the days of our forefathers have taught us to observe the greatness of His wisdom and His might through the events of the late glorious revolution; and, while we humble ourselves at His footstool in thanksgiving and praise for the blessing of His deliverance, we acknowledge you, the leader of American armies, as His chosen and beloved servant. But not to your sword alone is present happiness to be ascribed; that, indeed, opened the way to freedom, but never was it perfectly secure until your hand gave birth to the Federal Constitution and you renounced the joys of retirement to seal by your administration in peace what you had achieved in war. To the eternal God, who is thy refuge, we commit in our prayers the care of thy precious life; and when, full of years, thou shalt be gathered unto thy people, thy righteousness shall go before thee, that the Lord hath set apart the godly for Himself, whilst thy name and thy virtues will remain an indelible memorial on our minds. For and in behalf and under the authority of the several congregations aforesaid. Manuel Josephson. Philadelphia, December 13, 1790. To this address the President was pleased to reply as follows: Answer: To the Hebrew Congregations in the cities of Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and Richmond: Gentlemen - The liberality of sentiment toward each other, which marks every political and religious denomination of men in this country, stands unparalleled in the history of nations. The affection of such a people is a treasure beyond the reach, of calculation, and the repeated proofs which my fellow citizens have given of their attachment to me and approbation of my doings, form the purest source of my temporal felicity. The affectionate expressions of your address again excite my gratitude and receive my warmest acknowledgement. The power and goodness of the Almighty, so strongly manifested in the events of the late glorious Revolution, and his kind interposition in our behalf, have been no less visible in the establishment of our present equal government. In war He directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our councils. My agency in both has been guided by the best intentions and a sense of duty I owe to my country. And as my exertions have hitherto been amply rewarded by the approbation of my fellow-citizens, I shall endeavor to deserve a continuance of it by my future conduct. May the same temporal and eternal blessings which you implore for me rest upon your congregations. G. Washington. This reply was preserved in the archives of Beth Shalome. The most valued probably, of many valuable documents, it shared the fate of t. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781330353998

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