Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture (Classic Reprint)

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9781330435366: Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture

The Leland, Faulconer & Norton Co., of Detroit, Mich., was formed in 1890 for the purpose of building machine tools and special machinery. Special milling machines, a lathe center grinder, a vet tool grinder, and some special machinery were built. Later the manufacture of wood trimmers for pattern shop use was undertaken; and next, during the development period of the bicycle industry, a line of machinery for making hardened and ground bicycle gears was developed. As the bicycle business declined, the company began building gas engines for motor boats, which were then rapidly rising in popularity. The natural step from the marine to the automobile type of gas engine was made in 1901 to 1902, when the motor now used in the Cadillac car was produced. In 1905 the company was united with the automobile firm building the Cadillac car to form the present Cadillac Motor Car Co. From 1902 until March, 1909, about 21,000 cars had been turned out, 17,000 of which were single cylinder 10 H. P. machines, and the rest four cylinder cars, rated at 30 H. P.

The main or Cadillac plant has a double siding connected with the Belt Line Railroad, thus giving ample shipping facilities. The factory buildings are of brick and reinforced concrete construction, lighted by large windows. Heat is supplied by a live steam system. The boiler-room contains three water tube boilers, with room for another if it is needed. Light and power are furnished by electric current supplied by the Detroit Edison Co. Electric driving is used throughout the plant, with motors connected with each line shaft, and occasional installations with direct connected tools. A large compressor furnishes air at 125 pounds pressure for the pneumatic hammers in the frame department, and for use in the various assembling departments, i for cleaning parts, running air drills, etc. Five large elevators in i fire-proofed brick shafts convey materials and parts between the various floors. An automatic sprinkler system is installed, supplied by four tanks on the roof. These tanks are filled by a large fire pump which operates whenever the level of water in the tanks is reduced. This same system supplies water for lavatory and wash-room use. There are two large wash-rooms, each having 600 bowls and 1,000 lockers.

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This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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Clair B Owen
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1330435362 ISBN 13: 9781330435366
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture The Leland, Faulconer Norton Co., of Detroit, Mich., was formed in 1890 for the purpose of building machine tools and special machinery. Special milling machines, a lathe center grinder, a vet tool grinder, and some special machinery were built. Later the manufacture of wood trimmers for pattern shop use was undertaken; and next, during the development period of the bicycle industry, a line of machinery for making hardened and ground bicycle gears was developed. As the bicycle business declined, the company began building gas engines for motor boats, which were then rapidly rising in popularity. The natural step from the marine to the automobile type of gas engine was made in 1901 to 1902, when the motor now used in the Cadillac car was produced. In 1905 the company was united with the automobile firm building the Cadillac car to form the present Cadillac Motor Car Co. From 1902 until March, 1909, about 21,000 cars had been turned out, 17,000 of which were single cylinder 10 H. P. machines, and the rest four cylinder cars, rated at 30 H. P. The main or Cadillac plant has a double siding connected with the Belt Line Railroad, thus giving ample shipping facilities. The factory buildings are of brick and reinforced concrete construction, lighted by large windows. Heat is supplied by a live steam system. The boiler-room contains three water tube boilers, with room for another if it is needed. Light and power are furnished by electric current supplied by the Detroit Edison Co. Electric driving is used throughout the plant, with motors connected with each line shaft, and occasional installations with direct connected tools. A large compressor furnishes air at 125 pounds pressure for the pneumatic hammers in the frame department, and for use in the various assembling departments, i for cleaning parts, running air drills, etc. Five large elevators in i fire-proofed brick shafts convey materials and parts between the various floors. An automatic sprinkler system is installed, supplied by four tanks on the roof. These tanks are filled by a large fire pump which operates whenever the level of water in the tanks is reduced. This same system supplies water for lavatory and wash-room use. There are two large wash-rooms, each having 600 bowls and 1,000 lockers. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330435366

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Clair B Owen
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1330435362 ISBN 13: 9781330435366
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture The Leland, Faulconer Norton Co., of Detroit, Mich., was formed in 1890 for the purpose of building machine tools and special machinery. Special milling machines, a lathe center grinder, a vet tool grinder, and some special machinery were built. Later the manufacture of wood trimmers for pattern shop use was undertaken; and next, during the development period of the bicycle industry, a line of machinery for making hardened and ground bicycle gears was developed. As the bicycle business declined, the company began building gas engines for motor boats, which were then rapidly rising in popularity. The natural step from the marine to the automobile type of gas engine was made in 1901 to 1902, when the motor now used in the Cadillac car was produced. In 1905 the company was united with the automobile firm building the Cadillac car to form the present Cadillac Motor Car Co. From 1902 until March, 1909, about 21,000 cars had been turned out, 17,000 of which were single cylinder 10 H. P. machines, and the rest four cylinder cars, rated at 30 H. P. The main or Cadillac plant has a double siding connected with the Belt Line Railroad, thus giving ample shipping facilities. The factory buildings are of brick and reinforced concrete construction, lighted by large windows. Heat is supplied by a live steam system. The boiler-room contains three water tube boilers, with room for another if it is needed. Light and power are furnished by electric current supplied by the Detroit Edison Co. Electric driving is used throughout the plant, with motors connected with each line shaft, and occasional installations with direct connected tools. A large compressor furnishes air at 125 pounds pressure for the pneumatic hammers in the frame department, and for use in the various assembling departments, i for cleaning parts, running air drills, etc. Five large elevators in i fire-proofed brick shafts convey materials and parts between the various floors. An automatic sprinkler system is installed, supplied by four tanks on the roof. These tanks are filled by a large fire pump which operates whenever the level of water in the tanks is reduced. This same system supplies water for lavatory and wash-room use. There are two large wash-rooms, each having 600 bowls and 1,000 lockers. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330435366

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand for shipment within 3 working days. Bookseller Inventory # LP9781330435366

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Clair B Owen
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from Machines, Tools and Methods of Automobile Manufacture The Leland, Faulconer Norton Co., of Detroit, Mich., was formed in 1890 for the purpose of building machine tools and special machinery. Special milling machines, a lathe center grinder, a vet tool grinder, and some special machinery were built. Later the manufacture of wood trimmers for pattern shop use was undertaken; and next, during the development period of the bicycle industry, a line of machinery for making hardened and ground bicycle gears was developed. As the bicycle business declined, the company began building gas engines for motor boats, which were then rapidly rising in popularity. The natural step from the marine to the automobile type of gas engine was made in 1901 to 1902, when the motor now used in the Cadillac car was produced. In 1905 the company was united with the automobile firm building the Cadillac car to form the present Cadillac Motor Car Co. From 1902 until March, 1909, about 21,000 cars had been turned out, 17,000 of which were single cylinder 10 H. P. machines, and the rest four cylinder cars, rated at 30 H. P. The main or Cadillac plant has a double siding connected with the Belt Line Railroad, thus giving ample shipping facilities. The factory buildings are of brick and reinforced concrete construction, lighted by large windows. Heat is supplied by a live steam system. The boiler-room contains three water tube boilers, with room for another if it is needed. Light and power are furnished by electric current supplied by the Detroit Edison Co. Electric driving is used throughout the plant, with motors connected with each line shaft, and occasional installations with direct connected tools. A large compressor furnishes air at 125 pounds pressure for the pneumatic hammers in the frame department, and for use in the various assembling departments, i for cleaning parts, running air drills, etc. Five large elevators in i fire-proofed brick shafts convey materials and parts between the various floors. An automatic sprinkler system is installed, supplied by four tanks on the roof. These tanks are filled by a large fire pump which operates whenever the level of water in the tanks is reduced. This same system supplies water for lavatory and wash-room use. There are two large wash-rooms, each having 600 bowls and 1,000 lockers. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781330435366

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